Church in Wales gives ‘amber light’ to Anglican covenant

first_imgChurch in Wales gives ‘amber light’ to Anglican covenant Youth Minister Lorton, VA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Collierville, TN Rector Knoxville, TN Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate Diocese of Nebraska An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Submit a Press Release Rector Smithfield, NC Comments are closed. Anglican Communion, Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Tampa, FL Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Anglican Covenant [Anglican Communion News Service] The proposed covenant that seeks to define the unity of the worldwide Anglican Communion was given “an amber light, rather than a green light” by the Church in Wales on April 18.Members of the Church in Wales governing body voted to affirm their commitment to the communion and the covenant process, but asked questions of the Anglican Consultative Council, which meets in October. They feared the recent rejection of the covenant by the Church of England jeopardized its future and clarifications about that were now needed before a decision could be made.The Bishop of St Asaph, Gregory Cameron, who proposed a motion that was amended in light of the Church of England decision, said, “We have given the covenant an amber light rather than a green light but in doing so we are being honest about where the church is today. However, I think we need to reaffirm our strong commitment to each other through the saving power of Christ revealed in the Gospels. That is what I believe the covenant ultimately calls us to do and I hope one day the Church in Wales will be able to vote for it.”The amended motion, which was carried overwhelmingly, was that the governing body:affirm the commitment of the Church in Wales to the life of the Anglican Communion;affirm its readiness to engage with any ongoing process of consideration of the Anglican Communion covenant;request clarification from the 15th meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council as to the status and direction of the covenant process in the light of the position of the Church of England;urge upon the Instruments of Communion a course of action which continues to see reconciliation and the preservation of the communion as a family of interdependent but autonomous churches.A copy of the briefing paper on the Anglican covenant is here. Rector Hopkinsville, KY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC R.A. GARCIA says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Submit a Job Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Tags Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Belleville, IL Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Featured Jobs & Calls Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Press Release Service April 19, 2012 at 8:59 pm Well, the Welsh of the C. of E. have been faced with the results of awkward and contradictory decisions that have placed the Anglican Communion at the verge of dissapearing and/or splitting into multiple pieces.By itself the Anglican Consultatve Council cannot do anything about a Covenant that has been rejected by the people with authority to act.Outside of the United Kingdom, The imperial mandate of TEC has been at the forefront of rejecting the Covenant and even replacing the See of Canterbury as the worldwide Mother Church. Thus, separations, schisms and more indepedent churches will keep erupting everywhere, while the Church of Rome will be fortified through the Papal Ordinariates.ALL THESE REALITIES ARE DIRECT CONSEQUENCES OF ACTIONS THAT WERE NOT DULY ANALYZED by the “Church or people of God”. Thus, WE must face these consequences and act in accordance …Once again, the the historic apostolic successors should re-evaluate the guidance of the Holy Spirit in the re-evangelization of the pieces left by a no-covenant. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Comments (1) Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 By ACNS staffPosted Apr 19, 2012 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Director of Music Morristown, NJ last_img read more

Archbishop of Canterbury faces ‘a challenge for the imagination’

first_img Submit a Job Listing Archbishop of Canterbury Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Smithfield, NC Archbishop of Canterbury faces ‘a challenge for the imagination’ Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Curate Diocese of Nebraska Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Featured Events Anglican Communion, [Anglican Communion News Service] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby has said that in his new role he, with the rest of the Anglican Communion, is faced with “a challenge for the imagination.”Speaking in an interview with the communion’s official magazine Anglican World, he said, “What do we mean by the Anglican Communion, and how does it contribute as a blessing to the world in which we live in its present circumstances?“That’s something I think Rowan [Williams] has been brilliant at, so have the primates generally, and the ACC — as we see from the range of subjects covered in New Zealand1. It’s something we need to continue.“That challenge to the imagination is something that is constantly renewed and we need to be very reactive to it, and not allow ourselves to get bogged down in looking inward.”The archbishop’s comments are part of his interview in the second edition of Anglican World, a magazine that has been reporting on the life and mission of the Anglican Communion for several decades. Production was suspended in 2007, but it was relaunched in November 2012.Along with the feature on Archbishop Welby, the latest edition features articles on the 100th anniversary of the Anglican Diocese of Iran, a major youth conference in Central Africa, the commissioning of the Mothers’ Union’s new worldwide president, and the triennial ACC gathering of Anglicans from around the world, which was this time in Auckland, New Zealand.The full-color magazine is filled with pictures as well as links to videos of Anglican and Episcopal life from right around the globe. See a preview of this quarter’s edition at http://bit.ly/Z0eYEyA year’s subscription (four editions) costs only £10 including postage (it is still at the 2007 price) and is available from the Anglican Communion Office online shop http://shop.anglicancommunion.orgNotes to Editors·         1 At the 2012 meeting of the Anglican Consultative Council, a meeting of Anglicans from around the world who represent their national and regional Churches.·         The Anglican Communion Office serves the Anglican Communion comprising around 85 million members in 38 regional and national member churches around the globe in more than 165 countries. http://www.anglicancommunion.org Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Tags Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH By ACNS staffPosted Feb 15, 2013 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SClast_img read more

