Trapping sense

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest My most fragrant weekend ever occurred when I worked for the Columbus-based Sportsmen’s Alliance, at the time called the Wildlife Legislative Fund of America. The pro-trapping organization had me man an exhibit booth at the annual National Trappers Association convention at a county fairgrounds in Indiana, where I shared a long, hot September weekend with dozens of trappers displaying their home-brewed scents inside a poorly ventilated, oversized Quonset hut. After two 10-hour days confined with that crew and their pungent wares, it took multiple washings to get the stank of castor-based concoctions out of the clothes I wore, and even my car’s interior retained the scent for more than a week afterward. To this day, the slightest hint of skunk takes me back to those fragrant fairgrounds.Similar scents, albeit less-concentrated than those I endured, may be on the breeze at the Holmes County fairgrounds early this month, during the annual gathering of Ohio State Trappers Association members in Millersburg. The event is open to the public and offers the chance to see professional trappers in action as they lead talks on various techniques that are used for maintaining a sense of balance in Ohio’s furbearer populations. Ohio State Trappers conveneThe 2017 Ohio State Trappers Association Convention will be held September 8-9 at the Holmes County Fairgrounds, 8880 OH Route 39, in Millersburg.  The event and programs are open to the public, and adults pay a $5 entry fee. Kid’s events and an outdoor flea market are ongoing, with an auction held Saturday night. Here is the schedule of demonstrations and their presenters:Friday, Sept. 88 a.m. — Jake Meadows, Fox Trapping9 a.m. — Dave and Karen Linkhart, Team Trapping10 a.m. — Glenn Witchey, Raccoon & Coyote Trapping11 a.m. — Charlie Pierce, Mink TrappingNoon — Butch Barhorst, Coyote Trapping1 p.m. — Dirk Schearer, Nuisance Trapping2 p.m. — Dave Rodgers, K9s and Bobcats3 p.m. — Scott Welch, Trapline Troubleshooting4 p.m. — Harry Kinnison, DP Traps Saturday, Sept. 98 a.m. — Jim Cundiff, Coyote Trapping9 a.m. — Doug Lee, Muskrat Trapping10 a.m. — Jason Webster, Raccoon Trapping11 a.m. — Jeff Robinson, K9 and Bobcat TrappingNoon — Robby Gilbert, Coyote Trapping1 p.m. —  Keith Daniels, Turtle Trapping/Processing2 p.m. — Dave Muir, Trap Regs/Legal Trap Mods3 p.m. — Hal Sullivan, Beaver Trapping4 p.m. — Sam Luther, GinsengFor more information on the annual convention, visit ohiostatetrlast_img read more

EPA announces changes to dicamba registration

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced that it is extending the registration of dicamba for two years for “over-the-top” use (application to growing plants) to control weeds in fields for cotton and soybean plants genetically engineered to resist dicamba. This action was informed by input from and extensive collaboration between EPA, state regulators, farmers, academic researchers, pesticide manufacturers, and other stakeholders.“EPA understands that dicamba is a valuable pest control tool for America’s farmers,” said Andrew Wheeler, EPA Acting Administrator. “By extending the registration for another two years with important new label updates that place additional restrictions on the product, we are providing certainty to all stakeholders for the upcoming growing season.”The following label changes were made to ensure that these products can continue to be used effectively while addressing potential concerns to surrounding crops and plants. Dicamba registration decisions for 2019-2020 growing seasonTwo-year registration (until Dec. 20, 2020)Only certified applicators may apply dicamba over the top (those working under the supervision of a certified applicator may no longer make applications)Prohibit over-the-top application of dicamba on soybeans 45 days after planting and cotton 60 days after plantingFor cotton, limit the number of over-the-top applications from 4 to 2 (soybeans remain at 2 OTT applications)Applications will be allowed only from 1 hour after sunrise to 2 hours before sunsetIn counties where endangered species may exist, the downwind buffer will remain at 110 feet and there will be a new 57-foot buffer around the other sides of the field (the 110-foot downwind buffer applies to all applications, not just in counties where endangered species may exist)Clarify training period for 2019 and beyond, ensuring consistency across all three productsEnhanced tank clean out instructions for the entire systemEnhanced label to improve applicator awareness on the impact of low pHs on the potential volatility of dicambaLabel clean up and consistency to improve compliance and enforceabilityThe registration for all dicamba products will automatically expire on Dec. 20, 2020, unless EPA further extends it.EPA has reviewed substantial amounts of new information and concluded that the continued registration of these dicamba products meets FIFRA’s registration standards. The Agency has also determined that extending these registrations with the new safety measures will not affect endangered species.“It is important that the EPA has decided to renew the registration of over-the-top use of this important weed control technology on dicamba-resistant cotton and soybeans, because it presents farmers with options,” said Sonny Perdue, U.S. Secretary of Agriculture. “This represents the conclusion of a very thorough scientific review, in conjunction with stakeholders, involving site visits and careful consideration of facts. Producers who use this weed control method should review the label, understand why changes have been made, and ensure that all requirements of the label are met when the 2019 use season begins.”Learn more: https://www.epa.gov/ingredients-used-pesticide-products/registration-dicamba-use-genetically-engineered-crops.last_img read more

Stones, bricks pelted at Nitish’s convoy in Buxar

first_imgBihar Chief Minister Nitish Kumar’s cavalcade was pelted with bricks and stones on Friday when he was on his way to Nandan village in Buxar district as part of his ‘Vikas Samiksha Yatra’. Mr. Kumar was not harmed but some security personnel sustained injuries.Kicking off the fourth leg of his month-long tour of the State’s 38 districts, Mr. Kumar reached Buxar and was on his way to Nandan. When his convoy did not stop at a Dalit hamlet, some villagers pelted bricks and stones at it. The windows of some vehicles were damaged and two security personnel sustained injuries. The villagers also raised anti-government slogans. Policemen chased the protesters and resorted to a lathi charge, injuring some of them.“We wanted the CM to see that none of his development work under the Saat Nischay (seven resolutions) programme had reached that part of the village — all development work has been done just to one side of the village, but policemen started chasing us away,” a villager told mediapersons. Later, Mr. Kumar said at a public meeting, “People should not get perturbed over such minor happenings. Some people get disturbed over my commitment to progress of the State. My purpose is not to run the government from the State capital but to assess ground realities and the progress of development schemes.” Earlier in the yatra, when some protesters waved black flags at Sulindabad village in Saharsa, Mr. Kumar had said wryly, “What is wrong with black colour? It is a fine shade. Dissent lends beauty to democracy.”last_img read more