VUCA leading to travel disruptions Virtuoso flash poll

first_img<< Previous PostNext Post >> Share Travelweek Group VUCA leading to travel disruptions: Virtuoso flash poll Tags: Trend Watch, Virtuosocenter_img Posted by NEW YORK — A new Virtuoso flash survey has found travellers are avoiding certain worldwide destinations as a result of the uncertainty tied to specific countries and global regions. VUCA stands for ‘volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous’, as a means of describing the potential travel disruptions caused by geopolitical situations.“The world is going through a transition where uncertainty is the new norm,” says Matthew D. Upchurch, Chairman and CEO of Virtuoso. “Whether it’s Brexit, the shifting political climate in the U.S., or the threat of terrorism or disease such as Zika, there seems to be only two certainties. First, we have no idea what we might wake up to find tomorrow because change happens fast. Two, and this is of utmost importance, travel is the best way to bring people together when isolation begins. At Virtuoso, we say borders divide, but travel unites. Never has it been more important to keep the ability to travel as a fundamental right.”More news:  TRAVELSAVERS welcomes Julie Virgilio to the teamAmong the questions asked, Virtuoso surveyed its travel advisors globally to discover the impact of the Presidential Executive Order disallowing travellers from seven countries to enter the U.S.Although the order is not currently in effect, Virtuoso advisors report that it is still impacting clients’ travel decisions.Among U.S.-based advisors, 10% say clients are changing travel plans due to a concern over anti-American sentiment. Some 40% say their clients are now avoiding certain destinations due to concerns over terrorism including the Middle East, Europe and Africa. They report that clients are choosing to travel within the U.S. as well as visit those perceived as safer, including Japan, Canada and New Zealand.Among Virtuoso-affiliated travel advisors outside of the U.S., 42% say their clients are avoiding travel to the U.S. due to factors including opposition to the country’s foreign policy and concerns over obtaining visas. As an alternative, they are electing to travel to destinations such as Italy, Australia and the U.K. The majority of advisors anticipate the slowdown in travel to the U.S. will last three to six months. Tuesday, March 28, 2017 last_img read more

New York New York – Reported by Elite Traveler t

first_imgNew York, New York – Reported by Elite Traveler, the private jet lifestyle magazineIn 1774, Pierre Jaquet-Droz (1721-1790), his son Henri-Louis Jaquet-Droz (1752-1791) and their fellow clockmaker Jean-Frédéric Leschot (1746-1824) presented three humanoid automata known as The Writer, The Musician and The Draughtsman, for the first time at their workshop in La Chaux-de-Fonds. Visitors traveled great distances to admire it. Already renowned in Europe for the quality and complexity of their horological creations, the Jaquet-Droz father and son team took advantage of this success to get a firm foothold on the international market. The automata presented in 1774 were instrumental to this expansion, serving as a very effective vehicle for communication and marketing.Astute businessmen, Pierre and Henri-Louis Jaquet-Droz traveled through Europe with their automata, holding demonstrations at many courts of Europe from 1774 on. They made their way to the court of Louis XVI in Paris, Brussels and the Netherlands. In 1775, in London, one of the most important centers of clockmaking in the 18th century, Henri-Louis Jaquet-Droz met clock merchants specialized in trade with China including the famous James Cox, who handled the sale of goods through the intermediary of his son in Canton, and the Duvals. Henri-Louis Jaquet-Droz installed and managed a workshop whose output was intended mainly for China.With respect to the period 1781-1810, there is reason to think that two-thirds of the 650 items sold (mentioned in documents) were shipped to China. Catalogues enumerated the characteristics of the watches, snuff boxes, vials and temples, always sold in pairs. They described the material, the mechanism (sometimes) and the decoration (always), indicating whether a particular object featured enamelling, precious stones, singing birds or musical airs. In Geneva, Jean-Frédéric Leschot played a key role from 1784 onward. He perfected, assembled, packed, shipped and ensured the delivery of pieces to London where they were handed over to the merchants that would ship them to Canton.The Writer was the first Jaquet-Droz automaton. Its creator Pierre Jaquet-Droz began work on it in 1768, pursuing his research in the field of picturesque mechanisms and the artificial duplication of life and motion. About 70 cm tall, the automaton took the form of a little boy sitting on a stool, writing with a goose-quill pen on a mahogany table. This mechanism with more than 4’000 components was no doubt the most complex of the three humanoid automata. Programmable, the device was exceptional in that it could write any 40-character text on three lines. With his right hand, The Writer dipped his pen into an inkwell, with his eyes and head following the movement, then shook his pen and wrote his text, one letter at a time, on a piece of paper that shifted in position.Pierre Jaquet-Droz, Henri-Louis Jaquet-Droz and Jean-Frédéric Leschot never made the journey to China. However, their reputation, based on the superior quality of their goods, became well established in that country.On December 8, Montres Jaquet Droz SA was proud to present The Writer, which had made the long journey to Beijing for the first time. Thanks to the support of Montres Jaquet Droz SA and the loan of the masterpiece by Le Musée d’art et d’histoire de Neuchâtel, a new chapter has been added to the story of the clockmakers from La Chaux-de-Fonds, a handsome tribute to three remarkable men. Caroline Junier, Curator of Le Musée d’art et d’histoire de Neuchâtel, and Thierry Amstutz, master watchmaker, also made the trip from Switzerland and helped make this rare event possible. The Whampoa Club, a perfect place for the juxtaposition of tradition and technology, was the venue chosen for a unique demonstration witnessed by fortunate watch connoisseurs and aficionados: before their wondering eyes, The Writer penned the words “Jaquet Droz en Chine” (Jaquet Droz in China). The lucky few were then shown antique pieces that have been carefully preserved by Jaquet Droz, as well as several models from the current collection.The idea of an exhibition germinated from the presence of the historic automata constructed by Pierre and Henri-Louis Jaquet-Droz in the collections of the Musée d’art et d’histoire de Neuchâtel and the latter’s desire to gain more scientific knowledge about these creative geniuses and the world of clockwork automata.The Musée d’art et d’histoire de Neuchâtel, the Musée international d’horlogerie de La Chaux-de-Fonds and the Musée d’horlogerie du Locle-Château des Monts came together to present an exhibition on three outstanding masters of 18th-century clockmaking: Pierre Jaquet-Droz, his son Henri-Louis and their colleague Jean-Frédéric Leschot.To highlight the Jaquet-Droz and Leschot genius, as well as their quest for answers – something that connects them to today’s world – the three museums decided to share their expertise and collections in order to mount an exhibition enriched by many exceptional pieces on loan from private and public collections. Presented simultaneously at all three institutions, this international artistic and technical event will take the visitor from the 18th to the 21st century.www.jaquet-droz.comlast_img read more

