Liriano, Tabata lead Pirates to 5-2 win over Rockies

first_imgPittsburgh Pirates’ Andrew McCutchen (22), Starling Marte, center, and Jose Tabata, right, celebrate with teammates as they leave the field after defeating the Colorado Rockies in the baseball game on Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013, in Pittsburgh. The Pirates won 5-2. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic) PITTSBURGH (AP) – Francisco Liriano has won twice as many games as he did a year ago and there’s still two months to go in the season.Liriano continued his recent dominance with seven strong innings, and Jose Tabata homered and drove in two runs to lead the Pittsburgh Pirates to a 5-2 win over the Colorado Rockies on Saturday night.Liriano (12-4) allowed only two hits to offset his five walks and had six strikeouts. The left-hander improved to 7-1 with a 1.65 ERA in his last eight starts for the NL Central leaders.Last season, Liriano was a combined 6-12 with the Minnesota Twins and Chicago White Sox. He has a hard time explaining his turnaround, which is a big reason why the Pirates hold a 1 ½-game lead over St. Louis in the NL Central.“What can I say?” he said. “Everything is going good for me and good for the team. I’m not really thinking about it too much. I’m just going out and pitching and trying to be aggressive and get people out. It’s working out well for me and it is working out for well for the team because we’re winning.”Tabata hit his first home run since May 11 – a span of 112 plate appearances – and also tripled while going 3 for 4 to raise his average to .266. Tabata has hit just three homers this season, which is why general manager Neal Huntington tried to trade for an outfielder before the July 31 non-waiver deadline, though without success.“We’ve seen Jose swing the bat like this before and be productive over the last few years,” Pirates manager Clint Hurdle said. “Hopefully, he will get hot.”The Rockies put men on base in six of Liriano’s seven innings but they went 0 for 9 against him with runners on, including five hitless at-bats with runners in scoring position.“When I walk people it’s because I’m overthrowing,” Liriano said. “When guys got on base, I told myself to slow down and make pitches, not try to do too much.”Colorado lost for the fifth time in six games.“We had some opportunities early but like most of the good ones once he settled in he was tough,” Rockies manager Walt Weiss said. “He had a good changeup and his command was pretty good even though he walked some guys.”Gaby Sanchez had two hits and two RBIs for Pittsburgh, while Jordy Mercer and Andrew McCutchen added two hits each.Fill-in closer Mark Melancon pitched a 1-2-3 ninth for his sixth save.Jorge De La Rosa (10-6) pitched four-plus innings and gave up three runs on six hits while striking out three and walking two. The outing came a day after Rockies owner Dick Monfort said Colorado would exercise De La Rosa’s $11 million club option for 2014.“Jorge didn’t have very good command,” Weiss said. “It was a struggle for him from the start.”The Pirates scored one run each in the third through seventh innings to take a 5-0 lead.In the third, Starling Marte led off with a single, stole second, took third on Jordy Mercer’s groundout and scored on Andrew McCutchen’s double. Tabata led off the fourth by homering over the 375 sign in right-center for his third of the season.Sanchez hit run-scoring singles in both the fifth and seventh innings, while Tabata led off the sixth with a triple and scored on Josh Harrison’s squeeze bunt.Colorado finally scored a pair in the eighth on consecutive RBI singles by Troy Tulowitzki and Michael Cuddyer, who returned to the team after missing the previous two games because of a family emergency.NOTES: Colorado LF Carlos Gonzalez was not in the lineup for a fourth straight game with a sprained right middle finger but hopes to play Sunday. … Rockies 1B Todd Helton, who has normally been rested twice a week, played in nine straight games until being rested Saturday. … Colorado RHP Roy Oswalt, on the disabled list with a strained right hamstring, was forced to cut short a simulated game because of tightness in the leg. … Pittsburgh C Russell Martin sat out for the second time in three games because of left knee soreness. … The Pirates will start RHP A.J. Burnett (4-7, 2.86 ERA) on Sunday against RHP Juan Nicasio (6-4, 4.92) in the three-game series finale.last_img read more