Video: Presiding Bishop opens climate change conference

first_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted May 2, 2013 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Advocacy Peace & Justice, Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Tags Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI [1] An example:  https://www.episcopalnewsservice.org/2013/04/30/episcopal-churches-prepare-for-disaster-create-community-networks/ Comments (1) Rector Bath, NC May 19, 2013 at 3:59 am A huge thank you for these comments. I see no way for humanity to avoid runaway climate change without the full engagement of the faith community. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing Comments are closed. Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Rector Tampa, FL Rector Shreveport, LA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Jobs & Callscenter_img Video: Presiding Bishop opens climate change conference Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Episcopal News Service] Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori opens the May 1-2 “Sustaining hope in the face of climate change” gathering in Washington, D.C., sponsored by the Episcopal Church and the Church of Sweden. The full text of her statement follows.The Most Rev. Katharine Jefferts SchoriPresiding Bishop and PrimateThe Episcopal ChurchThe idea of changing climate elicits grief in many people, as well it should.  That grief finds expression in many of the classic ways that we respond to all kinds of loss.  Some simply can’t imagine that it’s real – and there are still more than a few climate deniers out there.  Some try to find someone to blame, or shift it away from themselves: they say things like:  ‘A bunch of crooked scientists cooked this up to keep themselves in research funds’ or, ‘It’s not my fault, and I will not be responsible!’  Some people are angry enough at the very idea that we might all share some responsibility that they flaunt their wastefulness or charge others with political manipulation of the media.  And some get so depressed that they simply leave the conversation – ‘there’s nothing I can do, so why should I try?’People of faith know another response, particularly in this Easter season.The evidence of climate change due to human behavior is quite literally undeniable.  And the evidence leads to models and predictions which are becoming clearer about the extent of the impact we are likely to experience.Atmospheric warming is leading to greater variability in climate as well as more extreme climatic events.  Floods and drought will continue to become more common, and storms more intense.  We will see more wildfires, rain-induced floods, heat waves, and tidal surges.  Water for drinking and irrigation will be in short supply in areas that used to have plenty.  Aquifers will be depleted.  Food crops will become more difficult to grow in areas of historic cultivation.  We will see disease outbreaks in human beings and in food crops as environmental stress increases.  Disease organisms are likely to migrate toward the poles as temperatures rise, and naïve, unexposed populations will be newly affected – malaria and their mosquito vectors are a good example.  The lack of resistance will mean higher death and debility rates in human beings, livestock, and cereal crops.  Large numbers of species will become extinct – a trend we can already see developing – and the reduction in diversity will mean both lower ecosystem resilience and greater outbreaks of weedy or opportunistic species.The oceans are already experiencing the effects of increased atmospheric carbon.  Acidification from dissolved CO2 is straining the ability of organisms to lay down carbonate shells and skeletal structures – corals and many planktonic organisms, in particular.  They are often significant primary producers at the base of the food chain; and as a result, we will see reduced fisheries productivity, as well as stressed and shrinking populations of sea birds and mammals.Can you hear the hoofbeats of the four horsemen of the apocalypse?  We know that famine, drought, and pestilence often lead to conflict and war.  The ensuing death and destruction are immense and tragic.  We have choices in the face of the doom and gloom before us.  We can choose to ignore those hoofbeats, or we can remember who we are, whose we are, and why we are here.  Our shared credo affirms that we are children of God, made in God’s image, and created for right relationship with God, one another, and all creation.Those horsemen are driven by the ancient demons of individualism, materialism, and selfishness – what today we often call consumerism.  All of them feed on a self-focused fear of scarcity.  The beasts of war can become vehicles of peace and justice when we ride to the aid of another, remembering that we belong to one another.  We do not exist alone; ultimately we will all thrive or die together.  The stuff that so many of us are so urgently accumulating will not save us, make us whole, or heal the emptiness within us.  The stuff that consumes us will eventually also consume many of the other parts of creation – and quite literally burn it to a crisp.The developed world’s drive to consume more and more diminishes our own lives – even at the level of the time and energy we put into finding stuff to buy or working to pay for it.  It soon becomes time stolen from the possibility of healing, like the time that could be spent building deep and meaningful friendships with God and neighbor.  Each consumptive act puts more carbon into the atmosphere as factories and engines churn out commodities to be bought and sold.Yet people of faith know another response than futility, particularly in the face of Easter resurrection.  There is still enough health in us to remember that we are claimed by one who reminds us that we do not live by bread alone.  We are made whole in loving God and neighbor and not ourselves alone.We are gathered here today and tomorrow to learn about the realities of climate change, and to discover ways we can ride to the aid of others, responding to the disaster already emerging.[1]Christ is risen, and the body of Christ is being raised and inspired, God-breathed, to become leaven and spirit in the world around us.  There is indeed abundant hope that the body of God’s creation might also rise – renewed, redeemed, and made whole.  May we be made Christ’s passion, God’s hands, and Spirit’s breath to make it so.Alleluia!  Christ is risen! Associate Rector Columbus, GA ClimateChangeDC, Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Martinsville, VA Ecumenical & Interreligious, An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Collierville, TN Barbara Fukumoto says: Rector Washington, DC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Submit an Event Listing Environment & Climate Change, Rector Belleville, IL Video Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Submit a Press Release Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Press Release Service The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Cathedral Dean Boise, ID TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

Presiding Bishop joins leaders seeking to overcome polarization

first_img Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK May 20, 2013 at 10:14 pm Good luck with Washington, they won’t get it because no money is involved for them.Harry L. Knisely+ Rector Knoxville, TN May 17, 2013 at 7:01 pm I wonder if the Presiding Bishop intends to apply these standards to herself? Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori Tags TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Presiding Bishop joins leaders seeking to overcome polarization Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 May 19, 2013 at 7:07 pm The Presiding Bishop clearly doesn’t think that traditionalist Anglicans are Christians. That would, of course, be the reason why she ordered the Diocese of Virginia to pull out of a civilized, Christian separation agreement it had worked out in favor of spending untold millions of dollars in church resources suing Christians out of their meeting houses. And I guess that would also be the reason why one of TEC’s dioceses, Central New York, sold the buildings and grounds of a departing conservative parish to a Muslim group for LESS than the original parishioners were willing to pay for it. May 26, 2013 at 3:54 pm What are you kidding? Her Curacao sermon about the slave-girl that was exorcised by Paul was nothing more than a rant about how conservatives silence other religious expressions because they feel threatened. She merely uses Paul as a metaphor for any religious conservative. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Bob Ricker says: AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Albany, NY Comments are closed. Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Featured Events Rector Pittsburgh, PA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Washington, DC Comments (7) Rector Tampa, FL Rector Hopkinsville, KY James Mikolajczyk says: [Religion News Service – Washington, D.C.] Twenty-five top Christian leaders gathered in the U.S. city with perhaps the worst reputation for civil discourse May 15 and committed themselves to elevating the level of public conversation.Meeting in a row house three blocks from the U.S. Capitol, the group spanned the Christian spectrum, and included officials from liberal churches and the most conservative of interest groups.“The ground of our spiritual understanding is in treating other people as the image of God, treating people with respect,” said Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori.“Faith leaders have a remarkable opportunity to shift the conversation, but it’s very challenging, particularly in a larger society that wants to understand everything as a battle, as engaging the enemy, rather than with someone who might have something to teach us,” she said.Among the others who joined Jefferts Schori at the two-day meeting sponsored by the nonprofit Faith & Politics Institute were Kenda Bartlett, the executive director of Concerned Women for America; the Rev. Jeffery Cooper, general secretary of the African Methodist Episcopal Church; Barrett Duke of the Southern Baptist Convention’s Ethics & Religious Liberty Commission; and Sister Marge Clark of NETWORK, a Roman Catholic social justice advocacy group.The “Faith, Politics and Our Better Angels: A Christian Dialogue to Promote Civility” forum convened for the first time last year.As religious leaders, they agreed, they are called to move politicians, congregants and Americans in general to understand that mean-spirited debate makes it all the harder to solve the nation’s problems.Sometimes, they said, that may mean calling out people — including themselves — who debate disrespectfully through name-calling or by questioning the motives of their political opponents.“Everyone says they’re in favor of civil discourse, but the lack of civility seems to win elections,” said Ed Stetzer, vice president of research and ministry development at LifeWay Christian Resources.“You need some voice to say, ‘OK, we get that it can win elections, but maybe that’s not the best course of action.’ Typically, we think of religious leaders as voices of conscience, calling people to a better way. So therein is the hope,” Stetzer said.One idea the group is considering, Cooper said, is a national day of civil discourse — perhaps in January, as people are making New Year’s resolutions — when preachers across the country will ask their congregants to make respectful conversation a priority in their lives. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Bath, NC The Rev. Harry L. Knisely says: Posted May 17, 2013 Submit a Press Release An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Advocacy Peace & Justice, center_img Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Associate Rector Columbus, GA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 May 18, 2013 at 2:45 pm The problem with all this is that to many, ending the whole “Us vs Them” means “see things our way”. Press Release Service An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Christopher Johnson says: Sanford Z. K. Hampton says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Benjamin Guyer says: New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Ecumenical & Interreligious, Rector Shreveport, LA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The Rev. Mark R. Collins says: Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ May 17, 2013 at 7:51 pm In the Spirit of Pentecost it is time to end the whole “Us vs Them” way of speaking whether between nations, political parties and Faith Communities. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC May 18, 2013 at 10:04 am ++KJS may not say what you want to hear, necessarily. But she has never belittled those with opposing views; she’s never said that those with differing opinions were ‘not Christian’. She’s stood firm in some cases, but has always called for understanding for those whom have been on the opposite side of her firm stand. She has never called anyone else an ‘abomination’. As she had led our church forward, she’s always spoken with loving care about those who are not ready to move forward, and those who think the way forward we chart is in error. Our Presiding Bishop is an example of a person of forthright faith *and* a tender heart. Those with an equally forthright faith that may guide them in other directions don’t always recognize that. But those with equally tender hearts do.last_img read more

