Video: Draymond Green Drops Surprise Visit On Michigan State During Film Room

first_imgDraymond Green visits Michigan State coach Tom Izzo.drayond green visits michigan stateThursday, Michigan State basketball opens up The Wooden Legacy tournament, played in Anaheim, with a contest against Boston College. Wednesday night, the team had a surprise visit from a former player who now plays for the best team in the state of California. Draymond Green, who stars for the Golden State Warriors but played his college ball at MSU, stopped by during film session to see his former teammates – and, of course, head coach Tom Izzo. Check it out:Green has the Warriors off to a 16-0 start. Perhaps his influence will help the Spartans do the same.last_img read more

Video: Clemson’s Shaq Lawson Held Back From OU’s Charles Tapper Before Kickoff

first_imgShaq Lawson gets held back from Charles Tapper during pregame.Clemson and Oklahoma are just under one hour from kickoff, but it looks like both teams are ready to start hitting each other. Just minutes after OU quarterback Baker Mayfield got into it with a Tigers player, Clemson’s Shaq Lawson had to be held back from going after Sooners star Charles Tapper on the field during pre-game warmups.David Hood of Tigernet.com and Campus Insiders both captured video. The incident comes a day after Lawson reportedly boarded Oklahoma’s bus to talk trash after a team luncheon.Jacoby Ford pulls Shaq Lawson away from Tapper in pregame pic.twitter.com/yHWG7rWW8j— David Hood (@MDavidHood) December 31, 2015WOW!!! Clemson’s Shaq Lawson running real hot in pre-game… Lot of trash talk down here. Wow!!! #OrangeBowl pic.twitter.com/K5CcJ4IWXc— Campus Insiders (@CampusInsiders) December 31, 2015Let’s hope the game is as entertaining as the build-up.last_img read more

April 20 2001 Timothy Balker a pilot from Embry

first_imgApril 20, 2001Timothy Balker, a pilot from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University in Prescotthad to make an emergency landing on the north side of the Arcosanti dirt road.He was flying a Cessna 178 heading for Phoenix, when a leak in an oil line obscuredvisibility and forced him to land on our property. [Photos by Jeff Manta] View all the images after the landing:last_img

Rep Allor hosts September office hours

first_img Categories: Allor News Rep. Sue Allor of Wolverine has announced September office hours for Alcona, Alpena, Cheboygan, Iosco and Presque Isle counties.“Holding local office hours is a great opportunity for me to listen to people,” Rep. Allor said. “I invite residents to come and share their ideas and concerns regarding local and state government. I am here to help in any way I can.”The schedule for office hours is as follows:Monday, Sept. 11-10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at Cabin Creek Coffee House, 201 N. Second Ave.  in Alpena;-12:30 to 1:30 p.m. at The Flour Garden, 105 S. State St. in Harrisville; and-2:30 to 3:30 p.m. at Big Boy Restaurant, 1222 E. US 23 in East Tawas.Friday, Sept. 15-10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at Karsten’s Restaurant, 1072 W. 3rd St. in Rogers City; and-1:30 to 2:30 p.m. at The Thirsty Sturgeon, 11900 Scott Road in Wolverine.Residents also may contact Allor at her Lansing office at (517) 373-0833 or SueAllor@house.mi.gov.##### 06Sep Rep. Allor hosts September office hourslast_img read more

Nick Cohen Former BBC multiplatform commissioner N

first_imgNick CohenFormer BBC multiplatform commissioner Nick Cohen has returned to the TV industry after three years at advertising firm Mediacom by joining Little Dot Studios.Cohen will be VP, content, strategy and brand partnerships at All3Media-backed Litte Dot, which Andy Talor and Selma Turajlic founded 18 months ago.He joins in February from WPP-owned Mediacom, where he is managing partner and head of content.Little Dot now creates content and manages YouTube channels for the likes of ITV, Channel 4, Pepsi Max, Cadburys, Benefit Cosmetics and Unilever; and also operates original YouTube channel Daily Mix.Cohen, meanwhile, is best known as multiplatform factual commissioner at UK pubcaster the BBC, and as director of broadband and interactive television development, EMEA, at Turner Broadcasting System.“Digital video is the single most exciting area of the media industry right now, and it’s start-ups like Little Dot who are shaping this new world and creating the content formats of tomorrow, so I’m incredibly excited to be joining Selma, Andy and the team,” said Cohen.“This is a vital period of growth for our business and Nick brings a wealth of experience, both from leading content for the UK’s largest agency, and from his many years as an award-winning producer and commissioner,” said Taylor. “Selma and I are delighted to have him join the team.”last_img read more