Less time, fewer timeouts among adjustments for NBA coaches

first_imgJake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson NBA Coach of the Year, Mike D’Antoni of the Houston Rockets speaks on stage during the 2017 NBA Awards Live On TNT on June 26, 2017 in New York City. Michael Loccisano/Getty Images for TNT /AFPNEW YORK—Mike D’Antoni ran an offensive system known as seven seconds or less, so he likes things fast.Good thing, because NBA coaches find things come at them more quickly this season.ADVERTISEMENT OSG plea to revoke ABS-CBN franchise ‘a duplicitous move’ – Lacson World Cup failure prompts calls for US soccer ‘revolution’ Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next “So instead of showing 10 clips at halftime, you might only be able to show two or three,” D’Antoni said.Byron Spruell, the NBA’s president of league operations, said the goal wasn’t to shorten the length of games, which run about 2 hours, 15 minutes. He said the league wanted the games to have a better flow, and worked with the coaches and Competition Committee, which includes some coaches, during the summer on the changes.Spruell said coaches were fine with the removal of the under-9 minute timeouts in the second and fourth quarters, feeling they came too soon after the quarters started. There will now be two mandatory timeouts in each quarter, at the under-7 and under-3 minute marks.Even at the end of games, coaches acknowledged there were too many stoppages.“As a head coach you always want more timeouts. You want to have that flexibility at the end of the game to be able to help your team,” Miami’s Erik Spoelstra said. “But when I’m watching games, I want there to be less. I do. I want there to be less timeouts and for the games to go a little bit quicker, particularly at the end. You want to just see the action.”All timeouts will now be 75 seconds. Full timeouts were formerly 90 seconds.“Before you have the little pow-wow for a long timeout, the coaches try to get reacquainted and figure out where you’re going to eat dinner,” D’Antoni joked. “But now you’ve got to go in and actually coach.”Spruell said the league didn’t get a lot of pushback from coaches on the suggested changes, even coming around on the resting rules.“I’m just happy Adam Silver gave us some good guidelines to follow when it comes to that so we don’t feel like we’re cheating our fans,” Memphis coach David Fizdale said. “That was one good thing that came out of the coaches’ meetings, Adam Silver’s leadership on that.”Player health was one reason for the shorter preseason. By adding the extra week to the regular season, the league reduced back-to-back games and has no teams playing four in five nights for the first time. Coco’s house rules on ‘Probinsyano’ set Jake says relationship with Shaina ‘goes beyond physical attraction’ Margot Robbie talks about filming ‘Bombshell’s’ disturbing sexual harassment scene Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours They are losing time and timeouts, with fewer days to prepare before the regular season and fewer chances to talk things over during games.Throw in new rules legislating how they can rest players, and there are plenty of adjustments even for veteran coaches.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSRedemption is sweet for Ginebra, Scottie ThompsonSPORTSMayweather beats Pacquiao, Canelo for ‘Fighter of the Decade’SPORTSFederer blasts lack of communication on Australian Open smog“I think it’s good,” said D’Antoni, the NBA coach of the year with Houston last year. “Take stuff out of coaches’ hands, because we just screw it up anyway. So it’s better for the players.”Among the changes: Knicks coach Jeff Hornacek said the shorter preseason wouldn’t matter to most teams, since they usually run a similar system from year to year unless there was a coaching change, and there were none.His team is different. The Knicks are largely scrapping the triangle offense they ran when Phil Jackson was president and redefining roles with leading scorer Carmelo Anthony traded. They’ve had a number of nagging injuries and may not see some combinations play together until the games count.“It’s one of those years that maybe you wish there was eight exhibition games, but it is what it is and we just have to work,” Hornacek said.There’s also a change for general managers in the form of an earlier trade deadline.Previously the Thursday after the All-Star Game, now it’s the Thursday 10 days before it. Spruell said in discussions with GMs, they felt that would benefit the traded players, who would have the break to acclimate themselves to their new cities.So there’s plenty that’s new, but Spoelstra said they will all catch on.“Whenever there’s rules changes, regardless, players or coaches, you eventually adapt and we’ll do that as well,” he said. — Tuesday’s start is the NBA’s earliest since 1980. It’s a week earlier than normal, with the maximum number of preseason games cut from eight to six.— Timeouts are reduced from 18 to 14, with each team having seven. They will be limited to two during the last three minutes of games, instead of the previous rule that permitted three timeouts in the final two minutes.— Teams can be fined $100,000 or more for resting healthy players during national TV games, and are discouraged from resting multiple healthy players in the same game or sitting them in road games.— Halftime will be 15 minutes for all games — and the league plans to be diligent about starting the clock as soon as the first half ends. There previously was a minute or two longer for national TV games, and sometimes the clock wouldn’t start until all players had cleared the floor.That change caught the attention of D’Antoni, who noted that in some arenas there is a longer walk from the benches to the locker rooms.ADVERTISEMENT Jo Koy: My brain always wants to think funny Kiss-and-tell matinee idol’s conquests: True stories or tall tales? LATEST STORIES View commentslast_img read more

Ginebra seals semis spot, ousts Rain or Shine

first_imgFortunately for Cone, he has the players to rely on when the going gets tough.With Rain or Shine still in the thick of the fight midway through the final frame, Ginebra drew crucial plays from the likes of Sol Mercado, Joe Devance and Aguilar.Aguilar hit the biggest shot of the game, sinking a short baseline jumper that extended the Kings’ lead to seven, 96-89, with 55.3 seconds left.Jervy Cruz and LA Tenorio also played key roles in the victory, finishing with 18 and 17 points, respectively.Raymond Almazan led the Painters with 14 points and 13 rebounds. Maverick Ahanmisi scored a team-high 18.ADVERTISEMENT Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.netBarangay Ginebra held off Rain or Shine, 99-91, to arrange a semifinals showdown with defending champion San Miguel Beer in the 2018 PBA Philippine Cup Wednesday at Smart Araneta Coliseum.Japeth Aguilar came up big on both ends, posting 27 points, 12 rebounds, three steals and three blocks for the Gin Kings, who swept the Elasto Painters in their best-of-three quarterfinals series.ADVERTISEMENT LATEST STORIES GALLERY: Barangay Ginebra back as PBA Governors’ Cup kings View comments Phivolcs records 2 ‘discrete weak ash explosions’ at Taal Volcano Phivolcs records 2 ‘discrete weak ash explosions’ at Taal Volcano Jiro Manio arrested for stabbing man in Marikina Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew Barangay Ginebra held off Rain or Shine, 99-91, to arrange a semifinals showdown with defending champion San Miguel Beer in the 2018 PBA Philippine Cup Wednesday at Smart Araneta Coliseum.Japeth Aguilar came up big on both ends, posting 27 points, 12 rebounds, three steals and three blocks for the Gin Kings, who swept the Elasto Painters in their best-of-three quarterfinals series.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSTim Cone, Ginebra set their sights on elusive All-Filipino crownSPORTSAfter winning title, time for LA Tenorio to give back to Batangas folk“Wow. What a relief. It’s always a big relief to get through the quarters,” said Ginebra head coach Tim Cone.“To me, the quarters series is the hardest series to win just because there’s so much pressure on you to make the semis all the time.” SEA Games 2019: Charly Suarez stops Burmese foe, advances to boxing semi PLAY LIST 03:22SEA Games 2019: Charly Suarez stops Burmese foe, advances to boxing semi04:07SEA Games: John Marvin 1st Filipino boxer to crash out, bows to Vietnam bet01:02Fajardo predicts there will be no sweep in PBA Finals02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award It’s too early to present Duterte’s ‘legacy’ – Lacson Dasmariñas still not used to fanfare ahead of second crack at IBO title Sea turtle trapped in net freed in Legazpi City Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Steam emission over Taal’s main crater ‘steady’ for past 24 hours UK plans Brexit celebrations but warns businesses may suffer MOST READ Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. last_img read more