El Consejo Ejecutivo concluye cuatro días de ‘una reunión llena…

first_img Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Miembros del Consejo Ejecutivo y del personal de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera toman un vídeo el 16 de noviembre para Dabney Smith, obispo de la Diócesis del Suroeste de la Florida y miembro Consejo, que se encontraba ausente de la reunión por motivos de salud. El Rdo. Frank Logue, miembro del Consejo proveniente de la Diócesis de Georgia, sirvió de videógrafo. Foto de Jim Simons/vía Facebook[Episcopal News Service – Linthicum Heights, Maryland] Durante su reunión celebrada aquí del 15 al 18 de noviembre, los miembros del Consejo Ejecutivo de la Iglesia Episcopal, rieron, lloraron, cantaron, tomaron fotos y vídeos y trabajaron con lo que el obispo primado Michael B. Curry definió como la sensación de estar “gozosos en Jesucristo”.“Esta fue una buena reunión”, dijo Curry en una conferencia de prensa luego de concluida la reunión. “Fue una reunión llena de júbilo, pero el júbilo, a diferencia de la felicidad vertiginosa, es algo más profundo. No se trata tan sólo de una respuesta para estar alegre en el barrio. El júbilo tiene que ver con nuestro regocijo de estar en Jesucristo. De manera que podríamos estar jubilosos y ser serios respecto a la obra que Dios nos ha encomendado”.Curry dijo que la labor del Consejo se hizo “en el contexto de un compromiso real y profundo de seguir el camino de Jesús; de asumirlo con mayor seriedad y de ahondar aún más en ello y de comprometerse con la evangelización en el mejor sentido de esa palabra, evangelización y reconciliación racial como el comienzo de formas más amplias de reconciliación humana”.Los miembros del Consejo lloraron por los recientes ataques en París y Beirut y cuando se enteraron de las experiencias transformadoras de una reciente peregrinación de jóvenes adultos a Ferguson, Misurí, dijo Curry.La Rda. Gay Clark Jennings, presidente de la Cámara de Diputados, hizo notar que esta era fundamentalmente una reunión organizacional para el Consejo. El [trienio] 2016-2018 no ha comenzado todavía, pero 19 nuevos miembros, cuyo período expira en 2021, se unieron a sus colegas cuyos períodos terminan en 2018 para dar inicio a su servicio. Los cinco comités permanentes conjuntos del Consejo comenzaron a examinar el alcance de su quehacer para el próximo trienio y examinaron las resoluciones de la Convención General que se les remitieron para ser puestas en vigor en los próximos tres años, dijo ella.Jennings le dijo al Consejo en sus palabras de clausura que apreciaba lo que llamó el espíritu “generoso” de la reunión y recordó a los miembros que habían estado hablando de ser elásticos en respuesta al cambio. “Yo sí espero que abracemos la noción de ser elásticos”, recalcó.El llamado de la Convención General a la Iglesia de concentrarse en la evangelización y la reconciliación racial estuvo constantemente presente mientras el Consejo se organizaba. Curry rehusó admitir durante la conferencia de prensa que era el organizador de ese llamado dual, al afirmar que la Convención “habló con una notable claridad que yo realmente creo que es del espíritu de Dios”, dijo el Obispo Primado. “No fue sólo Michael Curry. Creo que esto fue más grande que Michael Curry; esto fue la Convención General”.El obispo primado Michael B. Curry escucha un debate del Consejo Ejecutivo durante la reunión del grupo que tuvo lugar del 15 al 18 de noviembre en el Centro de Conferencias del Instituto Marítimo en Linthicum Heights, Maryland. Foto de Jim Simons/vía FacebookCurry añadió que la evangelización y la reconciliación racial están “íntimamente relacionadas”, haciendo notar que el Espíritu Santo juntó a diversos grupos en Pentecostés. Esos grupos terminaron por encontrar un camino para convertirse en una nueva comunidad basada en el sentir de que los que siguen a Jesús son una familia. “Esta es la obra del evangelio y nuestra Convención General reafirmó la renovación de esa obra”, apuntó.Tanto Curry como Jennings describieron el modo en el que ven la labor de la Iglesia en el proceso de evangelización y reconciliación racial. El Obispo Primado dijo que él concibe a la Iglesia Episcopal dedicada a la evangelización en dos niveles. Uno se centraría en plantar y formar nuevas iglesias, así como en ayudar a las iglesias existentes a encontrar modos de expandir su alcance en las comunidades circundantes. La segunda parte del trabajo, agregó, debe conllevar formar como seguidores de Jesús a “los episcopales que se sientan en los bancos un domingo tras otro”, de manera que ellos vivan deliberadamente como cristianos y crezcan en la auténtica “capacidad de compartir y dar testimonio de la fe que hay en ellos”, recalcó.“Eso es probablemente el impacto más duradero y el que tomará más tiempo y más esfuerzo deliberado”, agregó.Cuando las personas aprenden a contar sus relatos de fe, ayudan a edificar “una Iglesia que se manifiesta viva de varias maneras nuevas”, dijo Curry, añadiendo que esos individuos episcopales entonces “tendrán un impacto en el mundo y en las vidas [de otros] de maneras que nunca podríamos programar”.Imagínense, dijo, si los casi dos millones de episcopales hicieran esto. “Podríamos cambiar el mundo”.Jennings dijo que la reconciliación racial “es una serie de asuntos e intereses inmensamente compleja, y existen numerosas vías para sumergirnos en esto”. La Resolución C019 de la Convención encarga al Presidente y Vicepresidente de ambas cámaras de la Convención “a conducir, dirigir y estar presentes para garantizar y dar cuenta de la labor de justicia y reconciliación raciales de la Iglesia”, apuntó Jennings.Esos funcionarios, además del Rdo. Michael Barlowe en su papel de secretario de la Convención, han estado reuniéndose para discutir cómo llevar la Iglesia hacia delante, dijo ella. Resultó claro, afirmó Jennings, que era importante atender el consejo de Byron Rushing, vicepresidente de los Diputados, quien instó que “antes de que comenzáramos a planificar, necesitábamos escuchar y escuchar intensa y cuidadosamente a las personas que se encuentran a la vanguardia llevando a cabo esta tarea, los cuales pueden conformar cualquier plan o estrategia que desarrollemos para comprometer a todos los episcopales en esta obra vital basada en el evangelio”.Los funcionarios están preparando algunas audiencias y elaborando una lista de personas a quienes quieren escuchar. Jennings predijo que el grupo tendría más información que compartir con la Iglesia en el primer trimestre de 2016.El Consejo tomo la iniciativa de hacer su propia labor en torno a la reconciliación racial durante una sesión del 16 de noviembre con la profesora Keri Day, de la Escuela de Teología Brite. Day enfrentó al Consejo con su opinión de que la Iglesia ha estado y sigue estando situada en lo que ella llamó el “ideal democrático racista de Estados Unidos”.Muchos cristianos liberales, así como muchos estadounidenses liberales en general, creen que el ideal democrático es un “proyecto moral” del cual él país se ha desviado, dijo Day. Sin embargo, agregó, ese ideal se arraiga en lo que ella llamó supremacía blanca. Tal supremacía responde a la manera en que el poder económico y político favorece a los blancos en Estados Unidos y excluye sistemáticamente a los demás.“Debemos decir la verdad acerca de nosotros mismos”, dijo Keri Day, profesora de teología en la Escuela de Teología Brite, instando al Consejo a reconocer que la Iglesia cristiana ha sido cómplice de la construcción de la sociedad estadounidense. Foto de la Escuela de Teología BritePor consiguiente, dijo ella, siempre ha habido una “auténtica barbarie darwiniana” en el tuétano de la construcción de la cultura estadounidense. Los estadounidenses han dejado de valorar todas las vidas [por igual] en su concepción de la democracia desde el comienzo mismo.