If you have any interest at all in making the kind

first_img If you have any interest at all in making the kind of money most investors only dream about, you simply have to speculate in today’s junior precious metals explorers.  Historically, they reverse with a vengeance after the kind of extreme overbought conditions we’re seeing today… like Conquistador, which rose 1,874% in 1996… Silverado Mines, which shot up 3,988.5% in 1980, or Golden Scepter, which skyrocketed 7,650% in 1983. To show you why the precious metals sector is on the cusp of rewarding bold speculators with similar gains and how to position yourself to maximize this opportunity, Casey Research is hosting Downturn Millionaires.  This must-see web video event features contrarian investing legends Doug Casey and Rick Rule, who have leveraged beaten-down markets to fortunes multiple times for themselves and their clients… John Mauldin, chairman of Mauldin Economics … Bill Bonner, founder of Agora Publishing… and Casey Research Chief Metals and Mining Investment Strategist Louis James, who will reveal what to look for in a junior mining company, as well as one company with millions of proven ounces of gold in the ground that’s selling at a huge discount. Downturn Millionaires premiers at 2 p.m. on April 8 – to reserve your spot, click here now. Natural resource investors have experienced a tough year. The price of gold bullion has fallen from its 2011 highs and the prices of even good junior companies have been slashed to as little as half of their former valuations. All the more reason to start returning broker phone calls according to David Galland, Casey Research managing director, speaking on the Friday eve of the airing of a webinar he is moderating, featuring some of the biggest names in the industry. The webinar, “Downturn Millionaire: How to Make a Fortune in Beaten-Down Markets,” features Casey Research Founder Doug Casey, Sprott Global Resource Investments Founder Rick Rule, International Speculator Editor Louis James, “Endgame” Author John Mauldin and Diary of a Rogue Economist Editor Bill Bonner. In this interview with The Gold Report, Galland shares the motivation behind assembling this all-star cast for a golden wake-up call. The Gold Report: You are moderating a webinar for Casey Research titled “Downturn Millionaire: How to Make a Fortune in Beaten-Down Markets.” This is going to air on Monday, April 8. It’s an interesting title considering the current state of the precious metals market. Gold hasn’t even flirted with $1,900/ounce ($1,900/oz) since 2011 and dropped below $1,600/oz. Silver fell from $43/oz that same year to below $30/oz. Will this conference deliver the painful message that the bull market is over or do you have some good news for listeners? David Galland: We have some good news. The genesis of the webinar is somewhat interesting. Long-term friend Rick Rule, founder and chairman of Sprott Global Resource Investments Ltd., sent an e-mail saying, “Guys, this is a real market capitulation and one of those rare opportunities to make serious money on the rebound.” The proverbial light went off in our collective heads because we, too, have seen this sort of extreme opportunity several times during our careers. And so we scrambled to pull this webinar together in about a week to help make our subscribers and friends aware of the importance of the market capitulation and how to take full advantage. Simply, this is one of those rare moments when absolutely no one wants anything to do with gold stocks, even though gold bullion itself really hasn’t sold off all that much compared to the gold stocks, which are off by as much as 50%. The overarching purpose of the webinar, therefore, is to serve as a gut check and to help people focus on the opportunity. After all, the global demand for minerals is only going to continue to grow, and the role of precious metals is especially important given the complete lack of monetary and fiscal restraint on the part of the U.S. and other large governments. The role of gold and silver is certainly not over, which points to a huge opportunity because the tremendous apathy and capitulation in the gold share market has knocked even the best companies flat on their backs. TGR: The demand argument makes sense, but were the smart people in this group able to come up with the reason why the stocks are doing so poorly compared to the bullion? DG: We discussed the stocks in depth, starting with the macro-picture for precious metals, and then, by extension, why people want to own the stocks. The speakers had some great insights about why we’ve gotten to this point. Then they focused on what they see ahead for the sector and specific ways to profit as the market bounces back. TGR: One of the featured speakers is Doug Casey, chairman of Casey Research. When we interviewed him in January for “The World According to Doug Casey,” he said “speculation is capitalizing on politically caused distortions in the marketplace.” We’ve had years of quantitative easing, but none of the inflation he predicted. Is the government winning? Is that answered in the webinar? DG: I wouldn’t say we’ve had none of the inflation. The government does its very best to cover it up but we all know that prices have gone up considerably on a lot of things. Look at the basics—foodstuffs, energy and so forth. Are governments winning? No, they are just digging themselves and their respective economies a deeper and deeper hole. That said, you could certainly say that at this stage of the battle, people seem to have forgotten that there’s a connection between money printing and inflation. It is baffling because deconstructing the Great German Inflation and other inflations around the world, it was clear to everyone that money printing was the primary culprit. Yet people seem to have once again forgotten that connection. The faculty in this webinar address the questions of where the inflation is heading, why hasn’t it shown up and what can we expect when we see it. The consensus view among the faculty was that we’re looking at inflation rates in the high double digits and maybe worse within the foreseeable future, maybe not tomorrow, but it will come. Governments around the world seem to think that their economies are like washing machines that can be fixed with a bit of tinkering, but they’ll have serious trouble turning off the money printing machines. Social promises have been made, hundreds of millions of people now rely on governments for the bulk of their sustenance. Yet it’s important to remember that governments don’t actually make anything, except maybe wars. Where is the money going to come from for all these social programs? It’s going to be magically whipped up out of thin air essentially. That will have an effect on the purchasing power of the currency units already in circulation, and it will have a positive effect on the prices of tangibles, most importantly gold and silver. TGR: Participant Bill Bonner, who is the editor of The Diary of a Rogue Economist, also watches macrotrends. Does he see any end to the emergency-of-the-week theme playing out on the global stage? And does he have any suggestions for how investors can protect themselves from the fallout? DG: Bill completely understands the role that gold plays in preserving personal net worth, but doesn’t usually discuss gold shares per se. Even so, in our webinar he said something that really got my attention, “The time to buy these shares is when nobody wants to own them, when even you don’t want to own them.” That struck home with me because I’ve been investing in this market since the 1970s, and long ago I learned that the time you really want to back up the truck is when you have exactly the kind of bombed out markets that we have today. As Bill spoke, it really resonated because I, too, have been ducking calls from my broker, and I have a lot of respect for my broker. Worst of all, my broker is calling me offering me financings on great companies that come with five-year warrants, which is a very rare thing and only seen in periods of complete capitulation. But I didn’t want to take the guy’s calls because of the same mistake a lot of people are making at this point, which is just to assume that the market is dead forever when, in fact, that’s very much not the case. TGR: So when David’s scared, that’s the time to buy. Is that what you’re saying? DG: Well, not so much scared. I just didn’t want to hear about the sector anymore. Listening to this webinar inspired me to spend time looking at stocks of companies that I know have great projects, and great management and cash in the bank. Universally, these great companies have sold off by 50-60% or more. Yet, there is nothing wrong with these companies other than this panic out of the risk-on trades in the junior resource sector. That was a real wake up call. TGR: Webinar speaker John Mauldin, author of Thoughts from the Frontline, predicted, in a November interview with us, “John Mauldin’s Roadmap to Surviving the Fiscal Cliff,” that politicians would find a way around the fiscal cliff that was looming at that time, but he warned that the economy would be in for a bumpy ride. In this webinar, did he have any predictions for when or how things would get better? DG: John jokes that even as a relative pessimist, he looks like an optimist when in the company of the Casey Research team. John still thinks there is the possibility of a political solution to the economic crisis. If there is, I haven’t seen it, and nothing on the horizon looks like it’s going to happen as far as I can see. Despite his cautious optimism, John was absolutely in sync with the rest of the speakers’ opinions about the great contrarian opportunity in gold and the gold share market, an opportunity that most people will miss, but shouldn’t. TGR: Another speaker, International Speculator Editor Louis James, stressed the importance of thinking long term when we interviewed him last September for the article “How Investors Can Protect Themselves in a Politicized Economy.” He said the junior market was looking “bottomish” and it looked like a good time to buy. Will he be mentioning what companies he likes in the webinar? DG: He talks about a couple of companies he likes as examples. He’s also quite adamant about the criteria that people should use in deciding what precious metals shares belong in their portfolio and what shares people should be selling now. The reality is that a good number of these companies will not survive this downturn. If you’re sitting on a company with no cash in the bank, an only so-so project and average management, there’s a reasonable chance it’s going to go to $0 even though it may have already gone down by 50%. In the webinar, Louis covers the specific aspects of companies you want to own in your portfolio and the ones you should lose. It’s an important message because these things are, as Doug Casey likes to say, not family heirlooms but burning matches. And the ones that aren’t going to make it just aren’t going to make it. You have to come to that reality. But the good news is that by rotating into the certain winners you can claw back pretty quickly when the market sentiment shifts, as it most certainly will. TGR: Another one of the webinar speakers, Rick Rule, is a very popular expert with The Gold Reportreaders. When he spoke to our president, Karen Roche, last November for an article titled “Be a Risk Manager, Not a Reward Chaser,” he called gold “catastrophe insurance.” Does he have any specific advice for how investors should adjust their portfolios in a downturn? DG: I would say similar to Louis, his message is very clear. There are definitely companies that aren’t going to make it, and then there are companies that are going to make it and make it in a very big way. It was interesting because I’ve known Rick for a couple of decades now and I have seen him give a lot of presentations, but he was very vocal in pointing to an urgency in this market that most people are missing. Rick, Louis, Doug and all of the people on this webinar are really on the same page about this. Investors need a wakeup call. They need to really be paying attention at this moment because it’s one of those rare, once-in-a-generation opportunities to, as John Mauldin says, get in front of a bubble. We’ve seen this before. We saw this in July 1982, another classic capitulation with gold falling from over $800/oz in 1980 to below $350/oz. As you might imagine, the gold shares were completely sold off with the volume on the Canadian stock exchanges falling to next to nothing. But then there were a couple of discoveries in the Hemlo district of Canada, coinciding with a rally in gold, and the market skyrocketed. One of the companies involved in a Hemlo discovery, Golden Sceptre, went from a low of $0.41/share up to $31/share in about a year. Another, Goliath Gold, went from $0.45/share in March 1982 to $32/share in March 1983, an increase of over 7,000%. That sort of opportunity is pretty much only available following periods of market capitulation such as we are experiencing today. People have forsaken reason, and they don’t want to know about gold stocks. That alone should point the way to a classic contrarian opportunity where pretty much everybody who is going to sell has sold, leaving only one way to move—up—for the companies with the right combination of attributes to survive. TGR: So as painful as this has been for all of us over the last couple of years, after listening to these speakers, are you ready to say you welcome a down market for the opportunity it affords? DG: Absolutely. And as I said, it was a complete wakeup call for me. Until participating in the webinar, I had completely stopped paying attention to the sector. Now I am completely re-engaged and talking to my broker again. TGR: Thank you for taking the time to talk to us. DG: It was nice to be with you.last_img read more