BBCI continues to run at a loss – annual report

first_img…Govt-subsidised river taxis reduced minibus revenuesThe Berbice Bridge Company Incorporated (BBCI) is running at a loss with the company experiencing minimal growth in traffic and revenue, according to the directors in the 2015 Annual Report.This has resulted in no dividends being declared for Common Shareholders that own the equity in the bridge, for the eighth successive year since operations of the Berbice Bridge was launched.BBCI held its annual general meeting on Friday at the Guyana Cooperative Insurance Services (GCIS) building on Main Street, Georgetown. However, according to the annual report, which was seen by Guyana Times, even though the company recorded a loss of $167.4 million last year, this reflects a 30 per cent improvement when compared to the loss of $239.2 million in the previous year.According to the Directors, this reduction in both traffic and revenue growth was significantly lower than projected at the planning stages of the Berbice Bridge project. It was outlined that revenues from tolls in 2015 had amounted to $1,343 million as against $1,342 million in 2014.The report revealed that of the revenue generated, some 45.2 per cent were gained from cars, 16.16 per cent from freights, 9.29 per cent from minibuses, 10.73 per cent from medium trucks, 5.23 per cent from small trucks and 4.45 per cent from pick-ups, and remaining categories 8.89 per cent. The daily average revenue earned, the directors said, amounted to $3,682,212, a minor increase of 0.14 per cent over 2014.“This minimal increase of below one per cent over the previous year was primarily due to minor increases in traffic for cars, motorcycles and large trucks. Once again, a sharp decline was observed in traffic for minibuses and ocean-going vessels, along with a decline in all other categories, inclusive of freight,” the report stated.However, it was explained that BBCI in December last year had entered an agreement with the Government, which saw the State paying a commuters’ subsidy to reduce the Bridge toll for passenger cars and mini-buses from $2200 to $1900 and for all other types of vehicles by 10 per cent, excluding vessels.“This was done on the premise that both parties would engage shortly after implementation of the said agreement on January 1, 2016 in discussion on mutually beneficial arrangements in relation to tolls, since these were to be increased as per the toll formula,” the report stated. It is uncertain if this meeting occurred.Moreover, the BBCI directors pointed out that Government’s introduction of a “subsided” River Taxi System in September 2015 for passengers only from Rosignol Stelling to New Amsterdam, would have contributed to the significant decline in minibus traffic across the Bridge, which amounts to some six per cent over the period September 21 to December 31, 2015.In addition, the report stated that the non-interest expenses before amortization and depreciation for 2015 was $276 million compared to $292 million in the previous year. This decrease of five per cent was as a result of no dredging operations being required last year.The directors added too that BBCI’s earnings before interest, tax, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) was $1.072 billion, an increase of two per cent from 2014. However, the company’s total assets decreased from $6.7 billion to $6.5 billion in 2015, reflecting a decrease of 2.60 per cent over 2014, which was due mainly to continued amortization of concession assets, increases in property, plant and equipment, inventory and cash and cash equivalents.Additionally, the report outlined that capital expenditures for the year included the construction of a jack-up barge, a new scale for the eastern end of the bridge and a standby generator set, which are work-in-progress.last_img read more

Shovels in the ground for new skate park

first_img“One of the things I always tell my communities, whether it’s communities, whether it’s anybody writing grants, whatever, make sure your MLA knows about it,” Pimm says. “And this particular one, I happened to be speaking at the breakfast Rotary Club one morning, and Clinton was there doing a presentation and I thought, ‘man is that ever a good project’, so I went and started tracking down some information and we were able to come forward with some pretty good support.”Ackerman adds that the project was important to jump on because the Sport Council and DistrictSkateBoardPark had a plan for the skate park and knew how to go about executing it.“They’re young people and they had a dream – a good dream – and what was really important is they did not just say we have a dream and walked away,” Ackerman argues. “They had a dream and took ownership of it and got involved. Clinton and his group really helped us to make this all happen. It’s easy once you have all of that information to write all of the grants.The group worked with Newline Skate parks on the design of the project, and the company has been involved with the task since the beginning. Advertisement A number of guests were on hand for the ceremony including MLA Pat Pimm, Councillor Byron Stewart, Andy Ackerman of the North Peace Economic Development Commission, and Clinton Green, who helped spearhead the project.Green says it’s a great feeling to be at this point and he looks forward to the completion of the project.“I’m very excited; I can’t wait to ride it. I’m glad all the hard work that everyone put into it paid off.”- Advertisement -The project was important to Green for a number of reasons, in particular to give young people the chance to be the best that they can be.“I just want to see the youth in town have a place to put all their potential [to use], and have a place to progress and be safe in the process.”Pat Pimm said a few words before shovels went into the ground. He says he makes a point to inform his constituents that if they have projects in the works, to let him know so he can try to be of some assistance. The province chipped in with $448,000 towards the task.Advertisementlast_img read more