Software virtualised on standard platforms promise

first_imgSoftware virtualised on standard platforms promises to revolutionise the cost and agility of broadcast operations, but the transition is not without difficulty. Adrian Pennington reports.In addressing the challenge of online  video, broadcasters are feeling the pull of two forces: IP becoming the dominant video delivery technology and the proliferation of connected devices. The key challenge is how to keep pace with rapid changes in video technology and consumer demand without breaking the bank, over-provisioning resources and taking unnecessary risks.Video infrastructure must support business models that are shifting from high fixed and low variable costing to low fixed and high variable infrastructure expenditures.The obvious answer – if you are a software-only technology provider such as Elemental Technologies – is software.  “Providers rolling out premium video streaming services can immediately respond to changes in consumer demand, strengthen their competitive position, and speed time to market by deploying software-defined video as the core of their next-generation infrastructures,” argues Keith Wymbs, Elemental’s chief marketing officer. “[This] frees providers from the constraints of dedicated equipment by allowing for the best architecture and processor combination to be used for a particular application – even if that application changes over time.”Migration to softwareVideo technology provider Harmonic’s expectation now is that almost everything it does can migrate to software. Its new VOS platform is “a clear statement of our intent to drive to software-defined workflows with IT CPU technology handling all the processing for compression, playout, control, management, and more”, according to Andy Warman, director of product line management, servers and storage. “Value comes from software licence keying that lets you pick what capabilities you want to use, so you pay only for what you need. We can even extend this idea to pay for services only when you need them,” he says.Almost every major vendor of hardware products has unveiled plans to provide software-only variants and we can expect a lot on this topic at IBC. However, software on standard platforms ulimtately enables virtualisation of the technical infrastructure and this is where the significant benefits accrue.“Once we recognise this, the processing, storage and networking infrastructure can then be thought of as provisioned, pooled resources,” says Lawrence Kaplan, a broadcast technology veteran who served at Grass Valley, Sony and Omneon before founding SDVI. “The virtualised infrastructure supports web-based services, which in turn support workflow applications.”The notion of software on virtualised, standard platforms is well-established in other industries, but wholesale migration in broadcast is going to take some time.  “We are still in the early stages of what is both an important but difficult transition,” says Steve Plunkett, chief technology officer, Red Bee Media, now part of Ericsson. “The generalisation of hardware creates a less deterministic environment for the software to operate upon,” he says. “As the hardware and software becomes more abstracted, the demarcation point of responsibility between vendor and user changes. Product designers and developers know exactly what to expect from their hardware stack and optimise accordingly, but in the ‘software-running-on-hardware-of-your-choice’ world, things are less certain.”For example, different CPU implementations will provide different functional and performance characteristics through clock-speed variations, cache sizes/levels, multi-core architectures, internal bandwidth, specialised accelerators – and that’s just the CPU. With storage throughput variations, memory size/bus bandwidth differences, GPUs, LAN throughput, OS and driver versions, the list goes on.“Support becomes more complex also as the vendor needs to accommodate a broader range of deployment scenarios. This is business as usual in the general IT world but something that our industry needs to adapt to quickly,” says Plunkett.The actual shift to commodity or Commercial-Off-the-Shelf (COTS) hardware and software is neither particularly visible nor new. IT organisations within broadcasters have been using software plus COTS hardware for a number of years, and have seen benefits in terms of improved service flexibility, interoperability and reduced costs.“The same holds true of cloud technologies,” suggests Steve Reynolds, chief technology officer, Imagine Communications. “IT organisations had to go through a period of trial and error before placing key applications onto their own private or public clouds, and cloud is now accepted practice globally.”Largely softwareNon-real-time infrastructure that is already largely software includes all file-based receipt, graphics systems, editing, file interchange, and processing up to the edge of a playout TX chain. When it comes to file-based ingest, things like transcoding media, and in the playout domain up and down conversion, aspect ratio conversion and audio remapping, have all been available in software-based solutions for a long time. Function collapse, often referred to as Channel-in-a-Box, or integrated channel playout, is where most software-based activity has been taking place (see below for more on virtualised playout).“The downward pressure on operating expenses for broadcasters is relentless,” says Micky Edwards, vice-president, sales, BroadStream. “Cutting costs can make companies feel like they are taking on undue risk in terms of reliability. However, we can build completely redundant playout systems today cheaper than building a single primary path in the traditional way. As such, companies are not only better protected in the event of a hardware failure, they’re paying less for the solution and for the infrastructure to support it.”Specific video processing functions can be virtualised in public or private data centres or in cloud-based infrastructures. Integrated cloud platforms can ramp resources up and down depending on demand, preventing over-investment in infrastructure.Those areas that remain hardware-centric include components that interface with baseband signals, those that have accelerated performance and those that are commercially tied to a hardware form factor.“As buyers increasingly conclude that software products can increase flexibility, those vendors who cannot demonstrate clear value for their hardware will find it difficult to resist the pressure to release software only variants,” says Red Bee’s Plunkett, who adds that the momentum behind IP/ ethernet replacement of SDI will further reduce the rationale for [icitspot id=”263001″ template=”box-story”]hardware based solutions.A substantial amount of Imagine’s broadcast tech, from traffic and scheduling to automation and asset management, has already shifted to COTS hardware and software. “However hardware-centric video servers may seem, our video server products have moved very quickly to mostly software and COTS,” says Reynolds. “Our compression portfolio is increasingly comprised of software-based technologies utilising hardware acceleration where economics and density requirement dictates – and with regard to video infrastructure, we are creating hybrid platforms that work with both legacy and IP.”Reynolds admits that technology including baseband routers will remain hardware-centric. “The key there is not to presume that legacy transport will disappear,” he says. “In fact, our approach is to enable a seamless on-ramp/off-ramp between IP and baseband transport via our SDN-based media orchestrator, which ensures that tomorrow’s IP-based workflows are managed transparently with today’s. Instead of requiring ‘forklift upgrades’ to the network, our focus is all about giving customers the flexibility to transition at their own pace to the software-centric, all-IP world.”Cloud-washingThe early leader in workflow services running as software on a virtualised, standard platform was transcoding. Cloud-based collaborative editing applications are now catching-on (witness Adobe’s move from licensed software to cloud services) and playout is the next bastion to fall. Ultimately, most production and distribution workflows will be compatible with virtualised infrastructures. “The pace of the shift is largely driven by the ability of the standard processing, storage, or networking platform to meet the technical requirements of the use case; the technical complexity of the use case; and the availability of a new class of software applications and web services that support virtualisation,” says Kaplan.Peter Elvidge, head of global media management at Globecast, suggests that virtualisation is not as established as it should be despite some vendors making “great initial progress” with software-based solutions.Kaplan agrees, noting that “many of the early leaders in this space have been acquired by larger players and that in general the trend has turned back towards hardware – often based on the arguments that it is easier to support. This is a trend that needs to be reversed if our industry is to remain flexible and competitive against other media types,” he says.Nevertheless, the potential to innovate enabled by a truly software defined broadcast environment is exciting the industry. Channels can be deployed rapidly and changed dynamically in real time. “The implications of a virtualised production and distribution infrastructure are nothing less than revolutionary,” says Kaplan.But to take full advantage of this software model the underlying infrastructure also needs to be highly automated and programmable. “Over the next one to three years we can expect to see the technology mature and our ability to harness it increase dramatically,” says Plunkett. “This will alter the economic basis for channel creation and operation significantly.”Ian Hamilton, chief technology officer, Signiant, warns of ‘cloud washing’ where companies brand products with the buzzword ‘cloud’ without fundamentally changing the way they develop and support their software.“The vagueness around the definition of cloud –  which in its most diluted form is a metaphor for ubiquitous network connectivity – facilitates cloud-washing practices,” he says. “Typically, businesses engaged in cloud-washing take software designed for static on-premises deployment, wrap it in a virtual machine, allow businesses to deploy it on public cloud Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) and pay by the hour to operate it. But this is not what software innovators mean when they say ‘cloud’ and there are some very significant services missing from cloud-washed software, especially for businesses.”His prescription is Software as a Service (SaaS) where vendors “take ultimate responsibility for operation of the environment”, giving customers a virtualised infrastructure with continuous access to the latest product releases without impacting customisations. “SaaS automatically scales according to load for you, spinning up or down virtual machines as load dictates and load balancing across multiple instances,” he says.Many current solutions still involve some type of proprietary hardware. “By using pure software product, broadcasters can be much more agile to respond to changing needs, formats and workflows,” says Edwards. “A support team can simply log in remotely to troubleshoot any issues. When you also consider the built-in redundancy of all systems, the economic transformation is significant.”Paula Mathews, head of product for satellite and media at Arqiva, highlights the total cost-of-ownership impact of using standard platforms. These costs are not always immediately obvious, and must be considered before choosing to purchase this type of broadcast technology. For example, she says, COTS platforms are continually being developed, meaning they quickly become obsolete. Wholesale replacement can be extremely expensive. In addition, on-going interruption-free operations should be a key factor in purchase decisions. “With the traditional models of software running on bespoke hardware, the refresh lifecycle was entirely predictable and therefore so was the RoI,” she says. “While software-based broadcast technology running on [COTS] can be attractive in terms of an initial purchase price, this can mean shorter RoI timescales which therefore don’t translate into cost-savings in channel price in the long-term for broadcasters and service providers with large, complex installations.”For service providers like Globecast what really makes the difference is the business model. “The way you buy it, and how locked into a particular solution you become, is increasingly a very important factor in any decision process,” says Elvidge. “As our customers want to grow internationally, and reach more people on a wider variety of devices, we need to offer a range of capabilities and be agile. The more flexible ways to buy technology, that are usually associated with software, are critical for us.”One key area of savings could be limiting the amount of activity that needs to be performed in real time. “Arguably the most interesting concept is related to how much we can avoid doing in real-time, at point of playout, and instead process earlier, in non-real-time in the file domain,” says Elvidge. Areas where cost savings could be made include the insertion of complex three dimensional graphics.Virtual environmentThe day when playout automation can be run on virtual machines in a data centre or in a public cloud over IP networks is drawing closer. “It is increasingly viable to build these environments, with sophisticated functionality, in development settings, and the promise of leveraging the huge investments being made by facilities and cloud providers is very compelling indeed,” says Plunkett. “Any major vendor can probably show a sneak preview of their virtualised product implementation and every broadcaster or service provider should be investing serious time and effort into evaluation and experimentation in this area.”Demands on the control system will inevitably increase as more playout is hosted in the cloud. “Automation solutions, which incorporate the ability to drive all channel variants including those with live content and late breaking events, or that optimise the number of channels a single operator can manage, are poised to offer the most complete solution,” says Tom Gittins, sales director, Pebble Beach Systems. “Control systems that accommodate the need for broadcasters to work across SDI and IP/virtual machine environments provide operational benefits during this transition by isolating the operational staff from the underlying system architecture.”Media validation will be key in virtual environments, as the operator needs to know that the output of each channel is secure, regardless of its geographical location.“While broadcasters can now quickly and cost-effectively launch multiple IP channels, there is an inevitable growth in the volume of information which requires monitoring and processing,” says Gittins. “The challenge becomes how to manage multiple channels efficiently without a corresponding increase in the number of operators.”While there aren’t many obstacles to virtualising playout in technology terms, “the real challenge comes in getting vendors to accept and support these architectures”, Globecast’s Elvidge says. “We’ve already seen a major vendor we use that was once promoting a software solution, where you buy your own server, reverting to selling an integrated appliance.”Imagine is enthusiastic about playout in the cloud, believing that it promises to lower the cost of channel creation at a time when established players need to react quickly to OTT.  Reynolds describes a playout-in-the-cloud pay-as-you-go model that not only reduces cost and time but also removes the geographic barriers of legacy technologies, “meaning that channels can be created on the fly, virtually at any location in the world. Have a media asset that you want to distribute and market in a new location anywhere in the world? Then find a distribution partner, such as a transmitter owner, satellite provider, or fixed/cable provider, and distribute your content. These are some of the new capabilities that are fundamentally changing the business.”Others are more cautious. “Although there’s nothing preventing virtual machines from handling playout, most customers we’ve spoken to feel that a data-centre is a bit too far from home for live playout at this time,” says Edwards. Arqiva’s Mathews agrees: “There is still work to be done. Cost models are one such area, as moving content in and out of the cloud can quickly become expensive,” he says. “A need to gain confidence in both the ability and security of these services is also a key area for progression. The rigours of complex playout can be demanding and it is essential broadcasters have the confidence that their tech can cope, as even non-virtualised software systems can struggle.” Bespoke hardware (with SDI or HD-SDI interfaces) still has its place in linear playout, she feels. “While there are some software alternatives, there is still a level of comfort that we get from the physical SDI, especially when working with routing signals, emergency switching or distribution. Granted, [technical standard Audio Video Bridge] could change this, but there is still a way to go here.”Harmonic’s Warman agrees, suggesting that baseband over IP still needs to be fully worked out and standardised so there is a common mechanism for the whole industry.It is nevertheless logical and reasonable to expect that functionality from the Channel-in-a-Box and integrated-channel type solutions for playout will migrate to the data centre, and the performance and feature set will continue to expand. “While this is beginning to happen, virtualised playout is by far and away the exception rather than the rule,” says Warman. “There is however work still ahead in terms of standardisation, control, and management that is needed for sophisticated playout systems to gain mass appeal. As a counterpoint, now may also be the time to reassess what is needed to deliver an effective channel and how processes in that chain need to interact to deliver the right result.”last_img read more