From sports drinks to protein powders from compre

first_imgFrom sports drinks to protein powders, from compression therapy to cupping — there’s a whole industry of products and services designed to help us adapt to and recover from exercise.But does any of it work? That’s the question science writer Christie Aschwanden set out to answer in her new book, Good to Go: What the Athlete in All of Us Can Learn from the Strange Science of Recovery.A former high school and college athlete, Aschwanden is the lead science writer for the website fivethirtyeight and was previously a health columnist for The Washington Post.She notes that recovery wasn’t given much consideration back when she was coming up. Now, however, times have changed and recovery is “something that you do — and almost with as much gusto as the workouts themselves,” she says.Aschwanden’s book examines the physiology behind different recovery methods and also offers an assessment of their effectiveness. Ultimately, she notes, the best form of recovery may be an old-fashioned one: listening to your own body.”The most important skill that any athlete can develop is a sense of how their body is responding to exercise,” she says. “How they’re responding to their workouts; how they’re feeling; what it feels like for them to be recovered or underrecovered.”Interview HighlightsOn sports drinks that have electrolytes”Electrolytes” is just a scientific name for salts. These are things that we get in all of the food that we eat. … And so, the idea is that when you’re exercising, you’re sort of creating these extraordinary needs, and … so you need to replace these salts that you’re sweating out. When you sweat, you do lose some salts. You lose fluids. So the idea behind sports drinks is that they’re replacing those. …There are products now that will promise to find your individual sweat rate and individual salt-loss rate, but it turns out you don’t need a scientist looking over your shoulder to figure out how much you need to drink, or how much salt you need after exercise. Our bodies have this really sophisticated mechanism for helping us determine this — and it’s called thirst.On the danger of overhydratingWe’ve been given this message for so long — and so much of it is marketing — this idea that … you have to always be drinking and hydrate, hydrate, hydrate. But it turns out that this just isn’t true. This idea and this concept that we have to be drinking even when we’re not thirsty has led to this problem that can actually be deadly. It’s called hyponatremia. It’s also called water intoxication, but this is something where people drink too much water and they end up diluting their blood to the point where they have all sorts of issues, including your brain can swell. And it can actually be fatal. …I don’t want to make anyone feel like, “Oh, my gosh, I just drank a glass of water, was I really thirsty? Like, am I going to get hyponatremia and die?” That’s not what we’re talking about. And we’re talking about people who are drinking on the order of, like, multiple glasses of water per hour — in particular, while exercising. But really, if you’re not thirsty you don’t need to drink. It really is that simple.There have been multiple people now who have died in marathons from drinking too much. And one of the things that makes this really scary is that some of the symptoms of overhydration look very similar to the things that we think of as being symptoms of dehydration. So for instance, dizziness, confusion, fatigue things like this. And so, in some cases, what’s happened is you have someone who collapses at a race and they’re given an IV and given more fluids, which is exactly the wrong thing at that point for them.On the genesis of Power Bars and what to eat after a workoutReally the idea in the beginning was to create a food that would be convenient for athletes — something to eat after a workout that was easy to grab, easy on the stomach and all of that. But in the intervening years, there’s been sort of this push to think that this is absolutely the necessary thing that you must eat, and that there must be some important component or some important nutrient … that you really need. …There’s nothing inherently wrong with these products — I’ll just say that upfront. They tend to have pretty good nutrients and ingredients for what you need after a workout. But there’s nothing particularly special about them either, except that they’re convenient. … You can have an energy bar or you could have a banana, or you could have a peanut butter and jelly sandwich — which apparently is the food of choice in the NBA. … But the idea that you have to have something that’s a packaged product just doesn’t hold water.On icing after workouts to reduce sorenessThe idea behind icing is that it’s a way to reduce inflammation. When you ice something, you are reducing the blood flow to that area. So basically, if your extremity gets cold, your body sort of shunts the blood into the core to try and keep you warm. During this time, when the blood flow is less to that area, you’re getting less circulation of these inflammatory things that are part of the inflammatory process. The idea here is that you’re going to reduce inflammation and that was, for a long time, really considered a good thing. …Now the thinking [in terms of icing to reduce soreness] is really changing. … We’ve learned that inflammation is actually a really important part of the training response. If you are doing exercise in hopes of getting fitter, faster, stronger, you really need inflammation. You need that inflammatory process. You need your immune system bringing in these inflammatory things that are coming in to make those repairs. So the inflammation process is actually the repair process. Without it, you’re not going to get the same adaptations to exercise that you would otherwise.On the problem with taking ibuprofen before and after a workoutIt’s really common that athletes will take it prophylactically. So they’ll take it before a workout or before a race even. One scenario where it’s really popular is among ultramarathoners. So these are people that are running, say, 50 or 100 or even more miles, and they will take these drugs during the event or before.I remember back in my high school track days, one of my teammates was popping ibuprofen before practice every day. And I know now after researching this book that that’s a pretty bad idea. And there are a couple of reasons for that. The first is that again, [in terms of exercise], inflammation is your friend. If you’re working out, that is how your body repairs itself. So there’s actually some pretty intriguing evidence that taking ibuprofen can impair the repair process from an injury. And that refers both to the type of microinjury that you get from a hard workout — the little damage to your muscle that your body comes in and repairs, and that’s what makes you stronger. But also to injuries like, say, a sprained ankle and things like this. So taking a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug or taking ibuprofen can actually impede the healing process. I don’t think anyone wants to do that.At the same time, I will say, though, if you’re in a lot of pain these are really good painkillers. And that’s probably a good reason to take it. But you want to limit it, and … you only want to take it when you really, really need that pain relief — and not [with] an expectation that you’re going to feel pain.Sam Briger and Mooj Zadie produced and edited the audio of this interview. Bridget Bentz and Molly Seavy-Nesper adapted it for the Web. Copyright 2019 Fresh Air. To see more, visit Fresh Air.last_img read more

