Riley Dixon named to All-ACC 1st team, Brisly Estime and Ron Thompson to 3rd

first_imgSyracuse punter Riley Dixon has been named to the All-Atlantic Coast Conference first team, SU announced Monday afternoon. He is the first player in the program’s three-year tenure in the conference to receive first-team honors.Dixon received 77 votes compared to 75 garnered by Wake Forest punter Alex Kinal, who was placed on the second team. Dixon averaged 43.7 yards per punt this season, with more than 43 percent of them downed inside the 20-yard line. He only tallied five touchbacks and logged a long of 64 yards and 18 punts that went at least 50. Dixon was one of 10 semifinalists for the Ray Guy Award given to the nation’s top punter but didn’t make the list of three finalists.Wide receiver and return specialist Brisly Estime and defensive end Ron Thompson were named to the third team. Estime received the honors as a return specialist, ranking second in the country and first in the ACC with 18.1 yards per punt return. He was the first SU player since 1997 to return two punts for touchdowns in a season and ranked seventh nationally in combined kick return yards. Those two scores came in the season-opener against Rhode Island and on Oct. 31 against Florida State.Thomspon led the conference with four forced fumbles and recorded seven sacks. He led all Syracuse defensive linemen with 35 tackles and had six tackles, a forced fumble, a fumble recovery and two pass breakups against No. 1 Clemson on Nov. 14.Syracuse’s season ended Saturday with a 20-17 win against Boston College. The Orange finished at 4-8 and 2-6 in the ACC. Scott Shafer was fired as head coach last Monday along with his assistants and the Orange is still looking for replacements.AdvertisementThis is placeholder text Comments Published on November 30, 2015 at 3:17 pm Contact Matt: mcschnei@syr.edu | @matt_schneidman Facebook Twitter Google+last_img read more

For Brad Pike, planning Syracuse’s meals requires close attention to detail

first_img Published on March 23, 2016 at 11:31 pm Contact Jesse: jcdoug01@syr.edu | @dougherty_jesse Facebook Twitter Google+ ST. LOUIS — Following Syracuse’s practice at the Scottrade Center this past Saturday, Brad Pike was a one-man assembly line.Without ever looking at his hands, Pike grabbed small plastic bags, filled them with ice, twisted a tie around the top and added to a pile at the end of the trainer’s table. He told players to come get their ice, held short side conversations with other staff members and even stole a glance or two at the basketball playing on the locker room’s TV. All while the ice kept flowing.But for Pike, whose official title with Syracuse is assistant athletics director for sports medicine, post-practice icing is a simple task. Mindless, even. Just a small part of a season-long routine that keeps the Orange’s tight seven-man rotation as fresh as a tight seven-man rotation can be during an NCAA Tournament run in late March.And as that routine rolls along, the same question always lingers in the back of Pike’s head. A very important question. A question that can be the difference between SU’s players feeling settled or unsatisfied at the end of the day. A question that everyone thinks about but Pike has to answer, not just for himself but for a team of college-aged men and the full Syracuse basketball staff.What is the team’s next meal going to be?AdvertisementThis is placeholder text“I plan all of our meals on the road,” Pike said, still twisting bags of ice. “… I want to make sure to fill their stomach up with good stuff so they’re not looking for bad stuff later.“Or, if they do look for the bad stuff later, it’s going to be in a small amount versus, ‘I didn’t really like the food, I didn’t eat anything.’”When Syracuse received an at-large bid to the NCAA Tournament two Sundays ago, Pike started considering the travel variables: St. Louis, a city he hasn’t visited with the Orange, is in the Midwest. The Midwest traditionally has good beef. Beef is one of the core entrees of the Orange’s five-meal rotation. A good start, but only the beginning.Pike then flipped open his laptop and got to work, pulling up a spreadsheet that shows every meal SU has eaten on the road over the last five or so seasons. He has the meals sorted by date, hotel and, most importantly, quality. He’s started to see trends in this matrix of ingredients and hotel chains, like what to eat in certain regions of the country and what different hotels make well. That was how he mapped each meal for the Orange’s five-day trip to St. Louis — which eventually included two wins in three days to advance to the Sweet 16. By 2 p.m. that Monday, Pike was finished and he called the St. Louis City Center Hotel to start discussing his meal-by-meal plan. When the Orange landed there Wednesday, the next step was to make sure it unfolded seamlessly.“There are always wrinkles, like last year I gave in on bacon because Rakeem Christmas was a bacon addict,” Pike said. “But then I worry about the hotel keeping it crispy enough, and other things like trying to make the meals too gourmet and putting in oils and butters. We try and keep it a bit cleaner. This hotel in St. Louis did a great job of that, but I worry.”A lot of what Syracuse does on the road, in terms of food, fits the season-long roadmap. Pike makes sure there are healthy sandwiches within an hour of the team’s workouts every day to restore the glycogen in the players’ muscles. He tries to make sure each rotational player drinks half his body weight in ounces of water every day, which decreases fatigue and gets rid of the byproducts of exercise. There’s always pasta the night before games. There’s always things to consider at breakfast, like if he can get the preferable cage-free eggs and which players’ stomachs are sensitive to certain “mixes” in the morning.Somewhere in between all that, the meals are plugged in.“It pretty much goes like this, Brad points us all to a room and then there’s just all this food in there,” said SU walk-on Doyin Akintobi-Adeyeye. “And really it’s like, ‘Damn, where did this all come from?’ We don’t even see it. And it’s not just food anyone can make, it’s good.”Syracuse is already in Chicago, where a Friday night meeting with 11th-seeded Gonzaga awaits. Last weekend, Pike said he felt good knowing the team was probably staying in a nice hotel with a good chef. But there will always be questions. Is the cod as good there as it was in St. Louis? What’s the signature meat? What else does Chicago traditionally do well?And then there’s the deep-dish pizza, a staple of the city’s food vernacular. Will there be room for that on the menu?“Pizza is not bad,” Pike said smiling, then straightened his face and realized he’s responsible for 17 impulsive eaters. “I mean it can be bad. Anything in excess is bad. I’ll have to watch out for that.” Commentscenter_img Related Stories How Dajuan Coleman can provide an added bonus for SyracuseBlum: Syracuse playing rest of NCAA Tournament on borrowed timeWhy Tyler Roberson can be a consistently dominant rebounder for SyracuseSyracuse basketball opponent preview: What to know about GonzagaSyracuse basketball roundtable: How to handle Gonzaga’s threats and how SU can improvelast_img read more