ECD man kills wife, attempts suicide

first_imgA Nabacalis, East Coast Demerara (ECD) man attacked and stabbed his wife to death on Wednesday following an argument over an extramarital affair. After killing his wife, the miner then attempted to take his own life.Dead: Vinetta HeadleyDead is Vinetta Headley-James. Reports are the 44-year-old woman was killed at about 12:50h during a heated argument with her husband, 45-year-old Sherlock James.This newspaper was told that the incident occurred at the couple’s Lot 68 Nabacalis Sideline Dam, ECD home. Guyana Times understands that James would spend long periods in the interior, and had accused his wife of cheating on him.Three days ago, the couple was involved in a heated argument over the allegations when James assaulted the mother of his three children and then fled the scene. However, he returned home on Wednesday and according a close relative, his wife attempted to put his clothing outside. This led to a confrontation and James cautioned his now dead wife against putting his belongings out of the home. During the confrontation, an angry James ran into the kitchen, where he picked up a knife and attacked his wife, stabbing her to her neck. After being stabbed to her neck, the woman ran into the yard and collapsed. She was picked up and rushed to the hospital by the couple’s eldest daughter.However, she succumbed while being treated at the CC Nicholson Hospital, ECD.James was later discovered lying a short distance from his house with a stab wound to his neck, which is suspected to be self-inflicted.He was taken to the Georgetown Public Hospital, where he is receiving treatment under guard.The police are continuing their investigations.last_img read more

Maestro Ancelotti gives Gattuso a lesson

first_img0Shares0000Napoli coach Carlo Ancelotti gives former AC Milan player Gennaro Gattuso a lesson in football. (AFP Photo/Alberto PIZZOLI)MILAN, Italy, Aug 26 – Carlo Ancelotti gave former protege Gennaro Gattuso a lesson in football as Napoli came from two goals down to beat AC Milan 3-2 in Serie A on Saturday.Ancelotti — who took over as coach of the Italian league runners-up this summer — was in charge of his first home game at the San Paolo Stadium. The 59-year-old’s side also trailed before getting past Lazio 2-1 in the season opener in Rome last weekend.AC Milan were playing their first match of the season after their game against Genoa was postponed because of the bridge disaster in the port city.But it was to be a bitter defeat for Milan coach Gattuso, 40, who played under Ancelotti when the latter was in charge of AC Milan, winning the Champions League together in 2007.Ancelotti praised the “great desire … to fight back vehemently,” by his side.“I have a fond memory of all my former players, but with Gattuso there is something special.“It’s a wonderful evening, one full of emotions for me.“Milan hadn’t really given many signs of being dangerous in attack, but surprised us with two goals.“It was very difficult in that situation, then we changed system and the crowd pushed us on to turn it around.”Ancelotti spent most of his career at AC Milan, winning three Serie A and four European titles as a player and coach with the northern giants.His last coaching job in Italy — before nine trophy-laden years abroad at clubs including Chelsea, Paris Saint-Germain, Real Madrid and Bayern Munich — was at the helm of Milan.AC Milan were playing their first match of the season after their game against Genoa was postponed because of the bridge disaster in the port city.Gattuso had said it was his dream to defeat his old “maestro” as Ancelotti had done as AC Milan coach over two decades ago beating his former boss Arrigo Sacchi’s Parma.“It hurts me to play so well at the San Paolo and then emerge empty-handed. Now we have to lick our wounds and go forward,” said Gattuso.Giacomo Bonaventura sensationally opened for Milan after 15 minutes with a Davide Calabria half-volley giving the visitors a two-goal advantage four minutes after the break.But Piotr Zielinski bagged a brace for Napoli in a 15-minute second half spell with substitute Dries Mertens sealing victory 10 minutes from time.“It’s acceptable to make a mistake but not to disappear from the pitch,” said Gattuso.“After we conceded the first goal we stopped playing.”Argentine striker Gonzalo Higuain made his competitive debut for Milan but had little impact in his old stadium, along with new on-loan Chelsea midfielder Tiemoue Bakayoko.Cristiano Ronaldo made his home debut for Juventus in a 2-0 win over Lazio, which after last week’s 3-2 win at Chievo gives the champions a maximum six points.Ronaldo is still waiting for his first goal with his new club with Miralem Pjanic putting the hosts in front at the Allianz Stadium after half an hour with Mario Mandzukic scoring the second on 75 minutes.Napoli play at Sampdoria next week with AC Milan looking for their first points at home against Roma, and Juventus travelling to promoted Parma.Lazio look for their first points against newcomers Frosinone.0Shares0000(Visited 3 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