In what would likely become the most restrictive a

first_imgIn what would likely become the most restrictive abortion ban in the country, the Alabama House Tuesday passed a bill that would make it a crime for doctors to perform abortions at any stage of a pregnancy, unless a woman’s life is threatened. The legislation is part of a broader anti-abortion strategy to prompt the U.S. Supreme Court to reconsider the right to abortion. Republican state Rep. Terri Collins of Decatur, Ala. defended her “Human Life Protection Act” during, at times, contentious debate on the House floor. “This bill is focused on that baby that’s in the womb that is a person,” Collins said. “That baby, I believe, would choose life.” Democratic lawmakers walked out in protest before the final 74 to 3 vote. During debate, they questioned the motive for an abortion ban in a state that’s refused to expand Medicaid. “I do support life, but there are some people that just support birth they don’t support life,” said Democratic Rep. Merika Coleman of Birmingham, Ala. “Because after a child is born there are some things that need to happen. We need to make sure that child has adequate health care,” Coleman said.Other states, including neighboring Georgia and Mississippi, have passed laws that prohibit abortion once a fetal heartbeat can be detected. But Alabama’s ban would apply even earlier.”When a woman is pregnant, an abortion is no longer legal,” says Collins, explaining the bill. The bill criminalizes abortion, meaning doctors would face felony jail time up to 99 years if convicted. The only exceptions are for a serious health risk to the pregnant woman, or a lethal anomaly of the fetus. There are no exceptions for cases of rape or incest. A woman would not be held criminally liable for having an abortion.Collins says the bill follows a constitutional amendment approved by Alabama voters last year that recognizes the “rights of unborn children.” It defies the U.S. Supreme Court’s landmark decision that protects a woman’s right to abortion.”This bill is simply about Roe v. Wade,” says Collins. “The decision that was made back in 1973 would not be the same decision that was decided upon today if you relooked at the issue.” Her bill cites abolition, the civil rights movement and women’s suffrage as justification for establishing the human rights of a fetus. Alabama is one of more than two dozen states seeking to restrict abortion rights this year, testing federal legal precedent that prevents states from banning abortion before the point at which a fetus could survive outside the womb. Alabama Pro-Life Coalition President Eric Johnston says there’s a reason there’s so much activity now.”The dynamic has changed,” Johnston says. “The judges have changed, a lot of changes over that time, and so I think we’re at the point where we need to take a bigger and a bolder step.” The bold move to outlaw nearly all abortions is drawing protests from abortion rights advocates. A coalition called Unite for Reproductive and Gender Equity demonstrated outside the Alabama statehouse last month. “This bill is an awful piece of grandstanding,” said Amanda Reyes of Tuscaloosa, Ala. She’s president of the Yellowhammer Fund, a group that helps women pay for abortions. “If you make abortion illegal somewhere that doesn’t mean that abortion goes away,” says Reyes. “It just becomes more difficult and more dangerous to access.” The bill is expected to win final passage in the Republican majority Alabama Senate. The ACLU of Alabama says it will sue if the abortion ban becomes law. Executive Director Randall Marshall says the bill is unconstitutional. “There is simply nothing that Alabama can do to interfere with the right of access to abortion,” Marshall says. “That is a federal right and the Federal Constitution clearly trumps all state law.” With two Trump appointees now on the U.S. Supreme Court, anti-abortion forces are optimistic that judicial interpretation could be reversed. Copyright 2019 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.last_img read more

