It all comes down to cost, analysts argue: Carbon capture simply too expensive

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享OilPrice.com:Coal usage continues to fall, and the coal industry wants to do something about that. So does the Trump administration. Their proposed solution to the problem of waning coal usage is carbon capture and sequestration (CCS)—a technology that has been around for a long time.The basic idea behind CCS is to remove the carbon dioxide from the exhaust stream after burning the coal. Then the “captured” CO2 can be redirected. But in the US, the Southern Company and others attempted to develop an additional process. Their ultimate goal was to use cheap and plentiful Mississippi lignite and convert it chemically into clean-burning synthetic gas. The CO2 produced from combustion would also be captured. One actual use is to pump CO2 into older, less productive oil field reservoirs to enhance oil recovery. One suggestion is to replace the oil with CO2 storage after the field has been depleted.Abroad, the giant coal miners (as opposed to the smaller American ones that have been skirting bankruptcy) launched Coal21 in Australia (where coal mining is a huge business) to do research and lobbying. The International Energy Agency argues that half the world’s coal-fired power plants are under 15 years in age, so sequestration will be required in order to reduce the world’s carbon emissions (one-third of which are from burning coal).Leaving aside the question of whether past (not fully depreciated) power plant investment should influence future decisions (the sunk cost issue), the real policy question is: what are we doing—limiting greenhouse gas emissions at the lowest possible cost or saving the coal industry?The problem simply is that electricity produced by coal-fired plants using the latest CCS technology is several times the cost of other existing carbon-free technologies. With respect to a commodity product like electricity, these numbers are politically and financially untenable. To overly simplify, coal is already losing on price to wind. The CCS advocates propose to double the price of coal (from about 3 to at least 6 cents per kWh).At the end of the day, sequestration technologies fail to answer a simple question. Why add sequestration technology and the attendant costs when coal is already becoming increasingly uncompetitive as a boiler fuel relative to wind (which only costs 2 cents/kWh to produce)?More: Coal’s last hope: Carbon capture tech It all comes down to cost, analysts argue: Carbon capture simply too expensivelast_img read more

School starts tomorrow, parents celebrate

first_imgby Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow – Just a reminder: Wellington schools start tomorrow.The first official day for the 2016-17 school year is Tuesday for all elementary, middle school and freshman students. New high school students must also attend.Then on Wednesday, all sophomores, juniors and seniors at Wellington High School will start classes.Other dates to remember:Tonight – Wellington Middle School will be holding an open house on tonight for students and parents from 6 to 7 p.m.There is also an information meeting at the Wellington High School for students enrolled in a Cowley Community College course for the fall semester. Students are encouraged to attend with their parents on Monday at 6:30 p.m.Don’t forget about the hamburger scrimmage on Thursday for the football and volleyball team.The schedule is as follows:Football6 p.m. – youth.6:30 p.m. – middle school.7 p.m. – high school.Volleyball6 p.m. – Volleyball scrimmage at middle school. 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Thank you for your input. 0 Vote up Vote down SixDollarsForBooks · 207 weeks ago We went to the open house at the middle school tonight. We stopped by the library and the librarian told us they didn’t get any new books! I’m already disappointed that I have to take my child to the public library because the books at the middle school have such low reading levels. Why didn’t the library get new books? How can we keep our children interested in reading if we’re not offering them new and trending material? Why does the library not have higher than 6-7th grade level books? The librarian said there’s no money for books. NO MONEY FOR BOOKS?!? But there’s money for a new drive way. There’s money for a new independent gym building. I guess at least we look nice and our athletes are taken care of. Who cares if they’re not well educated. Solution: part of the school fees for our “free” public school system includes $6 for a towel for PE. I’d be happy to provide my own towel and let that $6 go towards something my child would actually benefit from. This is crazy…who comes up with this stuff? Report Reply 0 replies · active 207 weeks ago +1 Vote up Vote down Sarah House · 207 weeks ago There are new books, just not a huge, end of the year order. The middle school library receives about 12 new books every month, which are put out to students as soon as possible. I don’t consider those a new book order, but rather a subscription that comes on a monthly basis, much like a magazine you would receive at home. As for the comment about nothing higher than a 6th or 7th grade reading level, there are several reasons for this. There are many books above this reading level at the MS, but most are nonfiction, a genre that is not most students first choice. Another factor is subject matter appropriateness. There is a great variance between what might be appropriate for a 6th grader and what might be appropriate for an 8th grader. I try to pick books that appeal to this wide range that would be appropriate for all students in the building. Yet one more factor is what authors write. A functional reading level in the US is between 6th and 8th grade, which is where most Young Adult authors write. I think most people would be surprised at the reading level of the “adult” books they read, because authors target the 6th-8th grade level, even for adult books. Our goal at the MS library is to encourage students to select books that appeal to their interest and become more independent in their selection process. Our vision is to help the right book get the right kid at the right time. We have a book fair every year that has the potential to books on our shelves, but that potential is dependent on students and parents purchasing from the book fair. If you have further questions or comments about this issue, I would be glad to talk to you more about it. Report Reply 0 replies · active 207 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more