FBI priorities go to the dogs

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORE11 theater productions to see in Southern California this week, Dec. 27-Jan. 2160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! ON April 13, I received a strange phone call at my Los Angeles home from an FBI Special Agent Instructor named Andy. It was strange because the FBI had never before contacted me. Did I breach some obscure statute? I remembered a book of “absurd laws,” which said that in my neighborhood it was illegal to spit on the sidewalk, drive in a housecoat or allow animals to mate publicly within 1,500 feet of a school or church. Had my little, white terrier been committing impure acts at Erwin Elementary? It turned out Special Agent Andy wanted me to fly to Quantico, Va., (near Washington D.C.) to lecture law-enforcement executives and managers from around the world about animal philosophy, keeping in mind “the mind-set and methodologies of terrorists and the government’s response.” It was an unusual request even for an animal-rights advocate, such as myself, with a doctorate in philosophy. So I did what anyone would do: I contacted my family, friends and criminal attorney. I don’t really have a criminal attorney, but I have a friend who regularly handles high-profile cases. He furrowed his bushy brow and cautioned, “Don’t do anything. Let me check this out first. The FBI railroads innocent people all the time.” My anxiety multiplied when an animal-rights activist friend person said, “only traitors talk to the government,” and a non-animal-rights activist friend advised me to take a lawyer with me and to refuse to “name names” when “testifying before the House Un-American Activities Committee.” “I don’t have any names,” I protested. I felt the real purpose behind the FBI’s invitation had to do with its misguided aim to infiltrate the Animal Liberation Front, which cannot be infiltrated because it is an ideology rather than an organization. There are no meetings, mailing lists or membership cards. Anybody can claim to be a member of the ALF when rescuing animals, destroying “tools of torture” (such as research equipment) or financially depleting a corporation that abuses animals; as long as he or she does not injure a human or nonhuman in the process. The FBI has designated the ALF as America’s No. 1 domestic terrorist threat, in spite of the fact that those acting on its behalf have never physically harmed anyone. The same cannot be said of unions, who have reportedly instigated 2,193 acts of violence in the last 10 years including near fatal injuries and anti-abortion activists who have made 13,256 attacks in the past three decades against doctors and clinics, including murders, kidnappings and bombings. By comparison, ALF-attributed actions are quite rare. In 2003, hate crimes in America totaled approximately 7,400 and recognized violations of environmental laws by corporations hit 450. Sen. Barak Obama, D-Ill., says he is baffled as to why the ALF is the foremost target, since the FBI itself has stated that ALF-attributed crimes are on the decline. Nonetheless, Decision day arrived, and my criminal attorney gave me the flickering yellow light, warning me that my visit would prompt the FBI to open a file on me. “Well, I plan to open a file on them, too,” I assured him. “But, I promise not to put any falsehoods in my file if they don’t put any falsehoods in theirs.” “Go if you want. It’s legit, but take my number in case.” My plan was to serve as an ambassador for the animal-rights movement and to convey through my lecture the truth about how animals suffer under human oppression, as well as to present philosophical arguments as to why animals are of equal value to humans and worthy of equal consideration. I wanted my audience to understand that anti-terrorism resources should be used to combat dangerous groups who fly planes into buildings, rather than renegade gerbil lovers. It would not be realistic to suggest that animal-related “crimes” be ignored, but I argued they should be de-prioritized in an age when chemical, biological and nuclear warfare are possible. My presentation began with undercover video footage inside a vivisection lab. It showed a man in a white coat pounding on a beagle puppy and forcing tubes down several dogs’ throats. The animals were clearly in distress. I surmised cleaning liquids or pesticides would be poured down the tubes since they were routinely tested at this lab. Andy shouted from the back of the room, “The FBI will prosecute this sort of cruelty if videos like this are brought to our attention.” I pointed out that obtaining undercover video is illegal in itself, even more so with the advent of the Animal Enterprise Terrorism Act, which states that a person can be prosecuted if he or she causes over $10,000 worth of economic damage to a corporation that uses animals. Showing undercover video could cause investors to sell their stocks, decimating profits. Those who unveil the video could face time in prison and fines. In addition, I told the crowd that it was unlikely that the barbarous treatment of dogs and monkeys in the footage was against the law. And even if it was, prosecution tends to result in nothing more than a slap on the wrist. Because animals are property, and the law generally finds it acceptable to use and kill animals for human gain, imposing prison terms and steep fines on large corporations who have even larger teams of lawyers is rare. During my lecture, I was able to get several law-enforcement executives to admit openly that they would break the law, if necessary, to rescue an animal in distress, although none went so far as to agree to break into a research lab or factory farm. This was quite an accomplishment because prior to the presentation, Andy had privately told me that any FBI agent who did not or could not (for ethical reasons) uphold all U.S. laws would be fired. My audience was mostly non-FBI, so they surely kept their jobs. After the lecture, Andy asked me, “Could you come back and speak again?” “I doubt it,” I said. “Unfortunately, I don’t fare well on long plane rides.” “Well,” he added, “maybe you could give me the name of someone who could?” I grinned and replied, “I knew you’d ask me to name names. I have no choice but to report this in my secret file.” Charlotte Laws is a member of the Greater Valley Glen Neighborhood Council and authors a chapter of the book, “Igniting a Revolution: Voices in Defense of Mother Earth.”last_img read more