A disabled writeractivist is hoping that his new

first_imgA disabled writer-activist is hoping that his new novel will alert its readers to the “scary” undercurrent of disablism that has been repeatedly stirred up by the government’s “benefit scrounger” rhetoric.The Norwich Wheelchair Murders is Bill Albert’s eighth novel, and its combination of hard-bitten cynicism, sharp dialogue, ruthless gangsters and fast-moving plot has led to it being dubbed the first of a new genre: Crip Noir.It follows the journey taken by Bobby “The Fixer” Fishbaum, who sees “handicapped people” as “big time losers. Disgusting. Unpredictable. Embarrassing. Helpless.”Fishbaum has to flee his penthouse in Santa Monica to escape some vengeful Russian gangsters, and ends up hiding out with his five-year-old daughter in a council flat in Norwich, while also coming to terms with a diagnosis that has left him using a wheelchair.It is a similar journey to the one Albert took himself. Born in New York, the former university academic grew up and studied in California, but has lived in England since 1964, and in Norwich for more than 45 years.He did not discover that he was a disabled person until he finally received a medical diagnosis at the age of 31, but his journey to feeling comfortable with that identity was a gradual one that took at least another 10 years.That journey was aided by meeting other “crips” at a Norwich access group, people whose demonstration of “lives well lived” taught him, he said, about himself and “how to be”.Before he met them, like his character Bobby Fishbaum, he says in a short memoir, he “didn’t know any disabled people. I didn’t want to either. They frightened me, repelled me with their crippled twitching, garbled speech, their unnatural ways.”Taking part in the last of the anti-Telethon demos outside the studios of London Weekend Television in 1992 – where his teachers were “five hundred joyfully angry crips, rolling and staggering and stumbling and drooling and twitching and shouting and singing and waving banners” – was a swift introduction to the disabled people’s movement, the social model and direct action.Soon he was importing some of that back to Norwich, and helping to set up Norfolk Coalition of Disabled People – these days known as Equal Lives – for which he was the founding chair.One of the disabled “role models” who taught him “how to be” was an activist called Brendan Carroll, on whom he loosely based the character of Brendan in his novel.The novel’s dedication says it was Carroll, who died several years ago, and six other disabled friends who taught him “the joys of being a bolshy crip”.Albert says: “I miss him every day. He was a very unlikely, charismatic figure. He really lived a life. I have made him into my crip superhero.”His novel’s other disabled characters are “amalgams” of other disabled people he knows, albeit “a bit more extreme” than they are in real life.The Norwich Wheelchair Murders was, he says, an attempt “to explain disability to the world which was different to how anybody else had done it”.One of its central themes is the extent to which disabled people are subjected to hate crime, something Albert started to become aware of while editing the monthly newsletter for the international disability rights charity Disability Awareness in Action, and from hearing about the experiences of other disabled people in Norwich, particularly those with learning difficulties.As other disabled activists and artists – most notably Liz Crow – have done in recent years, he draws a parallel between the attitudes to disabled people in Nazi Germany that found its most brutal expression in the Aktion T4 programme, which saw the targeted killing of as many as 200,000 disabled people, and similar attitudes that have surfaced in recent years in the UK.As one character in his novel says: “He said most disabled people were little more than a burden on themselves and the rest of us too. Scroungers, he called them, useless scroungers. Already half dead anyway.”It was an attitude Albert noticed as a member of the Human Genetics Commission – between 1999 and 2005 – when he came across views that can only be described as “eugenics” but which had been “crafted in a medical way”, and suggested that “disabled people were not something you would want to choose”.He said: “It’s gone much further now. It’s really scary stuff. That’s always in the back of my mind, because I was right there when it was all being trotted out and debated.”Albert insists that the hateful attitudes espoused by some of the characters in his novel are not that different to the rhetoric spouted by some politicians.He said: “Look at the all the stuff that’s coming out from the government.“They are kind of painting us as very much like that, but not in that kind of stark language, but if you read the sub-titles that’s what you think.”It is reflected, he says, in the everyday experiences of disabled people. “People I know have had nasty comments made to them about being a scrounger.”He adds: “Look what the government has done in the last five years. All the stuff we have fought for, I have been fighting for for 25 years – lots of other people for even longer – has been rolled back. We are going backwards at the moment.”He is still treasurer of Equal Lives, and has been active in the fight against public sector cuts that is a major feature of the organisation’s work – he says many disabled people in Norfolk are being “devastated” by the cuts – although these days in more of a backroom support role.Indeed, just hours before Disability News Service’s interview with Albert, disabled activists and others staged a demonstration outside the headquarters of Norfolk County Council, in protest at further planned cuts to public services.The Norwich Wheelchair Murders does not address government cuts and rhetoric head-on, and instead tries a more subtle approach, hinting at the backdrop of cuts that exists behind the lives of its disabled characters.But Albert says he “absolutely” wants the book to deliver a wake-up call on disability hate crime.“Those attitudes are out there,” he says. “This government has done nothing but stoke them, basically, while saying, ‘We are not against disabled people, we want to help them, they are the most needy,’ which doesn’t mean anything.”last_img read more

A note from the editor Please consider making a v

first_imgA note from the editor:Please consider making a voluntary financial contribution to support the work of DNS and allow it to continue producing independent, carefully-researched news stories that focus on the lives and rights of disabled people and their user-led organisations. Please do not contribute if you cannot afford to do so, and please note that DNS is not a charity. It is run and owned by disabled journalist John Pring and has been from its launch in April 2009. Thank you for anything you can do to support the work of DNS… Disabled activists and their allies have forced a council into a significant climbdown over its “discriminatory” plans for a memorial to victims of the Peterloo massacre.Manchester City Council (MCC) said this week that it had asked artist Jeremy Deller to examine how the memorial he designed can now be made “fully accessible”.The council-funded memorial was set to be completely inaccessible to many disabled people (pictured), even though Deller wanted it to be used as a platform for speakers and demonstrators, mirroring those who spoke during the protest in 1819 that led to the massacre*.The council had previously told Disability News Service (DNS) that it was unlikely that any “fundamental changes” would be made to the memorial, which is due to be unveiled to the public on 16 August, the 200th anniversary of the massacre.But there has now been an apparent climbdown following weeks of protests led by disabled activists.The council’s announcement follows a meeting between city councillors Luthfur Rahman (executive member for skills, culture and leisure) and Tracey Rawlins (lead member for disabled people), and representatives of disabled people’s groups.Mark Todd, a disabled access expert who started a Facebook page to protest at the design of the memorial – and has called it “a monument to discrimination” – said he was “really pleased” at the council’s apparent change of approach.He said that the “breadth and determination” of the campaign and the willingness to work with the council appeared to have paid off.And he said the campaign had built an “amazing coalition” that included disabled people, artists, celebrities, and citizens of Manchester “who all want a Peterloo Memorial that is accessible to everyone”.Among those who have supported the campaign are the musician and activist Billy Bragg, who said: “Surely something that symbolises the struggle for universal rights should be accessible to all.”Disabled comedian and activist Francesca Martinez said it was “extraordinary” that the memorial design had not been inclusive, while there has also been criticism from disabled actor-campaigners Cherylee Houston and Ali Briggs.Briggs said: “We all want a memorial, yes that’s true. We just don’t want one like this, that we can’t be proud of.”Todd said this week that he was “cautiously optimistic” following the council’s statement, but until there was a “fitting and accessible Peterloo Memorial”, the campaign and a weekly vigil near the site would continue.He said: “We are not ready to put away our placards just yet.”Greater Manchester Coalition of Disabled People (GMCDP), which has played a key role in the protests, also welcomed the announcement.But it warned that the council had not yet met its three demands – to stop work on the memorial while it was still low enough to include a ramp; to ensure the memorial was accessible; and to make sure there was no repeat of the council’s failure with future projects – and pointed out that building work on the inaccessible memorial was now nearly finished.Campaigners will meet next week with the council, Deller and the architect working on the project, and will then decide whether to review their demands.A GMCDP spokesperson said: “MCC’s decision to build the memorial to its full height and then explore access solutions afterwards, limits considerably what can be done to make it a platform everyone can use.“We do not know what MCC have in mind, if anything, and we acknowledge that a perfect solution may not be arrived at immediately. “What is needed most at this stage is the commitment to find a genuine accessible long-term solution, properly considered, fully consulted on and backed up with some teeth and a budget.”The council has faced weeks of anger from disabled people and allies that a memorial designed to remember those who marched for liberty and equality in the 19th century should apparently have been “designed and built with discrimination and inequality at its heart”.Now the council has said that it regrets that the design of the memorial “did not give enough consideration to access issues”.Cllr Rahman said: “Manchester City Council has a long and proud record around access issues, something which disabled access campaigners have acknowledged. “However, we recognise that the interpretation of the brief for the Peterloo Memorial, with an imaginative design involving a more interactive element than originally envisaged for a public artwork, did not give enough consideration to access issues and we regret this.“We recently met with representatives of disabled people’s groups to further discuss this issue and we have asked the artist and architect to look at how the monument in its current form can be modified to make it fully accessible.“We will share more details about where we are up to and the proposed way forward as soon as we are in a position to do so.“We are listening and doing all we can to resolve this satisfactorily.”Deller told DNS last night (Wednesday) that he was optimistic that a solution could be found to make the memorial accessible.*On 16 August 1819, paramilitary and military forces attacked more than 60,000 peaceful, pro-democracy and anti-poverty protesters in Manchester, which led to 18 deaths and an estimated 700 serious injuries, in what became known as the Peterloo Massacrelast_img read more