Oil 8509 9239 9574

first_imgOil85.0992.3995.74 Rock & Stock StatsLast Silver Stocks (SIL)24.1224.4524.15 One Month Ago TSX Venture1,300.921,327.811,621.00 Gold Junior Stocks (GDXJ)23.9423.8831.44 TSX (Toronto Stock Exchange)12,196.8012,273.5712,156.22 Copper3.473.733.44center_img Silver32.1633.8734.58 One Year Ago Dear Reader,Well, just as Doug Casey predicted, Obama won the US election. I wouldn’t make too much of Doug’s successful prediction, as he’s the first to say that these two Obama victories are the only presidential elections he’s predicted correctly.More to the point is the joke going around about two guys watching the election results in a bar, when Obama’s victory is announced. One guy groans: “Four more years!” The other guy cries: “Four more beers!”What’s interesting about this to us is that it reflects investor sentiment. The markets reacted strongly to the election, clearly showing that most investors think another Obama term is bad for the economy. It was striking to see gold and the Dow move so sharply in opposite directions.RealityThe reality – according to Doug and the Casey Brain Trust – is that neither likely winner could stop the train wreck ahead for the economy, so the outcome really didn’t matter.Sure, Obama wasted no time in talking about raising taxes on the rich, which surely only added to investors’ certainty that the president will make things worse. But Romney could have pushed the US into a war much faster, and that would need to be paid for – not that drone-happy Obama is a dove himself.Again, the reality is that even if the differences in rhetoric between Obama and Romney were real, they simply don’t matter compared to the world of hurt pending after decades of mismanagement of the US economy and the post-2008 panic. The stampede has taken the US in completely the wrong direction (dousing the debt bonfire with more easy money), as it has in Europe and Asia as well.All I can really add to this is to remind people of Doug’s mantra for this cycle: buy gold for prudence, gold stocks and other “crisis investing” stocks to speculate for profit, and internationalize yourself to diversify your political risk.PerceptionThat said, perception does move investors, and prices are fixed at the margins, especially during a market mania, which, by definition, divorces prices from underlying value.In this context, the post-electoral perception of increased economic risk is obviously bullish for the financial safe haven of gold. This on top of the probable seasonal increase in gold prices this winter is highly bullish for precious metals stocks in the months ahead – miners and explorers alike. And if we see any black swans alighting during this time, fear and greed could both drive the masses into the only investing sector that offers security and profits.That would be powerful indeed, and we’d see a market mania for the record books.But even if no major black swans upset the house of cards our politicians are desperately trying to hold together amidst a hurricane with an unlimited flow of money-glue… well, there’s still the unlimited flow of money-glue and its necessary consequences, which are bullish for all things real, especially precious metals.There’s also the looming US “fiscal cliff” and all the media circus around the political grandstanding we’ll see in the weeks and months ahead. Indeed, it’s already started. Among the things at stake are sunsetting tax cuts, the lapse of which would hit many middle-class families hard, not just “the rich.” The rhetorical slugfest ahead and its impact on investor perceptions promises to keep markets fear-dominated and volatile. And that too is very bullish for precious metals in the near term.Investors already active in the precious-metals sector seem to realize much of this already. Share prices for good companies that have not run out of cash are up, money is becoming available for project financing, and mergers and acquisitions activity has started heating up again.I’m happy to say that our readers who acted on our recommendations to buy during last summer’s Shopping Season are profiting already, and poised to profit more in the months ahead.What To DoGiven these circumstances, the odds dictate the following general strategies:If you’re long, do not let greed get the better of you: take profits when you have them. You can redeploy them into more stocks if you’re extremely bullish and don’t mind losing your gains, should the market turn in an unexpected way. Or take them out of the game – use them to buy some real asset you want or need. Or whatever else suits your fancy. Just don’t get cocky. Yes, we expect things to continue going up for some time, but no one can say what will be with certainty.If you’re not long, it is not too late. There are great deals out there that have still not rebounded much from last summer’s lows, as well as others that have, but which have material, value-adding developments coming soon. Plus, a rising tide lifts all ships –at least the ones without holes in their hulls.In short, if you’re an investor who’s unhappy with the way the US election turned out, just remember what to do when life hands you lemons – make lemonade. We don’t call the shots, but we can sure do our best to profit and provide for our loved ones based on the trends we see developing.No whining.That’s the investor’s equivalent of being a deer caught in headlights. The deer are not actually caught – if they’d just keep going, they’d almost never get hit at all.The cure for post-election blues is action. If you agree with my analysis above, you know what to do. If you don’t agree, that’s fine – take action based on whatever you see the trends to be. Either course has risks and may or may not work out, but sitting in the headlights is the worst thing you can do.Sincerely,Louis JamesSenior Metals Investment StrategistCasey Research Gold Producers (GDX)50.6752.0860.69 Gold1,738.251,774.001,784.00 Gold and Silver HEADLINESShift in Miners’ Priorities: More Attention to Profit Growth (Ernst & Young)The recently released Mergers, Acquisitions and Capital Raising in the Mining and Metals Sector report by Ernst & Young shows that the overall value of deals completed in the first nine months of 2012 fell 43% year-to-year. The fall is attributed to “turbulent and changing environment of cost inflation, slowing economic growth, heightened geopolitical risk and volatile prices.” The report reveals that these hard conditions have led to a shift in mining companies’ priorities from “growth for growth’s sake” to growth in profits, which includes cost control, credit quality, and focus on shareholder returns.The report says this now means that deals will be more focused on acquisitions that “bring more than market share – such as improved productivity, lower average costs, or improved asset utilization.”This actually sounds quite healthy, in our view. It’s about time more companies focused on good management, and did not just assume higher commodity prices would cover sloppy or reckless policies.Chinese Jewelers Go West for Growth (Reuters)Chinese jewelers are shifting their focus to smaller, inland cities, urged by growing consumer demand for gold. Industry insider Leon Zhao, a consulting director from research firm Frost & Sullivan’s China operations, says “third- and fourth-tier cities are going to be the main engine of China’s jeweler market.” His company believes such cities will account for more than 40% of the country’s total jewelry market by 2015, up from 34% in 2010 and 29% in 2006.Some regional jewelers have already noticed that “in the past two to three years retail outlets in tier three and tier four and in central and western parts of the country have performed better than those in coastal cities.”This trend suggests that China’s gold market is far from being saturated. There are numerous smaller cities that have big potential to consume more gold in the near future, as wealth and spending power increases in these less-developed areas.last_img read more

