National Geographic Renews Legal War Over Digital Archive

first_imgLawyers for National Geographic were in the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals in Atlanta late last week to argue what they have been arguing for years: that the Complete National Geographic, a pioneering CD-ROM project the magazine released in 1997, does not violate the intellectual property rights of freelance photographers whose work first appeared in print.“It’s the archive that’s at stake,” Angelo Grima, senior vice president and deputy general counsel for the National Geographic Society, said during a panel on digital rights at the Magazine Publishers of America’s Magazines 24/7 conference at the Hearst Tower Thursday. “We’ll go to the Supreme Court if we have to, because our archive is that important to us.”The litigation, now entering its 11th year, has seen more twists than a John Grisham novel. The 11th Circuit first ruled in 2001 in favor of Jerry Greenberg, a freelance photographer whose work had appeared in National Geographic (in 1962, 1968 and 1971) and then on CD. Subsequent cases in the 2nd Circuit ruled in favor of National Geographic. In 2004, a Florida judge awarded Greenburg $400,000 in damages; National Geographic appealed. Last year, a three-judge panel of the 11th Circuit overruled the 2001 decision in favor of National Geographic, but Greenburg asked for—and was granted—a full court review. National Geographic was forced to pull the 30-disc CD-ROM set off the market five years ago. Grima anticipates the court will take three to five months to come to a decision.The New Yorker Looks On It’s a case that the New Yorker is watching very carefully. Condé Nast released the magazine’s complete digital archive on DVD (“The Complete New Yorker”) in 2005. Playboy and Rolling Stone released DVD versions of their own archives last year.“There’s always been this tension between what we get and what contributors retain,” said Edward Klaris, Condé Nast’s vice president of editorial assets and rights. Klaris pointed to columnists whose New Yorker pieces are turned into books or films. “The balance is [writers] get to exploit their work, and we do too.”“We went ahead with the New Yorker project knowing some risk,” Klaris admitted. “The magazine has some very deep-pocketed contributors,” but largely received their support, he said.Grima told FOLIO: that if National Geographic was to win the latest case—and assured the ruling would hold—the company would likely update the archive to put it back on the market.The case also has implications for other potential platforms for magazine archives—namely, the Internet. If the court rules against National Geographic in Atlanta, Klaris said, magazines would be hard-pressed to distribute their archives on DVDs in that region or, technically, over the Web—where Klaris sees digital archived versions of magazines going.Going forward, both executives said, digital rights are clearly defined in their contracts with freelancers.The Greenberg case bears a striking resemblance to Tasini v. the New York Times, a landmark 2001 Supreme Court decision that ruled in favor of freelance writers seeking digital rights. Greenberg’s attorneys have argued that the precedent set by the Supreme Court in the Tasini case should support their client’s copyright claims against National Geographic.last_img read more

Amazon to fund 10M to improve fairness in AI research

first_img Now playing: Watch this: Share your voice 5:11 Sci-Tech Tech Industry Post a comment 0center_img Tags Amazon wants funded projects to broaden acceptance of AI systems.  Ben Fox Rubin/CNET Amazon is giving money to broaden AI acceptance. The e-commerce giant on Monday said it’s working with the US National Science Foundation to give a total of $10 million in research grants over the next three years to help improve fairness in artificial intelligence.”We believe we must work closely with academic researchers to develop innovative solutions that address issues of fairness, transparency and accountability and to ensure that biases in data don’t get embedded in the systems we create,” Prem Natarajan, vice president and head scientist of Alexa at Amazon, wrote in a blog post. “Funded projects will help to enable broadened acceptance of AI systems, helping the US further capitalize on the potential of AI technologies.”This comes as Amazon faces criticism for selling Rekognition, facial recognition software that relies on AI and machine learning, to law enforcement agencies. Civil liberties groups, such as the ACLU, have raised concerns about the speedy adoption of facial recognition tech among US law enforcement agencies and the potential for its abuse, particularly against immigrants and people of color.Amazon said specific topics of interest for its funding program with the NSF include transparency, explainability, accountability, potential biases and effects, inclusiveness and fairness in AI technology. Interested researchers can submit their letters of intent by May 10. Facial recognition: Get to know the tech that gets to… Amazon Facial recognitionlast_img read more