HSE EXPRESSES MAJOR CONCERN THAT DONEGAL CHILDREN NOT BEING VACCINATED ON TIME

first_imgHealth care staff in Donegal are worried about the implications of the increasing number of children who have not had their vaccines on time. At present 16% of children are not receiving their 13 month vaccines and 50% are delaying their vaccines by up to 6 months.Most children are getting their first vaccines on time but from the age of 6 months the delays start. This means that a large number of children are at risk from serious illness, especially meningitis, by not getting the MenC and HiB vaccines at the correct time.Dr Anthony Breslin, Specialist in Public Health Medicine with the HSE North West said most children are vaccinated on time but it is worrying that over the last year a significant number of children are getting their vaccines very late.“Vaccines are given at a time when they will produce an immune response in a child and when the child is at the highest risk of an infection.“Not only is the MMR vaccine being delayed, which leaves a child open to infection from measles, mumps and rubella, but the two important meningitis vaccines, Men C and HiB, and being given very late.” Parents who want to ensure that their children are protected should contact their GP practice to arrange vaccination. HSE EXPRESSES MAJOR CONCERN THAT DONEGAL CHILDREN NOT BEING VACCINATED ON TIME was last modified: February 25th, 2013 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:DR ANTHONY BRESLINHSEVACCINATIONlast_img read more