If you have any interest at all in making the kind

first_img If you have any interest at all in making the kind of money most investors only dream about, you simply have to speculate in today’s junior precious metals explorers.  Historically, they reverse with a vengeance after the kind of extreme overbought conditions we’re seeing today… like Conquistador, which rose 1,874% in 1996… Silverado Mines, which shot up 3,988.5% in 1980, or Golden Scepter, which skyrocketed 7,650% in 1983. To show you why the precious metals sector is on the cusp of rewarding bold speculators with similar gains and how to position yourself to maximize this opportunity, Casey Research is hosting Downturn Millionaires.  This must-see web video event features contrarian investing legends Doug Casey and Rick Rule, who have leveraged beaten-down markets to fortunes multiple times for themselves and their clients… John Mauldin, chairman of Mauldin Economics … Bill Bonner, founder of Agora Publishing… and Casey Research Chief Metals and Mining Investment Strategist Louis James, who will reveal what to look for in a junior mining company, as well as one company with millions of proven ounces of gold in the ground that’s selling at a huge discount. Downturn Millionaires premiers at 2 p.m. on April 8 – to reserve your spot, click here now. Natural resource investors have experienced a tough year. The price of gold bullion has fallen from its 2011 highs and the prices of even good junior companies have been slashed to as little as half of their former valuations. All the more reason to start returning broker phone calls according to David Galland, Casey Research managing director, speaking on the Friday eve of the airing of a webinar he is moderating, featuring some of the biggest names in the industry. The webinar, “Downturn Millionaire: How to Make a Fortune in Beaten-Down Markets,” features Casey Research Founder Doug Casey, Sprott Global Resource Investments Founder Rick Rule, International Speculator Editor Louis James, “Endgame” Author John Mauldin and Diary of a Rogue Economist Editor Bill Bonner. In this interview with The Gold Report, Galland shares the motivation behind assembling this all-star cast for a golden wake-up call. The Gold Report: You are moderating a webinar for Casey Research titled “Downturn Millionaire: How to Make a Fortune in Beaten-Down Markets.” This is going to air on Monday, April 8. It’s an interesting title considering the current state of the precious metals market. Gold hasn’t even flirted with $1,900/ounce ($1,900/oz) since 2011 and dropped below $1,600/oz. Silver fell from $43/oz that same year to below $30/oz. Will this conference deliver the painful message that the bull market is over or do you have some good news for listeners? David Galland: We have some good news. The genesis of the webinar is somewhat interesting. Long-term friend Rick Rule, founder and chairman of Sprott Global Resource Investments Ltd., sent an e-mail saying, “Guys, this is a real market capitulation and one of those rare opportunities to make serious money on the rebound.” The proverbial light went off in our collective heads because we, too, have seen this sort of extreme opportunity several times during our careers. And so we scrambled to pull this webinar together in about a week to help make our subscribers and friends aware of the importance of the market capitulation and how to take full advantage. Simply, this is one of those rare moments when absolutely no one wants anything to do with gold stocks, even though gold bullion itself really hasn’t sold off all that much compared to the gold stocks, which are off by as much as 50%. The overarching purpose of the webinar, therefore, is to serve as a gut check and to help people focus on the opportunity. After all, the global demand for minerals is only going to continue to grow, and the role of precious metals is especially important given the complete lack of monetary and fiscal restraint on the part of the U.S. and other large governments. The role of gold and silver is certainly not over, which points to a huge opportunity because the tremendous apathy and capitulation in the gold share market has knocked even the best companies flat on their backs. TGR: The demand argument makes sense, but were the smart people in this group able to come up with the reason why the stocks are doing so poorly compared to the bullion? DG: We discussed the stocks in depth, starting with the macro-picture for precious metals, and then, by extension, why people want to own the stocks. The speakers had some great insights about why we’ve gotten to this point. Then they focused on what they see ahead for the sector and specific ways to profit as the market bounces back. TGR: One of the featured speakers is Doug Casey, chairman of Casey Research. When we interviewed him in January for “The World According to Doug Casey,” he said “speculation is capitalizing on politically caused distortions in the marketplace.” We’ve had years of quantitative easing, but none of the inflation he predicted. Is the government winning? Is that answered in the webinar? DG: I wouldn’t say we’ve had none of the inflation. The government does its very best to cover it up but we all know that prices have gone up considerably on a lot of things. Look at the basics—foodstuffs, energy and so forth. Are governments winning? No, they are just digging themselves and their respective economies a deeper and deeper hole. That said, you could certainly say that at this stage of the battle, people seem to have forgotten that there’s a connection between money printing and inflation. It is baffling because deconstructing the Great German Inflation and other inflations around the world, it was clear to everyone that money printing was the primary culprit. Yet people seem to have once again forgotten that connection. The faculty in this webinar address the questions of where the inflation is heading, why hasn’t it shown up and what can we expect when we see it. The consensus view among the faculty was that we’re looking at inflation rates in the high double digits and maybe worse within the foreseeable future, maybe not tomorrow, but it will come. Governments around the world seem to think that their economies are like washing machines that can be fixed with a bit of tinkering, but they’ll have serious trouble turning off the money printing machines. Social promises have been made, hundreds of millions of people now rely on governments for the bulk of their sustenance. Yet it’s important to remember that governments don’t actually make anything, except maybe wars. Where is the money going to come from for all these social programs? It’s going to be magically whipped up out of thin air essentially. That will have an effect on the purchasing power of the currency units already in circulation, and it will have a positive effect on the prices of tangibles, most importantly gold and silver. TGR: Participant Bill Bonner, who is the editor of The Diary of a Rogue Economist, also watches macrotrends. Does he see any end to the emergency-of-the-week theme playing out on the global stage? And does he have any suggestions for how investors can protect themselves from the fallout? DG: Bill completely understands the role that gold plays in preserving personal net worth, but doesn’t usually discuss gold shares per se. Even so, in our webinar he said something that really got my attention, “The time to buy these shares is when nobody wants to own them, when even you don’t want to own them.” That struck home with me because I’ve been investing in this market since the 1970s, and long ago I learned that the time you really want to back up the truck is when you have exactly the kind of bombed out markets that we have today. As Bill spoke, it really resonated because I, too, have been ducking calls from my broker, and I have a lot of respect for my broker. Worst of all, my broker is calling me offering me financings on great companies that come with five-year warrants, which is a very rare thing and only seen in periods of complete capitulation. But I didn’t want to take the guy’s calls because of the same mistake a lot of people are making at this point, which is just to assume that the market is dead forever when, in fact, that’s very much not the case. TGR: So when David’s scared, that’s the time to buy. Is that what you’re saying? DG: Well, not so much scared. I just didn’t want to hear about the sector anymore. Listening to this webinar inspired me to spend time looking at stocks of companies that I know have great projects, and great management and cash in the bank. Universally, these great companies have sold off by 50-60% or more. Yet, there is nothing wrong with these companies other than this panic out of the risk-on trades in the junior resource sector. That was a real wake up call. TGR: Webinar speaker John Mauldin, author of Thoughts from the Frontline, predicted, in a November interview with us, “John Mauldin’s Roadmap to Surviving the Fiscal Cliff,” that politicians would find a way around the fiscal cliff that was looming at that time, but he warned that the economy would be in for a bumpy ride. In this webinar, did he have any predictions for when or how things would get better? DG: John jokes that even as a relative pessimist, he looks like an optimist when in the company of the Casey Research team. John still thinks there is the possibility of a political solution to the economic crisis. If there is, I haven’t seen it, and nothing on the horizon looks like it’s going to happen as far as I can see. Despite his cautious optimism, John was absolutely in sync with the rest of the speakers’ opinions about the great contrarian opportunity in gold and the gold share market, an opportunity that most people will miss, but shouldn’t. TGR: Another speaker, International Speculator Editor Louis James, stressed the importance of thinking long term when we interviewed him last September for the article “How Investors Can Protect Themselves in a Politicized Economy.” He said the junior market was looking “bottomish” and it looked like a good time to buy. Will he be mentioning what companies he likes in the webinar? DG: He talks about a couple of companies he likes as examples. He’s also quite adamant about the criteria that people should use in deciding what precious metals shares belong in their portfolio and what shares people should be selling now. The reality is that a good number of these companies will not survive this downturn. If you’re sitting on a company with no cash in the bank, an only so-so project and average management, there’s a reasonable chance it’s going to go to $0 even though it may have already gone down by 50%. In the webinar, Louis covers the specific aspects of companies you want to own in your portfolio and the ones you should lose. It’s an important message because these things are, as Doug Casey likes to say, not family heirlooms but burning matches. And the ones that aren’t going to make it just aren’t going to make it. You have to come to that reality. But the good news is that by rotating into the certain winners you can claw back pretty quickly when the market sentiment shifts, as it most certainly will. TGR: Another one of the webinar speakers, Rick Rule, is a very popular expert with The Gold Reportreaders. When he spoke to our president, Karen Roche, last November for an article titled “Be a Risk Manager, Not a Reward Chaser,” he called gold “catastrophe insurance.” Does he have any specific advice for how investors should adjust their portfolios in a downturn? DG: I would say similar to Louis, his message is very clear. There are definitely companies that aren’t going to make it, and then there are companies that are going to make it and make it in a very big way. It was interesting because I’ve known Rick for a couple of decades now and I have seen him give a lot of presentations, but he was very vocal in pointing to an urgency in this market that most people are missing. Rick, Louis, Doug and all of the people on this webinar are really on the same page about this. Investors need a wakeup call. They need to really be paying attention at this moment because it’s one of those rare, once-in-a-generation opportunities to, as John Mauldin says, get in front of a bubble. We’ve seen this before. We saw this in July 1982, another classic capitulation with gold falling from over $800/oz in 1980 to below $350/oz. As you might imagine, the gold shares were completely sold off with the volume on the Canadian stock exchanges falling to next to nothing. But then there were a couple of discoveries in the Hemlo district of Canada, coinciding with a rally in gold, and the market skyrocketed. One of the companies involved in a Hemlo discovery, Golden Sceptre, went from a low of $0.41/share up to $31/share in about a year. Another, Goliath Gold, went from $0.45/share in March 1982 to $32/share in March 1983, an increase of over 7,000%. That sort of opportunity is pretty much only available following periods of market capitulation such as we are experiencing today. People have forsaken reason, and they don’t want to know about gold stocks. That alone should point the way to a classic contrarian opportunity where pretty much everybody who is going to sell has sold, leaving only one way to move—up—for the companies with the right combination of attributes to survive. TGR: So as painful as this has been for all of us over the last couple of years, after listening to these speakers, are you ready to say you welcome a down market for the opportunity it affords? DG: Absolutely. And as I said, it was a complete wakeup call for me. Until participating in the webinar, I had completely stopped paying attention to the sector. Now I am completely re-engaged and talking to my broker again. TGR: Thank you for taking the time to talk to us. DG: It was nice to be with you.last_img read more