Uber is elevating its UberAir pilot program to include Melbourne Australia

first_img 2020 BMW M340i review: A dash of M makes everything better Share your voice 2020 Hyundai Palisade review: Posh enough to make Genesis jealous 2020 Kia Telluride review: Kia’s new SUV has big style and bigger value More From Roadshow Now playing: Watch this: UberAir is planning on taking to the skies over Melbourne by 2020, even if that seems highly ambitious to us. Uber For some reason that we can’t fully grasp, people continue to look to flying cars as a valid means of transportation in the future. Uber has really doubled down on this idea, having already named Los Angeles and Dallas as pilot cities for its UberAir aerial rideshare program, announced on Tuesday that it is adding a third city: Melbourne, Australia.The really wild part is that Uber plans on starting test flights as early as 2020 and hopes to have the program commercially viable and available to the public by 2023 — which, if you couldn’t tell, is an incredibly short timeline.So, why Melbourne? It’s not Australia’s largest or most cosmopolitan city, though it’s reasonably close on both counts. We wouldn’t put it past Uber to just be huge Kylie Minogue or Dirty Three fans though.”Australian governments have adopted a forward-looking approach to ride-sharing and future transport technology,” Susan Anderson, regional general manager for Uber in Australia, New Zealand and North Asia, said in a statement. “This, coupled with Melbourne’s unique demographic and geospatial factors and culture of innovation and technology, makes Melbourne the perfect third launch city for Uber Air. We will see other Australian cities following soon after.”A large part of Uber’s plan to take to the skies involves the development of electric helicopterlike aircraft that will be both ecologically friendly and significantly quieter than traditional helicopters, both because of their lack of noisy turbine engines and because they will use multiple smaller rotors to provide lift, rather than a single large one.To get these craft designed, built and approved by governmental agencies within its highly truncated time frame, Uber has partnered with several established aerospace companies, including Boeing subsidiary Aurora Flight Sciences, EmbraerX, Pipistrel Vertical Solutions and Bell. Skai could be the first hydrogen-powered eVTOL 0center_img Post a comment Tags Roadshow Sci-Tech 8 Photos All of the electric urban aircraft unveiled at Uber Elevate 2018 2:03 Uberlast_img read more

Hindi has bright future in Bangladesh Shringla

first_imgIndian High Commissioner in Dhaka Harsh Vardhan Shringla and Dhaka University vice-chancellor professro Md Akhtaruzzaman attend a programme at the Institute of Modern Languages marking World Hindi Day on 10 January. Photo: UNBHindi language has a bright future in Bangladesh as many people of this country regularly watch Hindi serials and movies on the television, said Indian High Commissioner in Dhaka Harsh Vardhan Shringla on Wednesday.“These people understand Hindi language although they can’t read or write,” he said while presiding over a programme at the Institute of Modern Languages (IML) of Dhaka University, reports UNB.Indira Gandhi Cultural Centre (IGCC) and the IML jointly organised the programme marking the World Hindi Day.Shringla said the Hindi department of IML has created a great opportunity for those who are interested to know about the Hindi language and culture.“The relation between the people of Bangladesh and India will be more strong and deep,” he said.DU vice-chancellor professor Md Akhtaruzzaman attended the event as the chief guest.IML director professor Shishir Bhattacharya also addressed the programme.last_img read more