“Debemos decir la verdad sobre nosotros mismos”, siguió diciendo Day, e instando al Consejo a reconocer que la Iglesia cristiana ha sido cómplice de la sociedad estadounidense y que “el pasado racista de la Iglesia es el presente racista de la Iglesia”.El decir tales verdades, reconoció ella, puede ser arriesgado. Y algunos miembros del Consejo dijeron durante su discusión con Day que ellos se preguntan cómo alentar a las congregaciones de la Iglesia Episcopal a luchar contra el racismo en EE.UU. y en su propio seno.Heidi Kim, Misionera para la reconciliación racial de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera, moderó una discusión entre los miembros del Consejo y el personal [de la DFMS] después de la presentación de Day. Ella sugirió que cada persona probablemente reaccionará de manera diferente a lo que Day había dicho. Para algunos, se trataba de “información completamente nueva” y para otros “es el tipo de cosa de la que hemos estado leyendo y haciendo y participando y en la que hemos estado inmersos hasta las orejas durante mucho tiempo, e intentando hablar al respecto sin llegar a ninguna parte”. Ninguna de las experiencias en ese espectro de reacciones es correcta o errónea y ninguna es para expertos o principiantes.“El propósito de la presentación de la Dra. Day en el día de hoy fue insuflar el Espíritu Santo en medio nuestro”, dijo ella.El Muy Rdo. Brian Baker, miembro del Consejo por la VIII Provincia, dijo que escuchar la presentación de Day constituía un paso importante en la obtención, por parte del Consejo, de un modelo de cómo la Iglesia Episcopal podía llevar a cabo esta tarea. “Si esperamos que la Iglesia Episcopal lo llegue a hacer bien, debemos ser capaces de hacerlo bien”, afirmó.“No creo que haya para nosotros nada más importante que hacer que abrazar esta tarea”, dijo David Bailey, obispo de Navajolandia. “Si la hacemos bien, es algo que podremos aportarle al resto de la Iglesia. Pero mientras no estemos dispuestos a avanzar e invertir el tiempo, la energía y el dolor que esto conlleva, todo el trabajo que hagamos en el Consejo Ejecutivo en verdad carecerá de importancia”. Hacer esa labor, dijo Bailey, “sería verdaderamente un don para el resto de la Iglesia”.Miembros del Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Finanzas para el Ministerio del Consejo Ejecutivo y su Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Defensa Social e Interconexiones para la Misión deliberan el 17 de noviembre en el Centro de Conferencias del Instituto Marítimo en Linthicum Heights, Maryland. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceEn otras decisiones tomadas el 18 de noviembre, el Consejo también* Oyó un informe sobre la Peregrinación de Jóvenes Adultos a Ferguson, Misurí, que tuvo lugar del 8 al 12 de octubre, presentado por tres miembros del personal, incluidos Kim, Chuck Wynder, misionero de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera [DFMS] para la justicia social y la participación en la defensa social, y Bronwyn Skov, encargada de la DFMS para el ministerio de la juventud. Kim dijo que la peregrinación se propuso ser una experiencia de transformación y formación espirituales más que una conferencia o una sesión de capacitación o de activismo. El objetivo de los planificadores, según Skov, no fue proporcionarle a los jóvenes adultos una experiencia desde la cumbre, sino más bien crear “un espacio muy incómodo en el cual el Espíritu Santo tuviera la posibilidad de establecerse y de obrar”. El personal estuvo disponible para ayudar a los peregrinos en lo que necesitaran. Tal y como resultó, dijo ella, “hubo muchísimo expresión de culpa de parte de los blancos en el salón a la cual muchos de nosotros no sabíamos como enfrentarnos. Wynder dijo que el grupo “trascendió el binario blanco y negro”. De los 25 participantes, 10 eran blancos, 10 eran negros y los cinco restantes eran latinos, nativoamericanos y oriundos de las islas del Pacífico.Warren Wong, miembro del Consejo, habla ante una reunión conjunta el 17 de noviembre del Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Finanzas para el Ministerio del Consejo Ejecutivo y su Comité Permanente Conjunto sobre Defensa Social e Interconexiones para la Misión en el Centro de Conferencias del Instituto Marítimo en Linthicum Heights, Maryland. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS* Eligió a los nuevos miembros del Consejo, Warren Wong y Ed Konieczny, obispo de Oklahoma, para integrar el Comité Ejecutivo del Consejo.* Oyó que Curry y Jennings han establecido un comité de revisión legal ad hoc para evaluar las actuales funciones legales, así como las necesidades legales tanto del Consejo como de la Sociedad Misionera Nacional y Extranjera. El comité se crea con antelación al nuevo cargo de Director Encargado de Asuntos Legales que la convención creó mediante una revisión del Canon 1.4. El cambio canónico entra en vigor en enero. El comité ad hoc también elaborará un contenido de trabajo para el proceso.* Se reunió en sesión ejecutiva por unos 45 minutos durante la mañana. Al ir a entrar a la sesión a puertas cerradas, la miembro del consejo Fredrica Thompsett dijo que la sesión “consideraría un par de asuntos enunciados en el informe del obispo Stacy, uno concerniente a Haití y el otro concerniente a algunos problemas de los funcionarios y el personal”. El obispo Stacy Sauls, director de Operaciones, había hablado ante el Consejo el 17 de noviembre acerca de la organización y responsabilidades del personal denominacional. Su presentación fue parte de la típica orientación del Consejo que tiene lugar al comienzo de cada trienio.Un resumen de las resoluciones aprobadas por el Consejo se encuentran aquí.La reunión del 15 al 18 de noviembre tuvo lugar en el Centro de Conferencias del Instituto Marítimo.En el transcurso de la última sesión matutina del 18 de noviembre, Barlowe les dijo a los miembros que habían encontrado una grabadora de audio oculta en el suelo del pleno cerca de la mesa donde él, Curry, Jennings y otros miembros habían estado sentados durante las sesiones plenarias. Él le pidió a los miembros de del Consejo que revisaran los tableros de sus mesas y que miraran debajo de ellas por si hubiera cualquier aparato adicional. Barlowe dijo también que su personal estaba chequeando a ver si había cintas grabadas de seguridad que pudieran revisarse para determinar lo que ocurrió.El Consejo Ejecutivo lleva a cabo los programas y políticas adoptadas por la Convención General, según el Canon I.4 (1)(a). El Consejo está compuesto de 38 miembros, 20 de los cuales (cuatro obispos, cuatro presbíteros o diáconos y 12 laicos) son elegidos por la Convención General, y 18 por los nueve sínodos provinciales (un clérigo y un laico cada uno) por períodos de seis años, además del Obispo Primado y el Presidente y el vicepresidente de la Cámara de Diputados.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Press Release Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Rector Hopkinsville, KY Por Mary Frances Schjonberg Posted Nov 18, 2015 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Course Director Jerusalem, Israel The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Youth Minister Lorton, VA Executive Council November 2015 Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Job Listing Submit an Event Listing Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN center_img Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Bath, NC Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Belleville, IL Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Director of Music Morristown, NJ Executive Council, Cathedral Dean Boise, ID El Consejo Ejecutivo concluye cuatro días de ‘una reunión llena de júbilo’ Los miembros comienzan un nuevo trienio con énfasis en la evangelización y la reconciliación Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ last_img read more