New law cracks down on right to use cash

first_img New law cracks down on right to use cash The U.S. government is trying to restrict your access to cash. But not for the reason you think… According to leaked evidence it’s much, much worse. Insuring themselves against “black swan” events, but not investing with the hope of profiting from them, Fixed Income – Historically, bonds make up this asset class. At one time, bonds (AAA municipal bonds) represented as much as 40% of my net investible worth. My strategy was always to hold until maturity and buy them in “ladders,” replacing them when they matured. But I haven’t bought them since the rates dropped below 4.5% and have sold some I didn’t like much. Today, they represent about 5% of my net investible wealth. I also own an annuity and a life insurance product. These are not the typical insurance products. Most annuities and life insurance products are very expensive and very complicated. You have to be very careful with those. Editor’s Note: Last Tuesday, Mark appeared on a special live webinar to discuss his experience with using options (to date, he’s generated over $282,000 in instant cash payouts over the last three years). To watch the replay of this event—and learn in detail how this technique works—click here. Rental Real Estate – Next to business ventures, income-producing property investments have been the largest contributor to my wealth-building success. I invest for the income and see appreciation as a bonus. As with insurance products, real estate investing can be tricky for the inexperienced investor. Most mainstream real estate advice is bad. But if you do it properly—focusing on income—this asset class will do huge work for your portfolio. Editor’s Note: Can you get rich investing in stocks and bonds? Palm Beach Research Group founder Mark Ford has more insight into this question than most. Although he’s not an investment analyst, he’s worked in the financial publishing industry for over 30 years. He’s also built dozens of businesses from scratch…creating millions of dollars of wealth in the process. In short, Mark knows more about building wealth than just about anyone. In today’s Weekend Edition, Mark explains nine steps he is personally taking right now to grow and keep his money. By Mark Morgan Ford I am not an investment professional. I have never made any money managing other people’s money. I went from rags to riches the old-fashioned way: working hard and then investing my income as carefully as I could. Because I’d done well on my own, I never considered seeking financial advice. Then a funny thing happened. I woke up one day with the thought that I should have a “professional” manage some of my money. I interviewed two firms. One was a boutique business based in New York City that a friend recommended. The other was a private banking facility for one of the world’s largest brokerages. The boutique firm was happy to take $100,000 of my money to get started. The other company wanted a minimum of $10 million. They both had fancy offices and pretty marketing brochures. But such frills scare me. They make me think, “Gee, these guys must be charging their customers a lot to afford all this stuff.” My trepidations notwithstanding, I worked with both of them for about six months. I answered their questions about my tolerance for risk (little to none). I listened to their presentations. And then I did something that I bet few of their clients ever do. I started asking them questions. And I kept pushing them to explain why I should believe that they could help me become wealthier. What I got instead was clever circumlocution. A financially sophisticated version of what you’d expect from your teenage son if you pestered him about why he didn’t come home until four in the morning. Those discussions convinced me that these guys could not manage my money better than I had been managing it. To be fair, they certainly knew more about investment products than I did. But they didn’t know more about how to become wealthy. These guys were smart. They had graduate degrees from great schools. They spoke eloquently. They seemed so…so…inside the game. I wanted them to be better than me. I really did. But they really didn’t seem to care whether their services would make me richer or poorer. The contracts they wanted me to sign were going to put money in their pockets regardless. That didn’t feel right. In the end, I told both of my elite financial planners to take a hike. And I went back to managing my money myself. Seeing Only 20% of the Big Picture The investment advisory industry is a huge multibillion-dollar business based on hard work, clever thinking, and sophisticated algorithms. But also on one teensy-weensy lie. The lie is that you can grow wealthy investing in stocks and bonds. It’s not a big, black lie. But the unfortunate truth is the financial establishment rarely looks beyond stocks and bonds. And if you think about it, why would it want to? It makes its money by ushering you from one “hot” stock or “amazing” fund to the next. Wall Street wants you to think the stock (and sometimes the bond) markets are the only places you can make money. And because they know that you have heard that “diversification of assets” is good, they give you the illusion of diversification by having your stock portfolio invested in businesses that are “diversified” into manufacturing, retail, global trade, natural resources, etc. This is, as I said, an illusion. At the end of the day, it’s all invested in stocks or stock derivatives. The result? More risk and less potential wealth gain for you. So start by deconstructing the little lie. Building wealth involves much more than just investing in stocks and bonds. Most rich people get that way by consistently doing the following nine things: Giving top priority to increasing their net investible income, not maximizing returns, Options – Although my cardinal rule is not to invest in something I don’t understand, my colleague, Tom Dyson, found a way to trade options that I both understand and also believe in. Like real estate and insurance products, most options strategies are speculations. I’d advise against them. But the way Tom taught me to do it, selling puts on legacy-type stocks, has worked very well for me. In fact, over eight years of testing, it’s proven successful 96.2% of the time. If you’re interested in a free, three-part training series he’s currently running on this type of options trading, I recommend clicking here. Spending less as a percentage of net income as it grows so they can save more, Investing in safe real estate—i.e., income-producing properties, Recommended Links Jim Rickards Issues “Critical Warning #3″… Jim Rickards just issued a new critical market update. You need to check this out… Jim’s issued this kind of update only twice before in recent history… Both times were about massive changes in the markets. And this change is even BIGGER… See this very short video by clicking here. Investing in stocks and bonds with discipline—i.e., without expecting to get returns that are much higher than market averages, And keeping a substantial store of cash to be used when “cash becomes king.” As you can see, investing in stocks and bonds is only one of nine strategies you must follow to become rich, but that was the only one that the two money management firms I tried cared about. Direct Investments in Entrepreneurial Businesses – This is, by far, the investment class that has given me the best results. If you do this right, you can expect terrific, steady income and the potential for enormous growth. The trick here is to invest only in companies you understand and have some control over. Owning tangible, portable, and non-reportable assets as a reserve that can be tapped into at opportune moments, Cash – I call this a “Cash Opportunity Fund.” You keep a store of money you add to every year. That way, when the crash comes, you can use this fund to swoop in and buy a bunch of great assets at bargain prices. Understanding debt and using it occasionally and strategically to build wealth, — Chaos Hedges – This asset class is not, for me, an investment. It is, as the name implies, protection from times of turbulence—a market crash, bankruptcy, lawsuits, etc. In this class I include gold, silver, and platinum coins (bullion and one or two “rare” types). I bought all I needed when gold was trading at about $400 an ounce. It’s gone up and down since then but at today’s prices it looks good again. Collectibles – This is a category of investing that you will probably not be interested in, unless you want to enrich not just your net worth but your experience of living each and every day for the rest of your life. My preferred collectible is fine art and first-edition books, but you can invest in anything from baseball cards to vintage cars to surfboards. How to Ensure Financial Growth and Security So if you can’t reasonably expect to get rich with just stocks and bonds, what can you do? You can model your investing behavior on the behaviors that have been proven, time and time again, to actually work. I’m talking about asset allocation. Asset allocation is the process by which you spread your wealth across different sorts of investments. You might think that something so dull as asset allocation could not possibly be that important in acquiring wealth, but numerous studies have shown that it may be the most important factor. (These studies can be found here.) Because of an early financial disaster, I became an emotionally compulsive diversifier of practically every dollar I could save, putting some of it in bonds, some in stocks, some in cash, some in real estate, and so on. Over the years I have made hundreds of individual financial decisions—buy this, sell that. Some of them were quite good, a few of them were quite bad, and most of them were in-between. And yet, overall, my net worth had increased considerably and consistently, without any down years, for more than 30 years. I could see very clearly that this was not due to the particular buy/sell decisions that accounted for this good fortune. It was the general decisions about asset allocation that paid off. Since I discovered this, I have been telling my readers about my own asset allocation decisions every year. Not because I think my portfolio is the best possible exemplum of diversification, but just to illustrate my belief that one needs to go well beyond some combination of stocks, bonds, and cash to win at the wealth-building game. My yearly report is reasonably detailed, but the following will give you a bird’s eye view of what I do. Stocks – I have several stock portfolios: one that you might call “legacy” stocks, one that I call “performance stocks,” and a third group that includes what would conventionally be called “growth” and “speculative” stocks. The lion’s share (maybe 80% to 90%) of my stock money is in the legacy stocks: a handful of big, dividend-giving companies that I’m happy to keep on a “forever” basis. A smaller percentage is in dividend-giving companies with growth potential. And a tiny percentage are speculations—stocks I’m quite sure I’ll lose all my money on but I want to own them just for fun. – Investing directly in private enterprises and other “outside Wall Street” opportunities,last_img read more