98% of new COVID-19 cases reported Tuesday are from 22 counties where restrictions remain in place

first_imgJOHNSTON — Governor Reynolds says most of the new test-confirmed COVID-19 cases in today’s report from the Iowa Department of Public Health are among residents in the counties where her pandemic-related orders are still in place until May 15th.“Today we had 508 new positive cases for a total of 6376 positive cases. 98% of those positive cases were in the 22 counties where restrictions remain in place.”Reynolds says another “Test Iowa” testing site will be active starting tomorrow.  “Tomorrow a second Test Iowa site will be opening in Waterloo at Crossroads Mall. Testing for now is prioritized for essential workers and people who currently have symptoms of COVID-19, have been in contact with someone who has the virus, or have been recently in areas where it’s more widespread.”Reynolds announced on Monday that she will allow many businesses in 77 of Iowa’s 99 counties to reopen on Friday but at 50 percent of normal operating capacity.Iowa Department of Public Health deputy director Sarah Reisetter says guidance for restaurants that want to reopen this weekend will be placed on their website coronavirus.iowa.gov.   “Restaurants are required to limit seating to 50% normal capacity, limit group sizes to no more than six people, arrange seating to provide a minimum of six feet between tables, prohibit customer self-service of beverages or food including buffets and salad bars, implement reasonable measures to ensure social distancing of employees and customers.”Reisetter says the additional measures also include an enhanced cleaning schedule, eliminating seating at bar areas, and encouraging restaurants to use a reservation-only system.  “Customers can even be screened upon arrival by asking if anyone in the party has tested positive, has any symptoms or has been exposed to COVID-19. All employees should be screened before each shift and immediately excluded from the workplace if they have any symptoms. Employees with direct customer contact should wear masks that are laundered or replaced daily, and work stations should be staggered so employees are stations at least six feet apart whenever possible.”Nine more deaths were reported for a total now of 136. 143 new confirmed cases have recovered for a total of 2164. No new COVID-19 cases were reported from our immediate listening area.last_img read more