Elusive pygmy right whale found to be member of long thought extinct

first_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. More information: The pygmy right whale Caperea marginata: the last of the cetotheres, Published online December 19, 2012. doi: 10.1098/rspb.2012.2645AbstractThe pygmy right whale, Caperea marginata, is the most enigmatic of the living baleen whales (Mysticeti). Its highly disparate morphology and the virtual absence of a described fossil record have made it extremely difficult to place Caperea into a broader evolutionary context, and molecular and morphological studies have frequently contradicted each other as to the origins and phylogenetic relationships of the species. Our study of a wealth of material from New Zealand collections, representing a wide range of ontogenetic stages, has identified several new features previously unreported in Caperea, which suggest that the pygmy right whale may be the last survivor of the supposedly extinct family Cetotheriidae. This hypothesis is corroborated by both morphology-based and total evidence cladistic analyses, including 166 morphological characters and 23 taxa, representing all the living and extinct families of toothless baleen whales. Our results allow us to formally refer Caperea to Cetotheriidae, thus resurrecting the latter from extinction and helping to clarify the origins of a long-problematic living species. Citation: Elusive pygmy right whale found to be member of long thought extinct group (2012, December 21) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2012-12-elusive-pygmy-whale-member-thought.html World’s rarest whale seen for the first time Explore further (Phys.org)—Researchers in New Zealand have found that the pygmy right whale (Caperea marginata) is not a right whale at all but is instead a member of the cetotheres family of baleen whales, which until now have been believed to be extinct. The team reports on its finding in a paper they’ve had published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B.center_img The pygmy right whale (Caperea marginata). Credit: Wikipedia. Journal information: Proceedings of the Royal Society B Pygmy right whales live in the southern hemispheric oceans far from land and are rarely seen, thus compared to other whales, very little is known about them. They’re also small, growing to a length of just 21 feet and have a very unique arched snout and mouth; appearing as if an upside down grin. Scientists had previously thought the whale was a member of the humpback or bowhead family, as its appearance more resembled those than other baleens.Helping to clarify things, was a pygmy right whale carcass found on a beach in New Zealand in 2002. This new research is based on those remains and on the limited number of other bone samples that have been obtained. A DNA analysis made along with head measurements showed that the whale is in fact a member of the Cetotheriidae family of whales which scientists believed had been extinct for perhaps 2 million years. Because of that the researchers refer to the pygmy right whale as a “living fossil.”The whale is the smallest of the baleen family, and the most reclusive. So much so that scientists know very little about its habits such as what they eat, mate, how they behave etc. and can’t even guess as to how many of them there are alive today. The DNA analysis revealed that the whales evolved approximately nine million years ago, during a time when several other species of the family existed. It’s not known why the others died out while the pygmy was able to survive, but its existence today offers scientists a unique opportunity to study an animal that exists today much as did it and its relatives millions of years ago – if they can find some live specimens to study, of course. © 2012 Phys.orglast_img read more

TMC will win all 42 seats Abhishek

first_imgKolkata: Senior leaders were all praises for TMC supremo Mamata Banerjee’s efforts to groom the party in a unique manner streamlining political ambitions with productive work for “Maa, Mati, Manush,” creating a totally new breed of leaders who are now more sensitive to people’s issues and work extremely hard to bring to reality the Chief Minister’s dreams of making Bengal the number one state in the country in all aspects. In this new breed of leaders is her own nephew Abhishek who is presently the TMC Youth Congress president. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flightsAt the release of ‘Nisshabda Biplob’ (Silent Revolution), a report card of Abhishek Banerjee’s works as an MP of Diamond Harbour, senior TMC leaders were all praises for his achievements. Praising him, TMC secretary general Partha Chatterjee who is also the state Education minister said on Tuesday: “Mamata Banerjee has worked tirelessly for people’s rights from the very start of her college life and has been an inspiration for all of us. She has been the torch-bearer and Abhishek has learnt from her how to systematically organise the party. He has instilled the thoughts of the younger generation within the party.” Expressing his optimism about the next Lok Sabha elections, Abhishek said that the TMC will be able to win all the 42 seats. He also slammed the Centre for the rise in petrol and diesel prices as well as cooking gas and announced that protest movements would continue throughout the state.last_img read more