From sports drinks to protein powders from compre

first_imgFrom sports drinks to protein powders, from compression therapy to cupping — there’s a whole industry of products and services designed to help us adapt to and recover from exercise.But does any of it work? That’s the question science writer Christie Aschwanden set out to answer in her new book, Good to Go: What the Athlete in All of Us Can Learn from the Strange Science of Recovery.A former high school and college athlete, Aschwanden is the lead science writer for the website fivethirtyeight and was previously a health columnist for The Washington Post.She notes that recovery wasn’t given much consideration back when she was coming up. Now, however, times have changed and recovery is “something that you do — and almost with as much gusto as the workouts themselves,” she says.Aschwanden’s book examines the physiology behind different recovery methods and also offers an assessment of their effectiveness. Ultimately, she notes, the best form of recovery may be an old-fashioned one: listening to your own body.”The most important skill that any athlete can develop is a sense of how their body is responding to exercise,” she says. “How they’re responding to their workouts; how they’re feeling; what it feels like for them to be recovered or underrecovered.”Interview HighlightsOn sports drinks that have electrolytes”Electrolytes” is just a scientific name for salts. These are things that we get in all of the food that we eat. … And so, the idea is that when you’re exercising, you’re sort of creating these extraordinary needs, and … so you need to replace these salts that you’re sweating out. When you sweat, you do lose some salts. You lose fluids. So the idea behind sports drinks is that they’re replacing those. …There are products now that will promise to find your individual sweat rate and individual salt-loss rate, but it turns out you don’t need a scientist looking over your shoulder to figure out how much you need to drink, or how much salt you need after exercise. Our bodies have this really sophisticated mechanism for helping us determine this — and it’s called thirst.On the danger of overhydratingWe’ve been given this message for so long — and so much of it is marketing — this idea that … you have to always be drinking and hydrate, hydrate, hydrate. But it turns out that this just isn’t true. This idea and this concept that we have to be drinking even when we’re not thirsty has led to this problem that can actually be deadly. It’s called hyponatremia. It’s also called water intoxication, but this is something where people drink too much water and they end up diluting their blood to the point where they have all sorts of issues, including your brain can swell. And it can actually be fatal. …I don’t want to make anyone feel like, “Oh, my gosh, I just drank a glass of water, was I really thirsty? Like, am I going to get hyponatremia and die?” That’s not what we’re talking about. And we’re talking about people who are drinking on the order of, like, multiple glasses of water per hour — in particular, while exercising. But really, if you’re not thirsty you don’t need to drink. It really is that simple.There have been multiple people now who have died in marathons from drinking too much. And one of the things that makes this really scary is that some of the symptoms of overhydration look very similar to the things that we think of as being symptoms of dehydration. So for instance, dizziness, confusion, fatigue things like this. And so, in some cases, what’s happened is you have someone who collapses at a race and they’re given an IV and given more fluids, which is exactly the wrong thing at that point for them.On the genesis of Power Bars and what to eat after a workoutReally the idea in the beginning was to create a food that would be convenient for athletes — something to eat after a workout that was easy to grab, easy on the stomach and all of that. But in the intervening years, there’s been sort of this push to think that this is absolutely the necessary thing that you must eat, and that there must be some important component or some important nutrient … that you really need. …There’s nothing inherently wrong with these products — I’ll just say that upfront. They tend to have pretty good nutrients and ingredients for what you need after a workout. But there’s nothing particularly special about them either, except that they’re convenient. … You can have an energy bar or you could have a banana, or you could have a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — which apparently is the food of choice in the NBA. … But the idea that you have to have something that’s a packaged product just doesn’t hold water.On icing after workouts to reduce sorenessThe idea behind icing is that it’s a way to reduce inflammation. When you ice something, you are reducing the blood flow to that area. So basically, if your extremity gets cold, your body sort of shunts the blood into the core to try and keep you warm. During this time, when the blood flow is less to that area, you’re getting less circulation of these inflammatory things that are part of the inflammatory process. The idea here is that you’re going to reduce inflammation and that was, for a long time, really considered a good thing. …Now the thinking [in terms of icing to reduce soreness] is really changing. … We’ve learned that inflammation is actually a really important part of the training response. If you are doing exercise in hopes of getting fitter, faster, stronger, you really need inflammation. You need that inflammatory process. You need your immune system bringing in these inflammatory things that are coming in to make those repairs. So the inflammation process is actually the repair process. Without it, you’re not going to get the same adaptations to exercise that you would otherwise.On the problem with taking ibuprofen before and after a workoutIt’s really common that athletes will take it prophylactically. So they’ll take it before a workout or before a race even. One scenario where it’s really popular is among ultramarathoners. So these are people that are running, say, 50 or 100 or even more miles, and they will take these drugs during the event or before.I remember back in my high school track days, one of my teammates was popping ibuprofen before practice every day. And I know now after researching this book that that’s a pretty bad idea. And there are a couple of reasons for that. The first is that again, [in terms of exercise], inflammation is your friend. If you’re working out, that is how your body repairs itself. So there’s actually some pretty intriguing evidence that taking ibuprofen can impair the repair process from an injury. And that refers both to the type of microinjury that you get from a hard workout — the little damage to your muscle that your body comes in and repairs, and that’s what makes you stronger. But also to injuries like, say, a sprained ankle and things like this. So taking a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug or taking ibuprofen can actually impede the healing process. I don’t think anyone wants to do that.At the same time, I will say, though, if you’re in a lot of pain these are really good painkillers. And that’s probably a good reason to take it. But you want to limit it, and … you only want to take it when you really, really need that pain relief — and not [with] an expectation that you’re going to feel pain.Sam Briger and Mooj Zadie produced and edited the audio of this interview. Bridget Bentz and Molly Seavy-Nesper adapted it for the Web. Copyright 2019 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.last_img read more

In what would likely become the most restrictive a

first_imgIn what would likely become the most restrictive abortion ban in the country, the Alabama House Tuesday passed a bill that would make it a crime for doctors to perform abortions at any stage of a pregnancy, unless a woman’s life is threatened. The legislation is part of a broader anti-abortion strategy to prompt the U.S. Supreme Court to reconsider the right to abortion. Republican state Rep. Terri Collins of Decatur, Ala. defended her “Human Life Protection Act” during, at times, contentious debate on the House floor. “This bill is focused on that baby that’s in the womb that is a person,” Collins said. “That baby, I believe, would choose life.” Democratic lawmakers walked out in protest before the final 74 to 3 vote. During debate, they questioned the motive for an abortion ban in a state that’s refused to expand Medicaid. “I do support life, but there are some people that just support birth they don’t support life,” said Democratic Rep. Merika Coleman of Birmingham, Ala. “Because after a child is born there are some things that need to happen. We need to make sure that child has adequate health care,” Coleman said.Other states, including neighboring Georgia and Mississippi, have passed laws that prohibit abortion once a fetal heartbeat can be detected. But Alabama’s ban would apply even earlier.”When a woman is pregnant, an abortion is no longer legal,” says Collins, explaining the bill. The bill criminalizes abortion, meaning doctors would face felony jail time up to 99 years if convicted. The only exceptions are for a serious health risk to the pregnant woman, or a lethal anomaly of the fetus. There are no exceptions for cases of rape or incest. A woman would not be held criminally liable for having an abortion.Collins says the bill follows a constitutional amendment approved by Alabama voters last year that recognizes the “rights of unborn children.” It defies the U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark decision that protects a woman’s right to abortion.”This bill is simply about Roe v. Wade,” says Collins. “The decision that was made back in 1973 would not be the same decision that was decided upon today if you relooked at the issue.” Her bill cites abolition, the civil rights movement and women’s suffrage as justification for establishing the human rights of a fetus. Alabama is one of more than two dozen states seeking to restrict abortion rights this year, testing federal legal precedent that prevents states from banning abortion before the point at which a fetus could survive outside the womb. Alabama Pro-Life Coalition President Eric Johnston says there’s a reason there’s so much activity now.”The dynamic has changed,” Johnston says. “The judges have changed, a lot of changes over that time, and so I think we’re at the point where we need to take a bigger and a bolder step.” The bold move to outlaw nearly all abortions is drawing protests from abortion rights advocates. A coalition called Unite for Reproductive and Gender Equity demonstrated outside the Alabama statehouse last month. “This bill is an awful piece of grandstanding,” said Amanda Reyes of Tuscaloosa, Ala. She’s president of the Yellowhammer Fund, a group that helps women pay for abortions. “If you make abortion illegal somewhere that doesn’t mean that abortion goes away,” says Reyes. “It just becomes more difficult and more dangerous to access.” The bill is expected to win final passage in the Republican majority Alabama Senate. The ACLU of Alabama says it will sue if the abortion ban becomes law. Executive Director Randall Marshall says the bill is unconstitutional. “There is simply nothing that Alabama can do to interfere with the right of access to abortion,” Marshall says. “That is a federal right and the Federal Constitution clearly trumps all state law.” With two Trump appointees now on the U.S. Supreme Court, anti-abortion forces are optimistic that judicial interpretation could be reversed. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

A disabled writeractivist is hoping that his new

first_imgA disabled writer-activist is hoping that his new novel will alert its readers to the “scary” undercurrent of disablism that has been repeatedly stirred up by the government’s “benefit scrounger” rhetoric.The Norwich Wheelchair Murders is Bill Albert’s eighth novel, and its combination of hard-bitten cynicism, sharp dialogue, ruthless gangsters and fast-moving plot has led to it being dubbed the first of a new genre: Crip Noir.It follows the journey taken by Bobby “The Fixer” Fishbaum, who sees “handicapped people” as “big time losers. Disgusting. Unpredictable. Embarrassing. Helpless.”Fishbaum has to flee his penthouse in Santa Monica to escape some vengeful Russian gangsters, and ends up hiding out with his five-year-old daughter in a council flat in Norwich, while also coming to terms with a diagnosis that has left him using a wheelchair.It is a similar journey to the one Albert took himself. Born in New York, the former university academic grew up and studied in California, but has lived in England since 1964, and in Norwich for more than 45 years.He did not discover that he was a disabled person until he finally received a medical diagnosis at the age of 31, but his journey to feeling comfortable with that identity was a gradual one that took at least another 10 years.That journey was aided by meeting other “crips” at a Norwich access group, people whose demonstration of “lives well lived” taught him, he said, about himself and “how to be”.Before he met them, like his character Bobby Fishbaum, he says in a short memoir, he “didn’t know any disabled people. I didn’t want to either. They frightened me, repelled me with their crippled twitching, garbled speech, their unnatural ways.”Taking part in the last of the anti-Telethon demos outside the studios of London Weekend Television in 1992 – where his teachers were “five hundred joyfully angry crips, rolling and staggering and stumbling and drooling and twitching and shouting and singing and waving banners” – was a swift introduction to the disabled people’s movement, the social model and direct action.Soon he was importing some of that back to Norwich, and helping to set up Norfolk Coalition of Disabled People – these days known as Equal Lives – for which he was the founding chair.One of the disabled “role models” who taught him “how to be” was an activist called Brendan Carroll, on whom he loosely based the character of Brendan in his novel.The novel’s dedication says it was Carroll, who died several years ago, and six other disabled friends who taught him “the joys of being a bolshy crip”.Albert says: “I miss him every day. He was a very unlikely, charismatic figure. He really lived a life. I have made him into my crip superhero.”His novel’s other disabled characters are “amalgams” of other disabled people he knows, albeit “a bit more extreme” than they are in real life.The Norwich Wheelchair Murders was, he says, an attempt “to explain disability to the world which was different to how anybody else had done it”.One of its central themes is the extent to which disabled people are subjected to hate crime, something Albert started to become aware of while editing the monthly newsletter for the international disability rights charity Disability Awareness in Action, and from hearing about the experiences of other disabled people in Norwich, particularly those with learning difficulties.As other disabled activists and artists – most notably Liz Crow – have done in recent years, he draws a parallel between the attitudes to disabled people in Nazi Germany that found its most brutal expression in the Aktion T4 programme, which saw the targeted killing of as many as 200,000 disabled people, and similar attitudes that have surfaced in recent years in the UK.As one character in his novel says: “He said most disabled people were little more than a burden on themselves and the rest of us too. Scroungers, he called them, useless scroungers. Already half dead anyway.”It was an attitude Albert noticed as a member of the Human Genetics Commission – between 1999 and 2005 – when he came across views that can only be described as “eugenics” but which had been “crafted in a medical way”, and suggested that “disabled people were not something you would want to choose”.He said: “It’s gone much further now. It’s really scary stuff. That’s always in the back of my mind, because I was right there when it was all being trotted out and debated.”Albert insists that the hateful attitudes espoused by some of the characters in his novel are not that different to the rhetoric spouted by some politicians.He said: “Look at the all the stuff that’s coming out from the government.“They are kind of painting us as very much like that, but not in that kind of stark language, but if you read the sub-titles that’s what you think.”It is reflected, he says, in the everyday experiences of disabled people. “People I know have had nasty comments made to them about being a scrounger.”He adds: “Look what the government has done in the last five years. All the stuff we have fought for, I have been fighting for for 25 years – lots of other people for even longer – has been rolled back. We are going backwards at the moment.”He is still treasurer of Equal Lives, and has been active in the fight against public sector cuts that is a major feature of the organisation’s work – he says many disabled people in Norfolk are being “devastated” by the cuts – although these days in more of a backroom support role.Indeed, just hours before Disability News Service’s interview with Albert, disabled activists and others staged a demonstration outside the headquarters of Norfolk County Council, in protest at further planned cuts to public services.The Norwich Wheelchair Murders does not address government cuts and rhetoric head-on, and instead tries a more subtle approach, hinting at the backdrop of cuts that exists behind the lives of its disabled characters.But Albert says he “absolutely” wants the book to deliver a wake-up call on disability hate crime.“Those attitudes are out there,” he says. “This government has done nothing but stoke them, basically, while saying, ‘We are not against disabled people, we want to help them, they are the most needy,’ which doesn’t mean anything.”last_img read more

