COLEMAN NAMED EVERTON YOUNG PLAYER OF THE YEAR

first_imgKILLYBEGS soccer star Seamus Coleman is celebrating today after being named Everton’s young player of the year.The 22-year-old Donegal man will make an incredible 40th appearance of the season when his side entertain Chelsea at Goodison Park on Sunday.He has started 30 of those games – and scored six goals for his club. And last night in Liverpool, Seamus picked up two gongs – young player of the year – and shareholders’ player of the year.Manager David Moyes said “Seamus did tremendously well at Blackpool last season and he’s given us something fresh and new this year.“He’s been great and, with what we’ve seen, we hope he’ll be able to step up again.”The former St Catherine’s and Sligo Rovers player won’t end his season against Chelsea however. He is expected to feature for Ireland when they play the North in the Carling Nations Cup next Tuesday – and Scotland on Sunday week.Said Seamus after the ceremony: “I’m trying to pick up different things but I don’t want to lose that natural ability.“I just like being able to get it and go. It’s done me well so far, so hopefully that can continue to be the case. I haven’t had a whole load of coaching. I just go for it. I want to get past my full-back. If I don’t do it the first time, I’ll keep trying.“It’s still there a little bit, that feeling that it’s all a bit surreal. I’ve said to myself that I’ve got to get rid of that because you can’t always think that way. At the same time, I don’t want to get used to it. I still want to have that little feeling of being in awe because you can never take your place for granted.”COLEMAN NAMED EVERTON YOUNG PLAYER OF THE YEAR was last modified: May 20th, 2011 by gregShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:evertonKillybegsseamus colemanlast_img read more

Why the FAA is Paying for New Hiking Trails In Juneau

first_imgThe Southeast Alaska Land Trust plans to donate about 128 acres of land to the City and Borough of Juneau this fall for preservation and natural recreation. The deal is technically an airport project—most of the money the land trust used to get the land in the first place traces back to the Federal Aviation Administration.Listen now: The land is in the Mendenhall Valley, bounded by residential subdivisions to the north, city-owned land that hugs the Mendenhall River to the east, public land to the south and Montana Creek to the west.“It’s mostly really rich wetlands, and they would just be left alone,” says Greg Chaney, Juneau’s lands and resources manager.The trust’s donation will be contingent on the preservation of the land as open space and for natural recreation. The plan is for new hiking trails, and possibly an overnight campsite and community garden.“Basically, the west bank of the Mendenhall River will be an entire network of city trails….For a community of our size, it’s an incredible trail network. And this is the capstone, I mean, this has been years in the making,” Chaney says.The reason this is connected to the FAA has to do with years of runway safety improvements at Juneau’s airport, which wrapped up in December. Basically, the FAA required more flat land around the runway, which meant filling in the surrounding wetlands.Frank Rue, executive director of the Southeast Alaska Land Trust, explains what happened next.“The Army Corps of Engineers required that they mitigate those wetlands’ impacts. And they chose to do it through the in-lieu fee program,” he says.The FAA paid for more than 90 percent of the roughly $85 million runway safety work. Then, the airport paid the land trust $5 million to deal with its wetlands debt. Rue says approximately 86 acres of wetlands were lost, which translated into an obligation to preserve 227 acres of wetlands.Federal law discourages destroying wetlands because they’re ecologically prized for their ability to naturally filter man-made pollution, provide flood relief and support unique ecosystems.The land deal in the Mendenhall Valley will knock out about half of the mitigation debt. The details aren’t set, but it’s consistent with the city’s long-term land use plans for the area, which includes improving a rough trail that follows Montana Creek. The Juneau Assembly must finalize the transfer.The Juneau Assessor’s database lists the property’s value at $20,000.“That because for the city’s purposes, it’s a conservation lot,” Rue says. “They don’t value it as a lot that’s available for development.”Rue won’t disclose how much the trust paid for the parcel–just that it was a much higher market rate before development was off-limits.last_img read more