Metropolitan Hotel Shut Down over US$51,740 Unpaid Loans

first_imgMetropolitan Plaza Hotel, situated on Broad Street, Monrovia, was last Thursday shut down by the Commercial Court for defaulting on a US$51,740 loan from Global Bank-Liberia Limited.The hotel’s closure was a result of the final judgment entered against the hotel by the court on November 13, 2013.The bank said it loaned or guaranteed Metropolitan Plaza US$99,000 before the lawsuit, of which US$51,740 is still owned by the company.A.N. Charifz, general manager of the hotel and loan guarantor, was nowhere to be found when the court’s officers went to close it down following a “Writ of Execution” issued by Resident Chief Judge Eva Mappy Morgan, last Thursday.In the execution order, Judge   Morgan instructed her court   officers that, “If Charifz fails to comply with the order, they   should arrest him for contempt of court consistent with 1LCL Revised Chapter 44- enforcement of judgment and orders.”The court further ordered Charifz to pay Global Bank the sum of money necessary to satisfy the judgment adding that “if the money that would be realized from sale of the company’s properties is not sufficient to pay the reasonable expenses, then seize the real properties until it shall have raised the sum of US$51,740.”Judge Morgan also instructed court officers to seize and expose for sale land, goods and chattels of the management of Metropolitan Plaza Hotel.”Immediately, after the sudden closure of the hotel, an employee was heard phoning his fellow workers shouting,” Oh, guys the government has closed the hotel. We and our customers have been left in the cold, especially in this festive Season,”According to financial experts, non-payment on bank loans by business institutions could jeopardize the entire financial system of the country,   especially in the post- Ebola recovery period.In August 2013, Global Bank Liberia Limited filed a case in the Commercial Court to recover US$99,000 from Metropolitan Plaza in unpaid loans and interests due the bank.After the company was sued for non-payment, the court ruled on November 3, 2013 that the company was not paying the US$99,000 loan in compliance with the agreement and authorized the bank to sell the company’s mortgaged properties to recover the outstanding debts.The court at the time also ordered the company to settle the outstanding debt within a few months, which it failed to do up to the hotel’s closure last Thursday.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)last_img read more

EFS checklist provides userfriendly tool for evaluating feeding skills in preterm infants

first_img Source:http://home.lww.com/news.entry.html/2018/09/21/checklist_helps_asse-dthg.html Reviewed by Kate Anderton, B.Sc. (Editor)Sep 21 2018Infants born prematurely face challenges in developing the complex, interrelated skills needed for effective feeding. An assessment called the Early Feeding Skills (EFS) checklist is a valid and reliable tool for evaluating the emergence of feeding skills in preterm infants, reports a study in Advances in Neonatal Care, official journal of the National Association of Neonatal Nurses. The journal is published in the Lippincott portfolio by Wolters Kluwer.The EFS provides a user-friendly tool for assessing and monitoring feeding skills in premature infants and other infants at risk of feeding problems – and for guiding interventions to promote the skills needed to feed successfully, according to the new research, led by Suzanne Thoyre, PhD, RN, FAAN, of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing.Study Formally Evaluates Checklist for Assessing Feeding in Preterm InfantsLearning how to feed safely and effectively is particularly challenging for premature infants and those with medical problems requiring care during the newborn (neonatal) period. Establishment of oral feeding is often a key factor in determining when premature infants can go home from the hospital.The EFS is a 22-item checklist developed to assess oral feeding skills in infants feeding by breast or bottle. In the study, registered nurses, speech-language pathologists, and occupational therapists used the EFS to evaluate the feeding skills of 142 infants at children’s hospitals in three states. Three-fourths of the infants were born prematurely; some were full-term infants who had undergone heart surgery.Using a method called factor analysis, the researchers identified a set of five subscales measured by the EFS: respiratory regulation, or the ability to coordinate breathing and sucking; the ability to organize oral-motor function; swallowing coordination; staying engaged with feeding; and remaining physiologically stable during feeding. Together, these factors explained about 58 percent of the variation in the EFS score; the single strongest factor was respiratory regulation.Related StoriesResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairAXT enhances cellular research product portfolio with solutions from StemBioSysOlympus Europe and Cytosurge join hands to accelerate drug development, single cell researchComparison with other assessments established that the EFS is valid and reliable — “meaning that we can count on the tool to consistently measure what it purports to measure,” according to the authors. Premature infants with later gestational ages had higher total EFS scores and higher scores on the respiratory regulation and physiologic stability subscales.”For preterm infants and those with medical complexities, early feeding skills are in a state of emergence while receiving neonatal care,” Dr. Thoyre and coauthors write. “Selecting appropriate and supportive interventions begins with thorough assessment of the infant’s skills.”Previous assessments have focused on the volume of feeding or individual skills, but this overlooks the complex interplay of skills needed for effective feeding. Although the EFS has been in use for more than a decade, the new study is the first formal evaluation of its psychometric properties.”The EFS provides a reliable and valid way to systematically observe and record the maturation of [infants’] feeding skills and guides the selection of interventions to optimally support their skill trajectory,” Dr. Thoyre and colleagues conclude. They suggest that further studies using the EFS could add to understanding of neonatal feeding skill development.​last_img read more