El ministerio de Partiendo el Pan en Iowa mezcla lo…

first_imgEl ministerio de Partiendo el Pan en Iowa mezcla lo secular y lo sagrado Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit an Event Listing Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Washington, DC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Job Listing Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Hopkinsville, KY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Bath, NC Rector Belleville, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Greg Mazunik toca la guitarra en una reunión de Partiendo el Pan celebrada en una pizzería. Foto de Breaking Bread.[Episcopal News Service] Hace pocas semanas, en la Feria del Estado de Iowa, no lejos de los perros calientes con maíz, los juegos de carnaval y la rueda volante, la Rda. Lydia Bucklin bautizaba a sus dos niños debajo de un árbol, ceremonia a la que algunos transeúntes se unían y otros miraban con asombro. El evento fue el último de una serie de reuniones mensuales del Ministerio de Partiendo el Pan, un grupo que comenzó en octubre de 2015 en una taberna en las afueras de Des Moines.Bucklin, la misionera para los jóvenes adultos de la Diócesis Episcopal de Iowa, comenzó el grupo con Lizzie Gilman y Zebulun Treloar-Reid luego de una conversación en un retiro. Gilman tenía un amigo que estaba empezando una cervecería, y pensaron que sería una buena manera de que los jóvenes adultos experimentaran la eucaristía en el mundo”, explicó Bucklin.Con permiso del obispo de Iowa, Alan Scarfe, Bucklin comenzó a crear una liturgia para un oficio sagrado en un espacio secular. Finalmente creo un programa portátil, que se parece a un oficio eucarístico regular con unas pocas excepciones: no hay sermón tradicional, ni recitación del Credo Niceno ni confesión de pecados. En su lugar, hay dos lecturas tomadas de toda una variedad de fuentes, tales como poemas, meditaciones o pasajes de libros.Cuando la gente llega para [participar de] Partiendo el Pan, cada uno recibe un boletín donde aparece resaltada una porción de la liturgia, la cual ha de leer. A veces, un voluntario lleva una guitarra para hacer un poco de música; otras veces resulta más orgánico cantar un himno.“Yo no puedo hacer mucho más que presidir la mesa”, dijo Bucklin. “Ayuda a promover la idea de que todos somos llamados a hacer la obra de Dios. Todos somos parte de ella”.Pero el aspecto más interesante del oficio es lo que Bucklin llama “la pregunta eficaz”. Sentados en círculo, como es la forma preferida para el oficio, alguien leerá una pregunta predeterminada sobre un tema espiritual de interés general, seguido por la práctica deliberada de escuchar mientras las personas comparten sus historias personales.La Rda Lydia Bucklin se prepara para bautizar a su hijo Corson (a la derecha de la mesa) y a su hija Isla (con el bañador rosado) en la Feria del Estado de Iowa. Foto de Breaking Bread.“Yo aún sigo básicamente el Libro de Oración Común”, dijo Bucklin. “Puede que no digamos el Credo Niceno ni la confesión de pecados, pero podríamos tener conversaciones acerca del pecado o acerca de los aspectos importantes de nuestra fe y cuáles de ellos no son negociables. O de aquellas cosas con las que estamos en conflicto”.Bucklin dice que el ambiente invita a que la gente se exprese. Y ha habido casos en que los asistentes han compartido [problemas de] depresión, consumo de drogas y arrestos.Después de la eucaristía, en la cual todo el mundo se sirve mutuamente la comunión alrededor del círculo, el oficio concluye con una práctica tomada del Kaleidoscope Institute de Eric Law en la cual todo el mundo completa la frase: “Hoy le pedí a Dios [espacio en blanco] y hoy le doy gracias a Dios por [espacio en blanco]”. Luego el grupo prosigue sus conversaciones mientras comparte comida y bebida.Desde la primera reunión hace casi un año, el grupo cuenta con un núcleo de asistencia de seis u ocho personas, además de otras 10 o 15 que pueden aparecerse en cada lugar y hora en particular. Además de la cervecería y de la feria del estado, se han celebrado oficios en un parque, una pizzería e incluso en la casa de Lizzie Gilman, una de las fundadoras de Partiendo el Pan.Gilman es ama de casa y madre dos niñas y conoce muy bien lo difícil que puede ser a veces lograr que las familias jóvenes asistan a la iglesia el domingo por la mañana.“Los tiempos han cambiado en que los mañanas del domingo no son factibles para algunas familias y personas solas. Si la gente tenía eventos deportivos y niños pequeños o tal vez querían dormir —sea lo que fuere— las mañanas del domingo no parecían estar funcionando bien para los jóvenes adultos”, explicó Gilman. “De manera que estuvimos pensando ¿qué hace la gente? Bien, sale después del trabajo. Es fácil cancelar un domingo por la mañana, pero cuando alguien te ofrece darte de comer y comprarte una cerveza, podría interesarte probar”.Para Gilman, llevar el ministerio de la iglesia a la gente es el aspecto más inspirador de Partiendo el Pan. “Creo que es importante que la Iglesia vea lo extraordinario que es el espíritu cuando nos reunimos más allá de los muros de la iglesia”, afirmó. “Podemos reunirnos un día diferente o en un lugar diferente, pero estamos celebrando la misma eucaristía. Sólo sentir esa sacralidad, vayas donde vayas, es un sentimiento vigoroso. Es como asistir a una cena donde no conoces a nadie, y confías en que el Espíritu Santo va a proporcionarte un rato estupendo”.“Ha habido muchas personas que han venido que nunca habrían entrado en una iglesia. Algunas de ellas nos lo han dicho”, comentó Bucklin, quien puso el ejemplo del encargado de una iglesia que reconoció que nunca había asistido al oficio dentro porque no sabía si tenía dinero suficiente para poner en la bandeja de la ofrenda. Cuando descubrió que se estaban reuniendo en un parque, asistió al oficio porque se sentía más cómodo.Bucklin enfatiza en cada oficio que no se espera que las personas se unan [a la congregación] o se conviertan en miembros. Y puesto que hay pocos gastos generales en brindar el oficio, no se piden donaciones. “No necesitamos de un edificio elegante ni de una tonelada de suministros”, aclaró ella. “Yo llevo simplemente una bolsa con un cáliz, una patena y un par de paños. Otra persona trae el vino y el pan. Cuando lo tuvimos en la feria estatal, tuvimos que usar la parte inferior del pan de un sándwich de cerdo”.Esa combinación de un ambiente tranquilo con un deliberado oficio eucarístico es lo que hace notable a Partiendo el Pan y permite sus singulares interacciones.Uno de los momentos más memorables de Bucklin se produjo en el oficio del Miércoles de Ceniza en la pizzería local. Gilman invitó a participar al personal de la cocina y del servicio, y tres personas salieron con lágrimas en los ojos para participar en él. Luego de imponerle la ceniza a una camarera llena de tatuajes llamada Angel, la hija de Bucklin le dijo a su madre: “Mami, yo no quiero ser polvo”. Sin dudar un segundo, Angel le respondió, “pero, mi cielo, ¿no sabes que las estrellas más lindas están hechas de polvo, como tú y yo? Eres una estrella brillante y luminosa”.“Fue uno de esos momentos en que te das cuenta de que es por eso que haces lo que haces”, recalcó Bucklin.Para Treloar-Reid, recién graduado del seminario y cofundador de Partiendo el Pan, uno de los aspectos más importantes del ministerio es que va más allá de una congregación. “Esto se concentra más en reunir a personas del área metropolitana en lugar de una congregación específica”, apuntó. “Se trata de llevar lo sagrado a los espacios seculares de manera que podamos empezar a borrar los límites entre lo sagrado y lo secular”.Treloar-Reid, un transexual de 27 años, también aprecia que el grupo se muestre receptivo y solidario con la comunidad LGBTQ. En tal sentido, Bucklin ha hecho un esfuerzo para crear una liturgia libre de lenguaje genérico, eliminando referencias a Dios con pronombres masculinos o como padre, así como otros ajustes.“Personalmente nunca tuve problemas en usar pronombres masculinos para referirme a Dios, porque nunca realmente creía que Dios fuese físicamente masculino”, dijo Treloar-Reid. “Pero creo que es importante recordarle a la gente que Dios no es parte del patriarcado. Creo que si usamos demasiado un lenguaje masculino, podemos comenzar a glorificar demasiado a la persona masculina, y eso es peligroso.“Aprecio que tengamos espacios donde hablemos acerca de Dios en una perspectiva más amplia porque en definitiva Dios no tiene sexo”.Rachael Essing, de 22 años y voluntaria del Cuerpo de Servicio Episcopal se muestra de acuerdo. “Las palabras en la liturgia que usamos no son binarias, ni todo es masculino, lo cual como mujer joven que soy, lo aprecio de veras”.“Me gusta la tradición, de manera que me gusta tener algunas cosas en las que me pueda enfocar y saber de donde vienen”, añadió Essing. “Pero, también me gusta incorporar nuevas fuentes, porque hay muchísimo material a nuestra disposición y que se aviene mejor otras personas. Ello nos abre a un mundo con el que pueden conectarse”.En su breve existencia, el formato de Partiendo el Pan ya está empezando a extenderse al tiempo que algunas diócesis vecinas han comenzado a poner a prueba el formato.“Es una fórmula fácil de asumir de hacerla suya y de ponerla en práctica en cualquier parte”, dijo Bucklin. “La idea era tenerla en montones de distintos lugares para expresar que lo sagrado está en torno a todos nosotros. Podemos encontrar lo divino en las cosas ordinarias y en las personas ordinarias”.– Luke Blount es un escritor independiente radicado en Durham, Carolina del Norte. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Press Release Service Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit a Press Release Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Por Luke BlountPosted Sep 9, 2016 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem last_img read more