Larsen Toubro Infotech Eyes AI ML and Analytics Market with Lymbycs Acquisition

first_imgLarsen & Toubro Infotech Eyes AI ML and Analytics Market with Lymbyc’s Acquisition Sudipto Ghosh6 days agoJuly 17, 2019 AcquisitionAIanalyticsLTILymbycMarketing Technology NewsNewsSaasVirtual Analyst Previous ArticleSesame Software Partners with Snowflake on Integration/Data Warehouse SolutionNext ArticleEsker Partners, Invests in B/2BNOW in Support of SAP S/4HANA Cloud ERP Acquisition to enhance Larsen & Toubro Infotech ‘s Mosaic platform with Deep Learning, NLP, and Visualization capabilitiesLarsen & Toubro Infotech Ltd., a global technology Consulting and Digital Solutions company, is acquiring Lymbyc. Lymbyc is a specialist AI, Machine Learning, and Advanced Analytics company. The acquisition further strengthens LTI’s fast-growing Digital and Analytics offerings.Larsen & Toubro Infotech will Compete in AI-Based Cloud Computing MarketWith growing dependence on data, global enterprises need to be better at data discovery, agile analytics, and the ability to process large datasets. Lymbyc’s expertise in these spheres will enhance Larsen & Toubro Infotech’s Mosaic platform to provide differentiated analytics solutions in a SaaS model.At the time of this announcement, Sanjay Jalona, Chief Executive Officer and Managing Director, LTI, said —“We believe self-service capabilities for AI and advanced analytics will be the next wave of disruption in the marketplace, and Lymbyc brings this capability to our Mosaic platform. Leni by Lymbyc is an industry-agnostic platform that solves business user’s need for experience, speed, and comprehension. I welcome Lymbyc’s experienced management team and all its employees to the LTI family.”Satyakam Mohanty, Founder, and CEO, Lymbyc said, “As a strategic business partner of LTI during last year, we have seen first hand how LTI is leading data and digital transformation agenda for its clients. With AI becoming increasingly mainstream, we are excited to join hands with LTI and to help a larger and richer set of clients. Leni, our AI-based Virtual Analyst, is perfectly suited to deliver better value to business users and maximize their information and analytics investments.”Getting Leni to Work for Larsen & Toubro Infotech CustomersLymbyc is headquartered in Bengaluru, India. Since inception in 2012, the company has acquired customers in the USA, UK, Africa, and India. The company is well recognized for its unique capabilities in analytics and data-sciences space. Lymbyc was also recognized and featured in Gartner’s Market Guide for Data Analytics and Service Providers 2019.Marketing Technology News: Progress Named a Leader in the New 2019 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Multiexperience Development PlatformsThe core of Lymbyc’s capabilities are centered around a proprietary product, Leni. Lymbyc offers two products:Leni as a serviceLeni as an APICurrently, Leni solves for the entire spectrum of descriptive to predictive Business Insights, leveraging Deep Learning, Natural Language Processing, Data Visualization, and Predictive Analytics. Leni is a Virtual Analyst that allows users to conversationally access information and insights.Leni ServiceMarketing Technology News: WebCEO, the Agency Oriented Marketing Platform, Launches a New Local SEO ModuleLTI and Lymbyc have been strategic partners for the last one year, and have collaborated to deliver unique solutions to several leading global enterprises.Lymbyc is the fifth acquisition by LTI since the company got listed in 2016. Earlier this year, the company acquired Ruletronics, a boutique Pega Consulting company, and N+P (NEILSEN+PARTNER), a Temenos Wealthsuite specialist.Marketing Technology News: Introducing Shutterstock Elements, Thousands of Cinema-Grade Video Effects for Filmmakerslast_img read more

Genetic testing and breakthrough therapies may transform diagnosis care of neuromuscular disease

first_imgReviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Oct 31 2018A new report funded by the Muscular Dystrophy Association (MDA) and released by the IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science indicates that genetic testing and breakthrough therapies will transform the diagnosis and care of neuromuscular disease within the next decade. The report, “Understanding Neuromuscular Disease Care,” highlights current gaps in care and opportunities to optimize care and accelerate the emergence of new therapies. Insights gained from a survey of health care professionals focused on the care of patients with neuromuscular disease are also included.Neuromuscular diseases encompass a broad group of disorders that collectively impact an estimated 250,000 patients and their caregivers in the United States alone. Although these diseases are rare and treatment options are currently limited, the financial impact is high. IQVIA’s report reveals total annual costs across all neuromuscular patients exceed $46 billion. The diagnostic odyssey can often take upwards of a year, although improvements in the speed, price and comprehensiveness of available genetic testing are accelerating the process. The report sheds light on the role data will play in revolutionizing the importance of early genetic screening, intervention and treatment, including through the newborn screening public health program, which has enormous implications on time to diagnosis and intervention.”MDA is in the best possible position to transform the lives of people with neuromuscular disease,” says MDA President and Chief Executive Officer Lynn O’Connor Vos. “As the umbrella organization for more than 40 neuromuscular diseases, and with multidisciplinary clinics providing best in class care at more than 150 of the nation’s top medical institutions, we are galvanizing both industry and the research arena to develop better care and more cures.”Through its comprehensive data hub, MOVR (NeuroMuscular ObserVational Research), MDA is playing a pivotal role in the advancement of research and care in neuromuscular disease. MOVR rolled out in 2018 and will become fully implemented at 50 MDA Care Centers in 2019 to improve the ability for researchers and health care providers to identify precision medicine treatments, enhancing options for care.Related StoriesResearch sheds light on sun-induced DNA damage and repairLiving a healthy lifestyle may help offset genetic risk of dementiaFungal infection study identifies specific genetic vulnerability among Hmong people”The MOVR Data Hub will be extraordinarily powerful, enabling us to capture genome data, clinical data, professionally reported data and patient/family-reported data all in in one place,” says Dr. R. Rodney Howell, chairman of MDA’s Board of Directors. “The data from MOVR will provide benefits both in the present, identifying patients for treatments based on their genomic data, as well as in the future, as new treatment options become available. The study of the genomic data will identify important new genetic modifiers.”Other insights from the study: Source:http://www.mww.com/ “The rapid progress being made in improving patient care and outcomes through the combination of scientific breakthroughs and the development of secure, scalable cloud-based data hubs is remarkable,” says Murray Aitken, executive director of the IQVIA Institute for Human Data Science. “Expectations are high for advancing patient care and bringing disease-modifying therapies across a number of neuromuscular diseases to patients and their families. We are pleased to collaborate with MDA in undertaking research that highlights both the gaps in care and the opportunities to address them in the near-term.”center_img Treatment for neuromuscular disease is generally provided through a multidisciplinary care model, allowing patients to visit a range of specialists synchronously in a dedicated center. Care paradigms and provider treatment decisions may be inconsistent, reflecting the challenges of small patient populations, varied symptoms and a lack of official guidelines, particularly for many of the less prevalent diseases. Adopting technologies for remote appointments and real-time monitoring can improve care management by minimizing patient travel and increasing communication with health care providers. There is a need to develop innovative approaches to pricing and reimbursement to tackle access to care for patients. Psychological symptoms are an ongoing challenge, affecting 75 percent of patients and recognized by 90 percent of neuromuscular disease health care professionals as a high unmet need.last_img read more