A note from the editor Please consider making a v

first_imgA note from the editor:Please consider making a voluntary financial contribution to support the work of DNS and allow it to continue producing independent, carefully-researched news stories that focus on the lives and rights of disabled people and their user-led organisations. Please do not contribute if you cannot afford to do so, and please note that DNS is not a charity. It is run and owned by disabled journalist John Pring and has been from its launch in April 2009. Thank you for anything you can do to support the work of DNS… Disabled activists and their allies have forced a council into a significant climbdown over its “discriminatory” plans for a memorial to victims of the Peterloo massacre.Manchester City Council (MCC) said this week that it had asked artist Jeremy Deller to examine how the memorial he designed can now be made “fully accessible”.The council-funded memorial was set to be completely inaccessible to many disabled people (pictured), even though Deller wanted it to be used as a platform for speakers and demonstrators, mirroring those who spoke during the protest in 1819 that led to the massacre*.The council had previously told Disability News Service (DNS) that it was unlikely that any “fundamental changes” would be made to the memorial, which is due to be unveiled to the public on 16 August, the 200th anniversary of the massacre.But there has now been an apparent climbdown following weeks of protests led by disabled activists.The council’s announcement follows a meeting between city councillors Luthfur Rahman (executive member for skills, culture and leisure) and Tracey Rawlins (lead member for disabled people), and representatives of disabled people’s groups.Mark Todd, a disabled access expert who started a Facebook page to protest at the design of the memorial – and has called it “a monument to discrimination” – said he was “really pleased” at the council’s apparent change of approach.He said that the “breadth and determination” of the campaign and the willingness to work with the council appeared to have paid off.And he said the campaign had built an “amazing coalition” that included disabled people, artists, celebrities, and citizens of Manchester “who all want a Peterloo Memorial that is accessible to everyone”.Among those who have supported the campaign are the musician and activist Billy Bragg, who said: “Surely something that symbolises the struggle for universal rights should be accessible to all.”Disabled comedian and activist Francesca Martinez said it was “extraordinary” that the memorial design had not been inclusive, while there has also been criticism from disabled actor-campaigners Cherylee Houston and Ali Briggs.Briggs said: “We all want a memorial, yes that’s true. We just don’t want one like this, that we can’t be proud of.”Todd said this week that he was “cautiously optimistic” following the council’s statement, but until there was a “fitting and accessible Peterloo Memorial”, the campaign and a weekly vigil near the site would continue.He said: “We are not ready to put away our placards just yet.”Greater Manchester Coalition of Disabled People (GMCDP), which has played a key role in the protests, also welcomed the announcement.But it warned that the council had not yet met its three demands – to stop work on the memorial while it was still low enough to include a ramp; to ensure the memorial was accessible; and to make sure there was no repeat of the council’s failure with future projects – and pointed out that building work on the inaccessible memorial was now nearly finished.Campaigners will meet next week with the council, Deller and the architect working on the project, and will then decide whether to review their demands.A GMCDP spokesperson said: “MCC’s decision to build the memorial to its full height and then explore access solutions afterwards, limits considerably what can be done to make it a platform everyone can use.“We do not know what MCC have in mind, if anything, and we acknowledge that a perfect solution may not be arrived at immediately. “What is needed most at this stage is the commitment to find a genuine accessible long-term solution, properly considered, fully consulted on and backed up with some teeth and a budget.”The council has faced weeks of anger from disabled people and allies that a memorial designed to remember those who marched for liberty and equality in the 19th century should apparently have been “designed and built with discrimination and inequality at its heart”.Now the council has said that it regrets that the design of the memorial “did not give enough consideration to access issues”.Cllr Rahman said: “Manchester City Council has a long and proud record around access issues, something which disabled access campaigners have acknowledged. “However, we recognise that the interpretation of the brief for the Peterloo Memorial, with an imaginative design involving a more interactive element than originally envisaged for a public artwork, did not give enough consideration to access issues and we regret this.“We recently met with representatives of disabled people’s groups to further discuss this issue and we have asked the artist and architect to look at how the monument in its current form can be modified to make it fully accessible.“We will share more details about where we are up to and the proposed way forward as soon as we are in a position to do so.“We are listening and doing all we can to resolve this satisfactorily.”Deller told DNS last night (Wednesday) that he was optimistic that a solution could be found to make the memorial accessible.*On 16 August 1819, paramilitary and military forces attacked more than 60,000 peaceful, pro-democracy and anti-poverty protesters in Manchester, which led to 18 deaths and an estimated 700 serious injuries, in what became known as the Peterloo Massacrelast_img read more

InFlight WiFi

first_img This story appears in the November 2005 issue of Entrepreneur. Subscribe » In-Flight Wi-Fi Add to Queue Learn how to successfully navigate family business dynamics and build businesses that excel. –shares Free Webinar | July 31: Secrets to Running a Successful Family Business Mile-high productivity gets a boost from in-air Wi-Fi. Next Article Amanda C. Kooser Magazine Contributor Register Now » While we still can’t use our cell phones on airplanes, onboard internet is getting a lot of attention.In-air Wi-Fi is pretty much ready for prime time. It doesn’t have the interference or social issues that crop up around cell phone usage. International travelers will get the first crack at it. There have been Wi-Fi announcements and implementations from airlines like Singapore Airlines and German carrier Lufthansa. Connexion by Boeing is a leading provider in this area. Pricing can start as low as $8 for a 30-minute block. Check for availability on your next overseas flight.Look for in-flight Wi-Fi on U.S. airlines sometime next year. Boingo customers will benefit from a roaming agreement that allows access on Connexion-enabled flights. United Airlines and Verizon Airfone have tested their own in-flight Wi-Fi, due to go online next year as well. 1 min read Technology November 1, 2005last_img read more

KFC Has a New Nail Polish That Tastes Like Chicken Start Up

first_imgStart Up Your Day Fireside Chat | July 25: Three Surprising Ways to Build Your Brand Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. Learn from renowned serial entrepreneur David Meltzer how to find your frequency in order to stand out from your competitors and build a brand that is authentic, lasting and impactful. 1 min read Enroll Now for $5 Lindsay Friedman Staff writer. Frequently covers franchise news and food trends. KFC Has a New Nail Polish That Tastes Like Chicken — Start Up Your Day Roundup Add to Queue Image credit: Settawat Udom | Shutterstock Looking for the latest headlines in small business, innovation and tech? Our Start Up Your Day recaps are posted every morning to keep you current.Planned. Tesla plans 500,000 cars for 2018. Inclusivity. Uber will bring its new accessible ride services to Chicago starting this month, according to The Chicago Tribune.Under the knife. This robot surgeon sewed up a pig’s insides.Don’t mess with mama. In honor of Mother’s Day this weekend, Facebook Messenger will adorn your chats with flowers.A new day. Burger King will launch a new breakfast sandwich, the Egg-Normous Burrito.  Finger-licking good. KFC seems to have taken its slogan seriously after releasing its own nail polish. It’s supposed to taste like chicken. May 5, 2016 –shares Next Article last_img read more