Los Angeles diocese announces 5 nominees for bishop coadjutor election

first_img Featured Events New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Submit a Press Release Tags Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The bishop coadjutor-elect will succeed Los Angeles Bishop Diocesan J. Jon Bruno upon his retirement.“I give thanks for the members and work of the search committee, and for all the people who have offered themselves as candidates,” said Bruno, who was elected bishop coadjutor in 1999.“We are blessed to have a slate of talented, experienced, soulful candidates, any one of whom could lead this diocese forward, each of whom wishes only to serve Christ and the church as called,” said the Rev. Canon Julian Bull, search committee chair and head of Campbell Hall, an Episcopal school in North Hollywood. “We ask for your continuing prayers for the candidates and their families, and for our diocese as we move towards convention.”The committee also has designed and published a process (posted here) for nominations by petition (formerly nominations from the floor) following best practices of other U.S. dioceses. The petition process is open Sept. 4-12.A series of four regional forums, offering opportunities for all in the diocese to meet and confer with the candidates, is set for Oct. 7-9 in Laguna Hills, North Hollywood, Ventura and Redlands. A detailed schedule is here.Within the Episcopal Church, a bishop coadjutor is elected to succeed a bishop diocesan upon his or her retirement or resignation, and to assist the diocesan in ministry for a period prior to official installation as bishop diocesan. Pending necessary consents of the dioceses and bishops of the Episcopal Church, liturgical rites welcoming the new bishop are envisioned for early summer 2017. Submit an Event Listing Los Angeles diocese announces 5 nominees for bishop coadjutor election Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET [Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles] The Bishop Coadjutor Search Committee of the Episcopal Diocese of Los Angeles has announced a slate of five nominees to stand for election as bishop coadjutor. The election will take place at the Diocesan Convention meeting Dec. 2-3 in Ontario, California.The candidates are:the Rev. Paul Fromberg, rector of St. Gregory of Nyssa, San Francisco;the Rev. Rachel Nyback, rector of St. Cross, Hermosa Beach, California;the Rev. Anna Olson, rector of St. Mary’s, (Mariposa Avenue) Los Angeles;the Rt. Rev. Pierre Whalon, bishop of the Paris-based Convocation of Episcopal Churches in Europe; andthe Rev. Mauricio Wilson, rector of St. Paul’s, Oakland, California. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Bishop Elections Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Knoxville, TN Posted Sep 6, 2016 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Pittsburgh, PA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York center_img Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Bath, NC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listing The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Collierville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab last_img read more