Antelope Valley Calendar

first_imgTODAY J&J Social and Travel Club will host a dinner, 5:30 p.m. at Tokyo Steak, 1024 E. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call (661) 267-2586 by Friday. Nicotine Anonymous will meet, 8-9 p.m. at Seventh-day Adventist Church, 43824 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 946-7606. Buklod ng Pagkakaisa (Bond of Unity) Seniors’ Social Hour, 4-7 p.m. the first Sunday of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Meetings feature films, talks, singalongs, talent shows and dancing. Call (661) 723-7876 or (661) 726-5309. Costume Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the fourth Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5, students with identification are admitted free. Antelope Valley Chess Club will meet, 1-5 p.m. at American Legion Post 771, 39463 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 726-1323. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 5-6 p.m. at 44960 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. Call (661) 789-5806. MONDAY Beyond the Light, a socialization and support group for young adults, ages 17 to 25, with mental health issues, will meet, noon-1 p.m. at Transitional Youth Services, 104 E. Ave. K-4, Lancaster. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Snyders Dance Groove will give ballroom, Latin, country and swing dance lessons, 6-8:30 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. For ages 40 and up. Cost: $3 per person. Call (661) 609-6510. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Co-Dependents Anonymous Step Study will meet, 6-7 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927. 12 Step Recovery Groups for alcohol and drug addiction, co-dependency, relationship addiction, overeating, fear and anxiety issues, meets, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Recovery Inc., a self-help group for people with panic attacks, anxiety or depression, will meet, 2 p.m. at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster, third floor. Call (661) 943-3956. The Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo at 5:30 p.m. The grill will be open. Call (661) 947-2027. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6-7 p.m. at the Lancaster United Methodist Church, 918 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 722-0393. Co-Dependents Anonymous will host a 12-step recovery program, 7:30-9 p.m., at Antelope Valley Hospital, multipurpose meeting room, second floor, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 944-4927 or (661) 946-5846. Grief Recovery Outreach Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or visit www.frf.av.org. Adult Anger Management Group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. The Highs and Lows, a support group for those diagnosed with manic depression or related disorders, will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Al-Anon will have a discussion, 7 p.m. at 51st Street West and Avenue K, Lancaster. Child care provided. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Take Off Pounds Sensibly Chapter 572 will meet, 9-11 a.m. at the Mayflower Gardens chapel, 6570 W. Ave. L-12, Quartz Hill. Call (661) 943-3089. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6 p.m. with regular games beginning at 6:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Elks Lodge, 2705 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale. Call (661) 947-2027. Early bird bingo games will begin at 6:30 p.m. with regular games beginning at 7 p.m. at Paraclete High School, 42145 30th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 943-3255, Monday evenings: (661) 943-1017. Billiard Gang for seniors will meet, 9:15 a.m.-4 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Parent support group will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. The facilitated group is for parents who need help coping with family issues. Call (661) 266-8700. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 273-1016. Expectant parents can tour the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department, 1600 W. Ave. J in Lancaster, and get information on what to expect during hospitalization, at sessions starting at 6 p.m. Visitors meet in the main lobby. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.org. TUESDAY Prostate Cancer Support Group meets, 12:30 p.m. the third Tuesday of each month at Lutheran Church of the Master, 725 E. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call Susan Baker at (661) 273-2200. Toddler story time for children ages 2-6, 9:30 and 11:30 a.m. at Barnes & Noble, 39228 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 272-9134. Celebrate Discovery, a Christian-based 12-step program, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale United Methodist Church, 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale. Call (661) 947-3103. Jazzercise classes, 5:30-6:30 p.m. at George Lane Park, 5520 W. Ave. L-8 in Quartz Hill. Call (661) 722-7780. Lupus International Support Group meets, 6:30-8 p.m. the second Tuesday of each month in Palmdale. Call Danielle Duffey at (888) 532-2322, Ext. 4. Successful Anger Management course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Call (661) 538-1846. Sand Creek Orators, Toastmaster International meets, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at Hummel Hall, 2200 20th St. W., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Caregiver Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. in Conference Room 1 at Lancaster Community Hospital in Lancaster. Sponsored by ProCare Hospice. Call (661) 951-1146. Tears in My Heart Support Group will meet, 10:30 a.m.-noon and 5:30-7 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Rocketeers Toastmasters meets, 1:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at the Air Force Research Laboratory. Call Pam Raneri at (661) 275-5287. Pancho Barnes Composite Squadron 49, Civil Air Patrol, will meet, 6-8:30 p.m. at Rosamond Sky Park, 4171 Knox Ave., Rosamond. Call (760) 373-5771. Antelope Valley Archaeology Club will meet, 9:30-11 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5656. Grief Support Group will meet, 5:30-7 p.m. at the Hoffmann Hospice, 1832 W. Ave. K, Suite D-1. Call (661) 948-8801. Toastmasters Sand Creek Orators Club will meet, 7:30 p.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month at 2500 Orange St., Rosamond. Call Miik Miller at (661) 256-0328. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Snyders Dance Groove meets, 6-8:30 p.m. the first and second Tuesdays of each month at the Antelope Valley Senior Center, 777 W. Jackman St., Lancaster. Cost: $2. Call (661) 609-6510. Mothers of Preschoolers (MOPS) meets, 9-11:30 a.m. the second and fourth Tuesdays of each month for brunch, speakers and crafts at Central Christian Church, 3131 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Cost: $6 per meeting, plus $2 per child for child care. Scholarships are available. Call (661) 945-7902. 12 Step Recovery Group for alcohol and drug addiction will meet, 7 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian Fellowship, 1011 E. Ave. I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. American Indian Little League will meet, 7 p.m. at HomeTown Buffet, 422 W. Ave. P. Call Harry Richard at (661) 267-2259. High Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Tuesday of each month at Denny’s restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call (760) 240-4705. Grief/Bereavement Group will meet, 10 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. at ProCare Hospice, 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Youth Anger Management Group for ages 8-11 will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 38345 30th St. E., Suite A-2, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700 or (800) 479-CARE, or visit the Web site: www.frf.av.org. Plane Talk Toastmasters will meet, noon-1 p.m. at the Lockheed Federal Credit Union, 1011 Lockheed Way, Palmdale. Call (661) 572-4123. Harmony Showcase Chorus of Sweet Adelines International will rehearse, 7:30 p.m. at 44857 Cedar Ave., Lancaster. The group is part of an international organization of women who sing four-part harmony. Call (661) 273-0995, (661) 285-1797 or (661) 940-3109. Al-Anon will hold a discussion, noon at 1737 E. Ave. R, Room 104, Palmdale, and at 7 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, Room 704, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. Cardio Knockout Blast, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiards Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Health Insurance Counseling and Advocacy Program representative will be available, 1-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551 for an appointment. Tumbleweed Card Club for seniors will play canasta, pinochle and other games, 1-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Line dancing, 6-7 p.m. for beginners and 7-8:30 p.m. for intermediate dancers at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Palmdale Youth Council will meet, 5:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Parks and Recreation office, 38260 10th St. E., Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5611. Sierra Club will offer one- to two-hour conditioning hikes leaving at 6 p.m. from the Palmdale Park and Ride lot, Avenue S at the Antelope Valley Freeway. Moderately conditioned beginning hikers are welcome. Call (661) 273-2761. Expectant parent tours of the Antelope Valley Hospital obstetrics department will start at 6 p.m. from the hospital lobby, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 7-9 p.m. at Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1821 W. Lancaster Blvd., Lancaster. Beginners will meet at 7 p.m. Call (661) 948-2571. