Assam BJP leader praises JNU poll winner, quits party

first_imgA BJP leader in Assam has quit his post in the party’s Information Technology and Social Media department after his praise for a Leftist woman from Assam, who won in the Jawaharlal Nehru Students’ Union polls, drew criticism.In a letter to Assam BJP president Ranjeet Kumar Dass on Tuesday, Suranjan Dutta said he was resigning from the post of co-convenor of the party’s social media wing for causing “hurt” to party workers for praising the election of Srijani Bhaswa Mahanta as a councillor for the university’s School of International Studies.Ms. Mahanta, who represented the Students’ Federation of India (SFI), is the daughter of Assam’s Additional Director General of Police Bhaskar Jyoti Manahta. She was elected councillor along with another woman from Assam — Karabee Kakati of the All India Students’ Association (AISA).Members of SFI, AISA, and the Democratic Students’ Federation (DSF) contested as United Left to defeat the BJP’s youth wing, the Akhil Bharatiya Vidyarthi Parishad (ABVP), in this year’s JNUSU polls.Many party workers and supporters had panned Mr. Dutta when he took to Facebook to praise Ms. Mahanta’s victory, accusing him of taking a Left turn.“…one of my Facebook posts have demoralised and hurt our karyakartas (workers) and I am also in mental agony now. I have admitted my moral responsibility for that Facebook post and hence, asking for apology from everyone,” he wrote in his resignation letter.Assam BJP’s general secretary Dilip Saikia accepted Mr. Dutta’s resignation letter.last_img read more

Awesome Foursome

first_imgA side is only as good as its leader. Now we have heard comments like “my grandmother could have led the Australian sides in the 1990s to victory”, but they belittle the role of a captain in sport. The captain’s role in any international team is absolutely critical. The captain has to bring the best out of his players. His job is not to teach them how to play but to encourage them to give their best. It may or may not result in a match-winning performance on a certain day but pays off in the long run.Mike Brearley, in his Art of Captaincy, has done a wonderful job in highlighting the role of a captain. When a side is habitually winning, as was common for the West Indies under Clive Lloyd and Australia under Steve Waugh, it is easy to miss the importance of leadership. One has to only look back at West Indies cricket before Lloyd took over to see his contribution. He was able to get the players to rise above their inter-island (inter-country) rivalries and perform under the West Indies flag to become possibly cricket’s greatest team ever. Waugh raised the level of Australia a notch when he took over captaincy.Who would have imagined India winning the World Cup in 1983, or Sri Lanka in 1996? But leaders like Kapil Dev and Arjuna Ranatunga were able to rally their forces admirably, winning the small battles as well as the final frontier by beating seemingly invincible teams. In all World Cups, it’s not about winning the first few games but peaking at the right time. Sides such as South Africa have peaked early and then gone on to lose crucial semi-finals. The World Cup is a marathon, not a sprint. The side that plays best when it reaches the quarter-finals with its players peaking at the right time will be the one that comes out on top.advertisementEach successful captain brings something special to the table, something he shares only with his team members. Different captains have different styles. When I became England’s captain, they had hit rock bottom and needed a firm leader to give them a push up. By the end of my reign, they needed a captain such as Michael Vaughan to help them to go out and express themselves in a carefree manner as they did in the 2005 Ashes series. For this World Cup, all captains will be working out their plans. A captain’s success also depends on his equation with the coach. India and England owe a lot of their recent successes to their respective captain-coach combines. The coach is an integral part of a captain’s success.(Top left) Kumar Sangakkara, M S Dhoni, Andrew Strauss and Ricky PontingA lot will rest on the shoulders of the men I consider as the top four captains of this World Cup. M.S. Dhoni has led India admirably over the past few years. He is calm and unflappable under pressure and seems to be enjoying captaincy. The Indians will be under a lot of pressure at home, and Dhoni will have to alleviate the pressure from his boys. That will hold the key to India’s success in the World Cup. His very successful partnership with coach Gary Kirsten will be put to its toughtest test yet.Kumar Sangakkara is captain of a young and strong Sri Lankan side, which is ranked third on the icc’s odi charts. Like Dhoni, he is also going to feel the “home” pressure, but the Lankans have a solid record at home.Ricky Ponting and Australia can never be counted out. The Aussies are no longer a “great” side, but they are still the world’s top-ranked odi team. Ponting has the capability to inspire his boys and lead a final onslaught but it’s not going to be as easy as it was in the previous three World Cups.Andrew Strauss and Andy Flower have worked brilliantly as a team and inspired England to become the No. 3 Test team. Despite their recent loss to Australia in the odi series, after retaining the Ashes convincingly, England will be a dangerous side. They can beat anyone on their day and Strauss has his team’s backing to the hilt.The dark horse of the tournament is definitely Pakistan. They may be down in the rankings but can never be underestimated. They have been through much turmoil and scandal. Shahid Afridi and his boys will be itching to set things right.The writer is a former captain of the England cricket teamadvertisementlast_img read more