Low physical fitness during adolescence associated with later receipt of disability pension

first_imgReviewed by Alina Shrourou, B.Sc. (Editor)Feb 12 2019Obesity or low physical fitness during adolescence is strongly associated with disability pension later in life. This is shown in a study of more than one million Swedish men, published in Annals of Internal Medicine by researchers at Karolinska Institutet.In many countries, disability pensions are granted to working-aged persons who are likely to never work full-time again because of a chronic disease or injury diagnosed by a physician.In addition to serving as an important indicator of chronic disease, disability pensions are associated with high societal costs.Related StoriesEngineered stem cells offer new treatment for metastatic bone cancerBotulinum toxin may offer relief from chronic pelvic pain in women with endometriosisSleep disorders in patients with low back pain linked to increased healthcare visits, costsResearchers from Karolinska Institutet in Sweden and University of Granada in Spain led a study assessing cardiorespiratory fitness and weight for more than 1 million men between the ages of 16 and 19. Data from the Swedish military service conscription registry was used. The researchers then reviewed who would later in life go on to receive a medical disability pension.Over a median follow-up of 28.3 years, the data showed that low cardiorespiratory fitness was strongly associated with later receipt of a disability pension due to all causes. Obesity was also associated with a greater risk for disability pension, with the greatest risks observed for severe/morbid obesity.Important marker regardless of body weightHowever, the researchers noted that compared with being unfit, being moderately or highly fit was associated with lower risk for disability, regardless of BMI. According to the researchers, this means that being physically fit is an important indicator of health irrespectively of body weight.”Our findings support the relevance of cardiorespiratory fitness and healthy body weight during adolescence as important markers of future health”, said Pontus Henriksson, researcher at the Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institutet, and first author of the study. Source:https://ki.se/en/news/low-physical-fitness-in-adolescence-linked-to-higher-risk-of-disability-pension-later-in-lifelast_img read more

Your smartphone could help to speed up cancer research while you sleep

A new research project aims to speed up the delivery of personalised cancer treatments by using smartphones to crunch data while their owners sleep. From thousands of suspects, researchers ferret out cancer-causing genes Researchers at Imperial College London are working with the Vodafone Foundation to recruit people to donate the power of their smartphones and run a simple app, which can help to carry out research overnight.The project will harness the processing power of thousands of smartphones which, when combined, can analyse huge volumes of data in less time than it would take a supercomputer, and at a fraction of the cost of cloud computing platforms.Smartphones contain a huge amounts of computing power needed to run everything from email to music and video streaming apps, but they are mostly dormant while users plug in their phones to charge overnight.Drugs projectAs part of the “DRUGS” (Drug Repositioning Using Grids of Smartphones) project, a team led by Dr. Kirill Veselkov in the Department of Surgery & Cancer at Imperial has designed an algorithm that breaks down enormous datasets into small chunks which can be analysed.Users download the DreamLab app onto their phone and run it for six hours overnight as the phone charges.While they sleep, the app downloads a small bite-sized packet of data – roughly 5 MB in size – and uses the phone’s processors to run millions of calculations, before uploading the results and clearing the data.The app has already been used by researchers in Australia to crunch data for pancreatic cancer, but this project will be the first time it has been used in the Europe.By using the crowd-based approach to work on publicly available data on cancer genes and drug interactions, the Imperial researchers hope to significantly speed up cancer research by identifying new combinations of drugs that may be more effective in fighting cancers in individual patients.Ultimately, using this mobile cloud-based computing approach could drastically reduce the time taken to analyse such vast amounts of data. A desktop computer with an eight-core processor running 24-hours a day would take 100 years to process the data. But a network of 100,000 smartphones running six hours per night could do the job in just three months. Professor David Gann CBE, Vice President (Innovation) at Imperial College London, said: “Through harnessing distributed computing power, DreamLab is helping to make personalised medicine a reality.”This project demonstrates how Imperial’s innovative research partnerships with corporate partners and members of the public are working together to tackle some of the biggest problems we face today, generating real societal impact.”Andrew Dunnett, Director at the Vodafone Foundation, said: “We want to encourage people across the UK to become overnight heroes in the fight against cancer.”Vodafone customers and users of other networks can use their smartphones to enable huge volumes of data to be processed.”This means that Imperial College London will be able to speed up much-needed cancer research in the UK.”Genetic mutations and cancerThe hope is that rather than a trial and error approach of testing cancer drug combinations to see which work best for a patient, data-led approaches such as this could help to identify combinations of drugs to use based on the genotype of the cancer itself.Dr. Veselkov said: “We are currently generating huge volumes of health data around the world every day, but just a fraction of this is being put to use. By harnessing the processing power of thousands of smartphones, we can tap into this invaluable resource and look for clues in the datasets.Using publicly available, anonymised research data drawn from several sources, the Imperial team designed an algorithm to explore how these mutations potentially interact with other genes.”Ultimately, this could help us to make better use of existing drugs and find more effective combinations of drugs tailored to patients, and improving treatments.”The algorithm tests all possible combinations of gene-gene interactions based on existing data from almost one million cancer samples around the world, representing between 30,000 and 50,000 unique cancer mutations.This type of analysis helps to ‘stratify’ patients into groups – ie those which have similar mutations, or gene-interactions in common – based on the genetic makeup of their cancer, rather than classification based on what type of cancer they have, or how advanced it is.Exploring the connectionsThe algorithm also crunches data for known interactions for thousands of registered drugs, showing which genes and proteins they interact with – for instance, some drugs may downregulate a protein which is known to be upregulated by a specific cancer mutation.This data includes cancer drugs as well as repurposed drugs initially designed for another indication. One example is sildenafil citrate, a compound which was originally designed as a cardiovascular drug but is now used to treat erectile dysfunction.By overlaying the results, the team hope to build up a clearer picture of which drug combinations are most suited to patients, based on their mutations.In future, the approach could include pharmacological data on the effects of the drugs and drug-drug interactions, to generate even more detailed information on which drug combinations and doses may work best for patients.Dr. Veselkov added: “Every cancer patient in the UK could have DNA tested within the next decade. The challenge is how to use patients own data for more personalized therapy selection.”In this exciting collaborative project with Vodafone, we have implemented and deployed the machine-learning algorithms on mobile phones to simulate the effect of cancer mutations and drugs on intracellular molecular circuits.”The outcomes will shed light on possible multi-drug therapies against disrupted molecular networks rather than specific mutations in individual cancer patients.” Citation: Your smartphone could help to speed up cancer research while you sleep (2018, May 1) retrieved 18 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2018-05-smartphone-cancer.html Explore further The DreamLab app, showing the D.R.U.G.S. project, led by Imperial’s Dr Kirill Veselkov. Credit: Imperial College London Provided by Imperial College London More information: mediacentre.vodafone.co.uk/pressrelease/dreamlab/ This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. read more