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 10:30 a.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38530 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 274-4178. Also in Lancaster, 6:30 p.m. at Sunnydale School, 1233 W. Ave. J-8. Call Karen at (661) 723-9331. Overeaters Anonymous – HOW Concept! will meet, 7:15 p.m. at Robin’s Law Office, 203 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 949-9192. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.sava-na.com. WEDNESDAY J&J Social and Travel Club will host a games snack night, 7 o’clock in Lancaster. Bring food to share and a beverage. Call (661) 267-2586 or (661) 946-5222. Sweet Talkers Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. in the Wilsona School District boardroom, 18050 E. Ave. 0, Lake Los Angeles. Call (661) 944-1216 or 944-1130. Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3000 will serve specialty meals, or hamburger baskets, 5:30-8 p.m. at the post, 4342 W. Ave. L, Quartz Hill. Proceeds will benefit community affairs. Members, guests and public welcome. Call (661) 943-2225. Kids Managing Anger Together for ages 13-17 will meet, 4:30-6 p.m. at 38345 30th St. E., Suite. B-1, Palmdale. Court approved. Call (661) 266-8700. Low-cost Facilitated Women’s Group will deal with the death of a loved one, divorce, loss of relationship, infertility and other issues, noon-1:30 p.m. Call (661) 266-8700. Fobi-Lyte Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month to address the medical, nutritional and social ramifications of weight-loss surgery in fourth-floor Conference Room 16 at Antelope Valley Outpatient Imaging Center, 44105 15th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 723-5123. Caregivers Support Group meets, 7-8:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at Los Angeles Caregiver Resource Center, 44421 10th St. W., Suite I, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-4852. Take Off Pounds Sensibly will meet, 9-10:30 a.m. Call (661) 272-0207 or (661) 947-7672. Eye Opener Toastmasters Club will meet, 7-8:30 a.m. at Denny’s Restaurant, 2005 W. Ave. K, Lancaster. Call Al Moore at (661) 726-3627. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente. Call Alan Strech at (661) 940-4640. Scrapbookers Club will meet, 5-7 p.m. at Peldyns, 27021 Twenty Mule Team Road, Boron. Free tools for use. Bring book and photos. Call (760) 608-1422. Antelope Valley Intertribal Council meeting, 7 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 38350 Sierra Highway, Palmdale. Call (661) 435-0423. AIDS-related death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Sudden-death support group meets, 5:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wednesdays of each month at 42442 10th St. W., Suite D, Lancaster. Call (661) 951-1146. Dual Recovery Anonymous, an informal 12-step group for mental health consumers with a history of substance abuse, will meet, 3 p.m. at the Antelope Valley Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G. Call (661) 947-1595. Antelope Valley Interfaith Choir will meet, 6:30-8 p.m. For adults and mature teenagers. Call Kathe Walters at (661) 285-8306. Hi-Desert Woodworkers Club meets, 6:30 p.m. the first Wednesday of each month at Don’s Restaurant, Victorville. Call (760) 240-4705. Schizophrenics Anonymous will meet, 2 p.m. at the Discovery Center, 1609 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite G, Palmdale. Call Bill Slocum at (661) 947-1595 or (661) 319-5101. Belly dancing classes, 7-9 p.m. at the Alpine Grange, 8650 E. Ave. T-8, Littlerock. Lessons: $2. Call (661) 944-1747. Desert Noon Lions Club meets, noon-1 p.m. the first and third Wednesdays of each month at the California Pantry, 120 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Call Barbara at (661) 947-4079. Successful Marriage and Parenting course, 7-9 p.m. in Lancaster. Free. For information and location, call (661) 538-1846. Emotions Anonymous will meet, 7-8:30 p.m. in the multipurpose meeting room on the second floor at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. The organization is a 12-step, self-help group. Call (661) 943-5466. Little Angels, a support group for families with young children with Down syndrome, meets, 6:30 p.m. the third Wednesday of each month at the North Los Angeles County Regional Center, 43210 Gingham Ave., Lancaster. Call Cyndee Moore at (661) 945-6761 or e-mail cyndeem@nlacrc.com, or visit the Web site at www.geocities.com/littleangels_angelitos. Al-Anon discussion group will meet, 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale; Alateen at 7 p.m. at 39055 10th St. W., Palmdale, and a women’s discussion group at 7:30 p.m. at 32142 Crown Valley Road, Acton. Call (661) 274-9353 or (800) 344-2666. A Course in Miracles discussion, 7-9 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 10 a.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Bridge Club for seniors will meet, noon-3 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Beginner and intermediate players welcome. Call (661) 267-5551. Blood pressure testing for seniors, 10-11:15 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Billiard Gang for seniors, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Call (661) 267-5551. Flex and stretch, a workout for seniors, 8-9 a.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Bring a floor mat and hand weights. Call (661) 267-5551. Knitting and crocheting for seniors, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. at the Larry Chimbole Cultural Center, 704 E. Palmdale Blvd., Palmdale. Bring your own supplies. Call (661) 267-5551. Compulsive Eaters Anonymous – HOW Concept will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Palmdale Children’s Youth Library, 38510 Sierra Highway. Call Kathy at (661) 265-1839. Overeaters Anonymous will meet, 6:30-7:30 p.m. in Multipurpose Room 2 at Antelope Valley Hospital, 1600 W. Ave. J, Lancaster. Call (661) 256-7064. Hotline: (661) 789-5806. Women’s Eating Disorder Group will meet, 6-7:30 p.m. at Family Resource Foundation, 1529 E. Palmdale Blvd., Suite 203, Palmdale. Call (661) 266-8700. Bingo for seniors, 12:15-2:15 p.m. at the Palmdale Senior Center, 1002 E. Ave. Q-12, Palmdale. Cost: 25 cents per card. Call (661) 267-5551. Talents Unlimited Toastmasters will meet, 7 p.m. at Kaiser Permanente Mental Health Center, 44444 20th St. W., Lancaster. Call (661) 949-7423. Narcotics Anonymous: For meeting times and locations, call (661) 266-2200 or check www.todayna.org 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set!center_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORERose Parade grand marshal Rita Moreno talks New Year’s Day outfit and ‘West Side Story’ remake 40 and Up Singles dance, 6:30 p.m. Sunday at 240 E. Avenue K, Lancaster. Admission: $7. Club membership: $20. Call (661) 718-8997. Life Figure Sessions, 2:30-5:30 p.m. the second Sunday of each month at Cedar Centre Hall, 44857 Cedar Ave. Cost: $5, students with ID are admitted free. Teen Care and Support Group, for teens who have lost a family member or friend, will meet, 6:30 p.m. at Desert Vineyard Christian School, 1011 E. Ave. I, Room 302, Lancaster. Call (661) 945-2777. Palmdale Moose Lodge, 3101 E. Ave. Q, Palmdale, will host bingo games beginning at 1 p.m. Call (661) 947-6777. Revealing Truth, a meditation and spiritual discussion, 4:45-6:15 p.m. Call (661) 723-9967. last_img read more