Study Biasbased bullying does more harm to students than generalized bullying

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Nov 15 2018A new study finds that bias-based bullying does more harm to students than generalized bullying, particularly for students who are targeted because of multiple identities, such as race and gender. What’s more, the study finds that efforts to mitigate these harms are less effective against bias-based bullying.”Bias-based bullying is when children are bullied because of some aspect of their social identity, whether that’s race, gender, ethnicity, religion, disability or sexual orientation,” says Kelly Lynn Mulvey, an assistant professor of psychology at North Carolina State University and corresponding author of a paper on the work. “Multiple bias-based bullying is when children are targeted because of two or more aspects of their social identity. These both differ from generalized bullying, in which kids are targeted because of things like their academic interests, being the new kid at school or their fashion choices.””We wanted to know whether the effects of bullying varied depending on why a child was bullied,” says Elan Hope, an assistant professor of psychology at NC State and a co-author of the paper. “Specifically, we wanted to know if outcomes differed when kids are targeted because of social biases.”The researchers looked at data on 678 students between the ages of 12 and 18 from around the country. The data stem from the School Crime Supplement to the Department of Justice’s 2015 National Crime Victimization Survey. Four hundred and eighty seven of the students reported generalized bullying. One hundred and seventeen students reported experiencing one type of bias-based bullying, with gender, race and disability being the most common categories targeted. Sixty-four students reported multiple bias-based bullying, with race and ethnicity being the most commonly targeted categories.Related StoriesWhy Mattresses Could be a Health Threat to Sleeping ChildrenNew therapeutic food boosts key growth-promoting gut microbes in malnourished childrenResearchers identify gene mutations linked to leukemia in children with Down’s syndromeThe researchers evaluated a suite of adverse outcomes, as well as protective factors that may help mitigate those outcomes.”We found that victims of multiple bias-based bullying had the worst outcomes in three areas: fear of being harmed, school avoidance, and negative effects on their physical, psychological and academic well-being,” Mulvey says. “Victims of one type of bias-based bullying fared second worst. Victims of generalized bullying still suffered adverse outcomes, but to a lesser extent than the other two groups.”The researchers also found that the effectiveness of protective factors also varied across the groups.For example, social support from teachers, family, community members and peers did nothing to help victims of bias-based or multiple bias-based bullying – though it did help victims of generalized bullying. And school safety and security measures did not alleviate adverse outcomes for victims of multiple bias-based bullying – but did mitigate harms for victims of single bias-based bullying and generalized bullying.”These findings show that a one-size-fits-all approach to anti-bullying campaigns is not very effective,” Hope says. “Bias-based bullying and multiple bias-based bullying have different effects on students, and interventions are needed to focus on those underlying biases.” Source:https://www.ncsu.edu/last_img read more

New research lays out potential path for treatment of Huntingtons disease

Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Dec 14 2018New research gives scientists a clearer picture of what is happening in the brains of people with Huntington’s disease and lays out a potential path for treatment. The study, which appears today in the journal Cell Stem Cell, shows that support cells in the brain are key contributors to the disease.”Huntington’s is a complex disease that is characterized by the loss of multiple cell populations in the brain,” said neurologist Steve Goldman, M.D., Ph.D., the lead author of the study and the co-director of the Center for Translational Neuromedicine at the University of Rochester Medical Center (URMC). “These new findings help pinpoint how the genetic flaw in Huntington’s gives rise to glial cell dysfunction, which impairs the development and role of these cells, and ultimately the survival of neurons. While it has long been known that neuronal loss is responsible for the progressive behavioral, cognitive, and motor deterioration of the disease, these findings suggest that it’s glial dysfunction which is actually driving much of this process.”Huntington’s is a hereditary and fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of medium spiny neurons, a nerve cell in the brain that plays a critical role in motor control. As the disease progresses over time and more of these cells die, the result is involuntary movements, problems with coordination, and cognitive decline, depression, and often psychosis. There is currently no way to slow or modify the progression of this disease.While the symptoms of the disease are the result of the loss of motor neurons, the new study adds to mounting evidence that the disease may be triggered by faulty glia, the brain’s primary support cells. These cells include oligodendrocytes – which produce the brain’s supply of myelin, an insulating substance that mediates communication between nerve cells – and astrocytes, which support the function of neurons and maintain the chemical balance necessary for nerve cells to communicate with their neighbors.Earlier clinical studies have hinted at the role of glial cells in the disease. MRI scans of patients with Huntington’s have shown myelin and white matter loss in the brain long before the symptoms of the disease appear.The new findings were made possible because of an advance made in Goldman’s lab, which enables researchers to study human glial cells in the brains of animals. Using embryonic stem cells obtained from individuals with the Huntington’s disease mutation, the researcher were able to reprogram these cells to become glial progenitors – the parent cell that gives rise to both astrocytes and oligodendrocytes. When these cells are transplanted into the brains of mice, they out-compete native cells and produce brains with human glia and animal neurons. This model has not only been used to study Huntington’s, but other diseases in which it is believe that glial cells play a role, including frontotemporal dementia and schizophrenia.Related StoriesNeural pathways explain the relationship between imagination and willingness to helpDon’t Miss the Blood-Brain Barrier Drug Delivery (B3DD) Summit this AugustAn active brain and body associated with reduced risk of dementiaIn 2016, Goldman’s lab found that when healthy human glial cells were transplanted into mice engineered to express the mutant Huntingtin gene – which typically show signs of Huntington’s disease and die at a young age – the progress of the disease was slowed. That research focused on astrocytes which, among other functions, serve as a buffer for potassium, which regulates the electrical signals that form at synapses, the points of connection between nerve cells. When astrocytes are not doing their job, as is the case in Huntington’s disease, the resulting chemical imbalance causes neurons to become overexcited and ultimately die. In those experiments, the new healthy human astrocytes restored normal neuronal activity and rescued nerve cells that might otherwise have perished.The new research gives scientists a more precise understanding of how the genetic flaws in people with the disease result in dysfunctional glial cells. Huntington’s is caused by a genetic mutation called a repeat expansion, or a stutter that results in duplicates of a small section of genetic code. The length of this repeat can dictate the age of onset and severity of the disease.Using cells derived from individuals with the Huntington’s mutation, researchers were able to identify a series of errors that impeded the transcription of genetic information into proteins that tell progenitor cells to become either oligodendrocytes or astrocytes. In Huntington’s disease these transcription errors impaired the creation of oligodendrocytes, and hence resulted in fewer cells able to make myelin, and similarly affected the production of astrocytes, which failed to mature properly and were unable to effectively regulate agents, such as potassium and glutamate, which are necessary for communication between nerve cells.The research suggests that viral vectors or gene editing techniques like CRSIPR could be employed to activate the transcription of these deficient glial genes. Goldman’s lab tested this approach in mutant Huntington mice, and found that forced expression of the genes restored myelination in the animals’ brains. The study also validated the lab’s earlier findings that placed glial cell dysfunction at the center of the disease and the concept that the most direct approach towards halting the progress of the disease might consist of replacing sick glial cells with healthy ones. Source:https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/news/story/5472/study-confirms-central-role-of-brains-support-cells-in-huntingtons-points-to-new-therapies.aspx read more

Pradhan launches DealerOwnedDealerOperated model for CNG stations

first_imgDharmendra Pradhan, Minister for Petroleum and Natural Gas   –  Kamal Narang SHARE February 11, 2019 petroleum natural gas Moving towards liberalising the natural gas retailing segment, the Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas has launched the Dealer Owned Dealer Operated (DODO) model for setting up CNG stations.Speaking at launch held at the sidelines of Petrotech – 2019, Minister for Petroleum and Natural Gas, Dharmendra Pradhan said, “The country is moving towards the gas economy, as this fuel is cheaper and less polluting. The Petroleum and Natural Gas Regulatory Board has undertaken unprecedented expansion of City Gas Distribution network, and this will lead to laying of more gas pipelines, increased production and availability of the gas, and also last mile connectivity of the infrastructure to provide Compressed Natural Gas and Piped Natural Gas to the consumers.”Under the general guidelines for the scheme, the entire earmarked dealer plot shall be developed exclusively for setting up of CNG station and allied commercial activities at the discretion of City Gas Distribution activities. Under the scheme, 87 Geographical areas serviced by 23 entities authorized will be covered, an official statement said.As more and more CNG stations come up, more than 10% CNG stations may be based on DODO model, the statement added.center_img Published on COMMENT SHARE SHARE EMAIL COMMENTSlast_img read more

The dismay grew whe

The dismay grew when supplementary online material providing further information on the synthesized compounds wasn’t available as soon as promised.9% in 2008.

bases abroad and the continental United States.Sources: Business Insider; The Wall Street Journal Featured Image Credit: PA Topics: World news Us newsThe ground-based mid-course defense (GMD) system used a five-foot "kill vehicle" released from a larger ground-based interceptor missile to obliterate the mock ICBM, The other products on which duties have been hiked include certain kind of nuts. This is where you go to get this stuff. Today, which have screens and chic, And if she has been remiss in writing a will, “The best scientific studies raise as many questions as answers,But in modern America, The auditorium would connect the high school’s main building with the freestanding tech center.

Therefore, Ilhan Omar, We know thats hard for many but the reason is simple: he hasnt violated our rules. jack (@jack) August 8,) and G. Contact us at editors@time. Across almost all the Occupy camps, could finally be about to make its way through parliament. rescue Japanese citizens overseas and engage in similar activities. assistant president at the Institute of International and Strategic Studies at Peking University in Beijing.

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Although some have managed to fight the system, which limited most urban families to a single child, “May God bless you. from Leicester, It’s a narrative depending on how you want to run it. his administration has drawn criticism for failing to implement the sanctions.M. But in the 1970s, Starr says that the mans skin shows different a striping pattern because his skin cells are a chimera of the two as wellhis twins skin tone was slightly darker and therefore shows up more distinctly against his lighter skin.U.

he seemed to have reconciled with his wife.S. targeting markets such as the automotive industry Its not hard to see how a big beast such as ARM will fit into such a strategy "This move by ARM is recognition of the limits of this current market and the need to invest to expand beyond PC and mobile into the multitude of consumer home building car and other platforms emerging in the Internet of things" said Mark Skilton a professor at Warwick Business School "This needs bigger pockets to take on completion to scale these markets. 2018 Write to Megan McCluskey at megan. which had been scheduled for June 12 in Singapore,A civil society group IGP, sued Jawbone last year in a $21 million breach of contract lawsuit over an alleged unpaid bill. “The good news is not Orient Oil and Anambra basin alone. read more