Last Volkswagen Beetle drives into the sunset

first_imgPUEBLA, Mexico (Reuters) – Volkswagen (VOWG_p.DE) rolled the last Beetle off the assembly line on Wednesday, the end of the road for a car that ran from Nazi Germany through hippie counterculture but failed to navigate a swerve in consumer tastes towards SUVs. Serenaded by a mariachi band and surrounded by proud factory workers, the final units of the retro, rounded compact were celebrated at a VW plant in Mexico’s central Puebla state more than 80 years after the model was introduced in Germany. The Puebla factory, which already produces VW’s Tiguan SUV, will make the Tarek SUV in place of the Beetle starting in late 2020, Volkswagen de Mexico Chief Executive Steffen Reiche said. The bigger vehicles are more popular in the United States, the main export market for the Mexico factory. The last Beetles will be sold on Amazon.com (AMZN.O) in a move symbolizing the company’s embrace of the future, Reiche said. “Today is the last day. It has been very emotional,” he said. The current design was the third version of the Beetle after two earlier cancellations and revivals of the marque. The “bug,” as the Beetle was nicknamed, debuted in 1938 as an affordable vehicle commissioned by Adolf Hitler to promote car ownership among Germans. With its funky design and inexpensive price, the car became a success story over subsequent decades and was one of the top-selling models of all time as well as the best-selling import in the United States in the 1960s, according to auto publications. In the 1960s, the Beetle was a small-is-beautiful icon of the postwar Baby Boom generation. The 1968 movie “The Love Bug,” which featured a zany anthropomorphic vehicle, stoked Beetle fever. Despite its place in popular culture, sales of the Beetle have been lackluster in recent years. The German automaker announced in September that the Beetle would go extinct. Reporting by Sharay Angulo; writing by Stefanie Eschenbacher and Anthony Esposito; Editing by Cynthia OstermanOur Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.last_img read more

Governors should aid change for the marginalised President

first_img The Governor is a “mentor and guide” for the State government and can work as an agent of change for the marginalised in a federal structure, President Ram Nath Kovind said here on Monday. He was speaking at a two-day conference of Governors which began on Monday.This is the 49th such conference of Governors and Lieutenant-Governors, during which presentations would be made by National Security Advisor Ajit Doval, NITI Ayog CEO Amitabh Kant and the think-tank’s Vice-Chairman Rajiv Kumar. Prime Minister Narendra Modi will address the concluding session on Tuesday.In his inaugural address, President Kovind said: “The people of the State view the office of the Governor and the Raj Bhavan as a fount of ideals and values.”He said the country’s Scheduled Tribes number approximately 100 million. “As Governors, you can help in the shaping of a road-map for the betterment of lives of our fellow citizens, who have not benefited as much as expected from our development journey.”He said India is blessed with the world’s largest youth population. “As Governors, you are guardians of our youth — in the sense that you can inspire young people to absorb the right moral values and you can motivate them to both pursue modern education and remain sensitive to our Indian ethos,” Kovind said.He said 69 per cent of India’s universities come under the purview of State governments and about 94 per cent of students enrolled for higher education study in these universities.With the Governors being chancellors of most of these universities, Kovind said they should provide the necessary impetus and inspiration to these institutions and enhance the level of scholarship.“You can help ensure that admissions of students and appointments of teachers in State universities are completed well in time and in a transparent manner. You can also help ensure that examinations, declaration of results and convocations take place as scheduled. It is for you to inspire State universities to maintain this discipline and integrity,” Kovind said.The President said it is equally essential to keep the academic curriculum updated to maintain the contemporary relevance of education.“As governors of your States, it is for you to engage the youth and motivate them to use their academic achievements for the welfare of society and of our country. We need to strive collectively for a better life for our coming generations,” he said.Kovind also sought suggestions from the Governors on celebrations for the 150th birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi. “There would be no better way to cherish his memory than to strive for genuine and meaningful social transformation,” he said.The Centre has decided to commemorate the 150th birth anniversary of Mahatma Gandhi over a 24-month period commencing October 2, 2018.“Gandhiji gave us an unfailing talisman. He said that to judge the efficacy of any action we contemplate, we should ask ourselves if it would be of help to the weakest, poorest and most disadvantaged person we know. We must keep this talisman in mind and I would welcome suggestions from all of you to put Gandhiji’s ideals and values into practice,” the President said. SHARE June 04, 2018 Kovind holds conference of Governors, Lt Governors at Rashtrapati Bhavan COMMENTScenter_img SHARE SHARE EMAIL Published on COMMENTlast_img read more

Pradhan launches DealerOwnedDealerOperated model for CNG stations

first_imgDharmendra Pradhan, Minister for Petroleum and Natural Gas   –  Kamal Narang SHARE February 11, 2019 petroleum natural gas Moving towards liberalising the natural gas retailing segment, the Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas has launched the Dealer Owned Dealer Operated (DODO) model for setting up CNG stations.Speaking at launch held at the sidelines of Petrotech – 2019, Minister for Petroleum and Natural Gas, Dharmendra Pradhan said, “The country is moving towards the gas economy, as this fuel is cheaper and less polluting. The Petroleum and Natural Gas Regulatory Board has undertaken unprecedented expansion of City Gas Distribution network, and this will lead to laying of more gas pipelines, increased production and availability of the gas, and also last mile connectivity of the infrastructure to provide Compressed Natural Gas and Piped Natural Gas to the consumers.”Under the general guidelines for the scheme, the entire earmarked dealer plot shall be developed exclusively for setting up of CNG station and allied commercial activities at the discretion of City Gas Distribution activities. Under the scheme, 87 Geographical areas serviced by 23 entities authorized will be covered, an official statement said.As more and more CNG stations come up, more than 10% CNG stations may be based on DODO model, the statement added.center_img Published on COMMENT SHARE SHARE EMAIL COMMENTSlast_img read more