Citizenship Bill won’t directly benefit NRC excludees: Home Ministry official

first_imgNon-Muslims excluded from the National Register of Citizens (NRC) in Assam would not immediately or directly benefit from the Citizenship (Amendment) Bill, a senior Home Ministry official said.The comment by the official, who spoke on the condition of anonymity, comes as the Centre faces a backlash in the northeast, including in BJP-ruled Assam, over the Bill. Those vehemently opposed to the Bill fear that it would make it possible for the government to grant Indian citizenship mostly to illegal Hindu migrants from Bangladesh in Assam, who came after March 1971, in violation of the agreement of the Assam Accord, 1985. Almost 40 lakh people were excluded from Assam’s final draft of the National Register of Citizens (NRC) that was published on July 30 last year. The NRC is a Supreme Court monitored exercise that was carried out in the backdrop of the Assam Accord. Almost 30 lakh of those excluded from the NRC have filed claims to be included in the list of citizens. Government officials would now examine these claims and the final NRC would be published later.The future of those people whose nationality was “indeterminate” was yet to be decided, the official said.“Those who will not make it to the final NRC, does not mean they will immediately get citizenship,” the official asserted. “There will be legal hurdles because in their application for NRC they claimed to be Indians. You cannot suddenly change your stand. There won’t be a blanket citizenship offer.”The Intelligence Bureau (IB) told a joint parliamentary committee on the Citizenship Bill that those who have come to India from the three countries under reference due to religious persecution but have not declared so at the time of their arrival in India “will have to prove that they came to India due to religious persecution, if they had not declared so at that time of their arrival in India.”The law seeks to grant Indian citizenship to members of six communities — Hindus, Christians, Parsis, Buddhists, Jains and Sikhs — who came to India till December 31, 2014. It also reduces the mandatory requirement of 12 years stay in India to seven years to be eligible for citizenship if they do not possess any document.“The Bill is not only for Assam, it’s for the entire country. There are many people who came from the three countries due to religious persecution,” said the official.The official added that the application for citizenship would be approved only after the concerned State government cleared it.last_img read more

Vitol Buys Majority Stake in LSC

first_imgzoom Vitol Netherlands has acquired 19.62% of the total voting capital of Latvian Shipping Company (LSC), LSC said citing a notification from energy and commodities company Vitol.This is equivalent to a total of 39,249,118 shares in the tanker shipping company.The sum Vitol paid for the shares was not disclosed.Since 2002, the largest shareholder of LSC has been Vitol’s subsidiary JSC Ventspils Nafta, owning 49.94% of the share capital.Given that Vitol’s existing shares in LSC amount to 99,880,361, the group’s total shareholding is now equivalent to 69.56% of the voting capital of LSC, the shipping company said in a statement.Currently, LSC’s fleet is comprised of sixteen Handy and MR ships with carrying capacities from 37,211 to 52,684 tons.last_img read more