‘El camino de Jesús venera el agua’ dice el Obispo…

first_img‘El camino de Jesús venera el agua’ dice el Obispo Primado a los protectores de Roca Enhiesta La visita a Dakota del Norte abunda en oración, escucha y reflexión Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Standing Rock El obispo primado Michael Curry junto a la Autopista 1806 de Dakota del Norte el 24 de septiembre para presenciar como agentes de la fuerza pública llegaban a un pequeño campamento de los que protestan contra el llamado Oleoducto para el Acceso a las Dakotas para arrestar a varias personas acusadas de quitar los letreros de ‘prohibido el paso’ en el terreno de un rancho vecino comprado recientemente por por la compañía que construye el oleoducto. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Nota de la redacción: Una galería de imágenes de la visita del obispo primado Michael Curry a la nación sioux de Roca Enhiesta puede encontrarse aquí.[Episcopal News Service – Bismarck, Dakota del Norte] El obispo primado Michael Curry vino a Dakota del Norte los días 24 y 25 de septiembre para declarar en persona que él, la Iglesia Episcopal y, más importante aún, Dios mismo, están junto a la nación sioux de Roca Enhiesta en su lucha contra el Oleoducto para el Acceso a las Dakotas que pasará por debajo sus reservas de agua, por las tierras que les pertenecen conforme a lo pactado [con el gobierno de EE.UU.] y a través de algunos de sus lugares de enterramiento.Curry se pronunció también a favor de la reconciliación racial en medio de la oposición que a veces ha sacado a relucir las históricas tensiones de la zona entre indios y no indios. Entabló conversaciones, con episcopales, líderes de otras iglesias, residentes de Bismarck y el alcalde de esta ciudad, sobre racismo y justicia medioambiental, e instó a las personas a proseguir el diálogo después que él se haya ido.El Rdo. John Floberg le dijo a Curry que la acción contra el oleoducto es un “momento kairós”, una palabra griega para significar el tiempo designado por Dios para actuar. El momento —dijo Floberg, sacerdote supervisor de las iglesias episcopales del lado de Dakota del Norte de [la reserva india] de Roca Enhiesta [Standing Rock]— está lleno de esperanza porque “Dios está haciendo algo aquí” que trasciende la mera protesta.Ese algo ha unido a los indios de Roca Enhiesta con miembros y líderes de al menos 250 de las tribus reconocidas en Estados Unidos en una muestra de unidad sin precedentes. Muchos no nativoamericanos han acudido también a participar en las protestas, y entre ellos muchos episcopales de otras partes del país.Y muchas personas están re-explorando la manera en que se han relacionado tradicionalmente entre sí en el contexto de la protesta que algunos dicen está afectando la parte de la economía del estado que depende de la extracción de recursos naturales, en particular el petróleo y el gas, y los empleos que proporcionará el oleoducto. Energy Transfer Partners, la compañía con sede en Dallas que está construyendo el oleoducto, dice que la construcción creará de 8.000 a 12,000 puestos de trabajos locales, si bien la AFL-CIO [Organización Americana del Trabajo y Congreso de Organización Industriales] ha reducido la cifra a 4.500.El obispo primado Michael Curry reacciona el 25 de septiembre cuando le dicen que los fieles de la iglesia episcopal de Santiago Apóstol en Cannon Ball, Dakota del Norte, se reunieron en la iglesia el 1 de noviembre de 2015 para ver una transmisión de su instalación como 27º. Obispo Primado de la Iglesia Episcopal. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.“Dios está en el negocio del movimiento”, dijo Curry durante su sermón del 25 de septiembre en la iglesia episcopal de Santiago Apóstol [St. James] en Cannon Ball, Dakota del Norte. “Si se fijan atentamente en la Biblia, descubrirán que la manera usual que Dios tiene de cambiar al mundo —incluso si lo hace lentamente— es la de crear un movimiento de personas que han de seguir su camino”.El Obispo Primado citó [el ejemplo de] Abraham y Sara a quienes él dijo que Dios llamó a compartir con otros su manera de vivir. El movimiento de pueblos que ellos iniciaron dieron lugar al cristianismo, el judaísmo y el islam, recalcó el Primado, quien comparó la protesta por el oleoducto con Moisés conduciendo a los hebreos a la Tierra Prometida. Dios envió plagas al Faraón para protestar por su renuencia a liberar al pueblo hebreo de la opresión, señaló Curry.“Eso es Roca Enhiesta en la Biblia. Esa es la gente que se alza sobre su suelo y dice ‘no contamine nuestra agua’’’, dijo él. Ese es el pueblo de Roca Enhiesta que dice ‘no violen nuestras sagradas sepulturas’”.Luego está el movimiento que creó Jesús, siguió diciendo Curry, un movimiento de personas llamadas a practicar el amor, la justicia, la compasión y a intentar “parecerse de algún modo a Jesús”.“Tengo la impresión de que si empezamos a parecernos a Jesús, ustedes no tendrían que protestar aquí en Roca Enhiesta, porque el camino de Jesús venera el agua” mediante el acto del bautismo.Sermón del Obispo Primado en la iglesia de Santiago Apóstol, Cannon BallVisita al campamento de Oceti SakowinEl día anterior, Curry; Floberg; Heidi J. Kim, misionera de la Iglesia Episcopal para la reconciliación racial; el Rdo. Charles A. Wynder Jr., misionero para la justicia social y la participación en la defensa social; el Rdo. Michael Hunn, canónigo del Obispo Primado para el ministerio dentro de la Iglesia Episcopal; el obispo John Tarrant, de Dakota del Sur y el obispo Mark Narum del Sínodo de Dakota del Norte Occidental de la IELA viajaron al campamento de Oceti Sakowin junto al río Cannonball y cerca de donde éste desemboca en el río Misurí (el obispo de Dakota del Norte Michael Smith estaba en un viaje al extranjero previamente planeado).Curry le habló a los que se oponen al oleoducto, que prefieren llamarse “protectores”, durante la sesión informativa diaria del campamento. Les dijo que la Iglesia Episcopal está solidariamente con ellos porque “el agua es un don del creador”.“El agua significa vida para todos los hijos de Dios, seres humanos que son dones del Creador’, dijo Curry, añadiendo que “vuestra lucha no es sólo vuestra lucha, es nuestra lucha; es la lucha de la comunidad humana”.El obispo primado Michael Curry les habla a los opositores del oleoductoEl oleoducto de aproximadamente 1,886 kilómetros de largo y 70 cm. de diámetro transportará diariamente unos 570,000 barriles de petróleo crudo ligero desde los yacimientos petrolíferos de Bakken y Three Forks en Dakota del Norte hasta Patoka, Illinois. El Cuerpo de Ingenieros del Ejército de EE.UU. expidió permisos el pasado 26 de julio en los que autorizaba la construcción del oleoducto.Los que se oponen al oleoducto dicen que constituye una amenaza demasiado grande para el medioambiente. La tribu dice que el oleoducto atravesaría tierras que le pertenecen conforme a tratados [con el gobierno federal], que profanaría sitios sagrados y que amenaza el agua potable de 8.000 miembros que viven en las aproximadamente 930.000 hectáreas de la reserva. El oleoducto cruzaría por debajo del rio Misurí, la fuente de agua de la tribu, en los límites de la reserva de Roca Enhiesta.Energy Transfer Partners opina que el oleoducto proporcionará una vía “más directa, económica, segura y ambientalmente responsable” de transportar petróleo y reduciría el uso actual de transporte por ferrocarril y carretera. Al menos 42 personas murieron en 2013 cuando un tren que arrastraba unos 7 millones de litros de petróleo crudo desde Dakota del Norte a las refinerías canadienses se descarriló en medio de una violenta explosión in Lac-Megantic, Quebec.Reuters informó el 23 de septiembre que su análisis de datos del gobierno sobre derrames de petróleo crudo mostraba que Sunoco Logistics, la compañía que administrará el oleoducto una vez que esté funcionando, ha tenido más derrames que ninguno de sus competidores. Sunoco tuvo derrames costeros de oleoductos costeros al menos 203 veces a lo largo de los últimos seis años, informó Reuters.George Fulford, de Mandan, Dakota del Norte, en primer plano a la derecha, habla durante un período de escucha que se organizó el 24 de septiembre para el obispo primado Michael Curry, arriba al centro, en el campamento de Oceti Skowin. Sentados a la derecha de Curry están el obispo de Dakota del Sur John Tarrant y el obispo Mark Narum del Sínodo de Dakota del Norte Occidental de la IELA. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.En ese contexto, Curry pasó más de una hora sentado en un círculo en él área de reunión episcopal del campamento de Oceti Sakowin escuchando las preocupaciones de las personas y sus esperanzas en el papel de la Iglesia en respaldo de su acción.Rosa Wilson, una episcopal de Roca Enhiesta, fue una de las muchas personas que hablaron. Ella describió la discriminación que había experimentado, incluyendo el que la golpearan en la escuela secundaria y el que la vigilaran tenderos de Bismarck cuando era joven por creer que robaría [cosas de las tiendas] por ser india.“¿Qué puedo hacer? ¿Qué puedo hacer para intentar hacerlo mejor? No sé si al orar Dios nos escuchará”, dijo ella. “Después de 74 años, sencillamente tengo que respetar a todo el mundo que me sale al encuentro y simplemente ser un persona que da amor”.El campamento de Oceti Skowin se extiende a lo largo de la ribera norte del río Cannonball, en la reserva sioux de Roca Enhiesta. Así se ve desde una altura que le llaman Facebook Hill, donde se reúnen los medios de prensa y donde la gente puede cargar sus aparatos electrónicos en un camión con paneles de energía solar y donde uno puede en ocasiones conseguir una señal para el teléfono celular. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Una mujer entró en el círculo para cuestionar los motivos de los miembros de la Iglesia de venir al campamento, preguntando en repetidas ocasiones lo que querían y si su objetivo era el de convertir indios.La Rda. Lauren Stanley, sacerdote episcopal encargada de la reserva india de Rosebud, dijo que sus cinco iglesias estaban allí para apoyar a los que protestaban del modo que necesitaran apoyo. Cuando los episcopales de Rosebud oyeron que el campamento necesitaba leña, los miembros de su iglesia entregaron cinco haces [de 3,6 metros c/u], contó ella. También llevaron comida al campamento y estaban tratando de conseguir un generador eléctrico.Stanley dijo también que se había comentado el día de la visita de Curry que el campamento necesitaba otro divisor de troncos y que ella le había pedido al Obispo Primado que lo comprara. “Luego, lo tendremos aquí en dos semanas”, explicó.“Nuestro objetivo no es decirle nada a nadie; nuestro objetivo es apoyarles”, recalcó ella.“No estamos aquí para convertirles. Nosotros no. No somos los antiguos cristianos”, le dijo Stanley a la mujer, refiriéndose a los que les exigían a los indios que se hicieran cristianos.Conversatorio acerca de enfrentar la diversidad y el racismoAntes de dirigirse al campamento esa mañana, Curry se reunió con líderes comunitarios, docentes y religiosos de la localidad para un desayuno conversatorio sobre el impacto de la creciente protesta en la zona y la historia de las relaciones raciales allí.El alcalde de Bismarck Mike Seminary le dijo a Curry que unas 4.000 personas de los 67.000 habitantes de la ciudad son nativoamericanos. Tocante a lidiar con la diversidad, los residentes no nativos “de cierta manera rehúsan admitirla, y nosotros nos hemos acostumbrado”, dijo.El obispo de Dakota del Sur, John Tarrant, al centro, presenta el 24 de septiembre al obispo primado Michael Curry a Linda Simon, que asiste a la iglesia episcopal de San Marcos en Aberdeen, Dakota del Sur. Simon, miembro de la tribu sioux del río Cheyenne, estaba en el campamento de Oceti Skowin por primera vez. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Él describió una reunión con líderes empresariales hace unos años, antes de ser alcalde, para hablar de pasos a seguir para cubrir 7.500 puestos de trabajo que entonces estaban vacantes en la ciudad. Los empresarios discutieron el acudir a ferias de empleos en grandes ciudades para atraer a los que buscaban trabajo, dijo Seminary. Cuando él les preguntó si habían intentado contratar personal entre los indios de la localidad, el alcalde dijo que tuvo que enfrentarse con tácitos estereotipos sobre la capacidad de inserción laboral de los indios.Seminary asistió al oficio en Santiago Apóstol al día siguiente y le habló a la congregación, formulando su promesa de solidaridad y afirmando que él oraba todos los días por la gente de Roca Enhiesta. Durante el desayuno conversatorio del 24 de septiembre, siempre que nativos y no nativos se encuentran es una manera de entablar relaciones. Esas relaciones podrían llevar la comunidad a un momento cuando ver a nativos y no nativos trabajando juntos pasara inadvertido, dijo él.Esa noche de regreso a Bismarck, que queda a una hora [en auto] al norte del campamento, Curry se reunió con unas 50 personas en la iglesia episcopal de San Jorge [St. George’s Episcopal Church] para hablar acerca del racismo. Es una conversación que no siempre resulta cómoda con algunos miembros de la tribu que hablan de la discriminación que han experimentado o presenciado en la ciudad y en que otros participantes hablan de su percepción del racismo y de la manera en que han reaccionado.Carmen Goodhouse, una lakota hunkpapa y episcopal de tercera generación, dijo “nos enseñaron que siempre tenemos que defendernos debido al racismo” y no se ha hecho lo bastante para eliminar el racismo en la zona. El Movimiento de Jesús es necesario en Dakota del Norte, afirmó ella, porque “aparte de pedirle a Jesús”, ella no sabe cómo cambiarán las cosas.Dominic Hanson dijo que él “entiende completamente que haya habido muchísimo racismo hacia los nativos”, pero dijo que también ha visto “muchísimo racismo de parte de los nativos hacia los blancos en general y hacia otras razas”.“Creo que el problema que en verdad debemos abordar con sinceridad es que no es culpa de los blancos que no nos estemos relacionando”, dijo. “Creo que, como un todo, nadie está realmente sincerándose con nadie y queriendo establecer esas conexiones. Y es por eso que estamos aquí hoy. Estamos dispuestos a sincerarnos”.Las protestas se extienden a través de la reserva y más alláLa Diócesis de Dakota del Norte ha respaldado la causa de la oposición al oleoducto. El 19 de agosto emitió un comunicado de apoyo y miembros de la diócesis han estado en los tres campamentos de protesta ayudando a crear una presencia unificada y ayudando [a cubrir] necesidades materiales. Curry siguió con una declaración de apoyo, en la que define la protesta como “la que nos une en la lucha en pro de la justicia y la reconciliación raciales con la justicia climática y el cuidado por la creación de Dios como una cuestión de mayordomía”. Las nueve iglesias episcopales de la reserva de Roca Enhiesta publicaron una carta el 5 de septiembre en que expresaban su solidaridad con la nación sioux.Leona Volk, de la iglesia episcopal de San Marcos en Aberdeen, Dakota del Sur, saluda al obispo primado Michael Curry el 24 de septiembre en el campamento de Oceti Skowin. Volk tiene nietos que viven en la reserva sioux de Roca Enhiesta cerca de donde pasaría el Oleoducto para el Acceso a las Dakotas. “Se ha logrado que se detenga aquí, ahora”, afirmó ella. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.Las manifestaciones y protestas han ido más allá de Dakota del Norte. Los que abogan por la calidad del agua, aliados de los pueblos indígenas y partidarios del movimiento No al Oleoducto para el Acceso a las Dakotas, con la almohadilla [hashtag] #NoDAPL, han comenzado manifestaciones a través del país. Esta actividad ha llamado la atención del Congreso, del Grupo de Trabajo de Naciones Unidas sobre las Poblaciones Indígenas y de celebridades.En un lapso de 48 horas la semana pasada, el presidente tribal Dave Archambault II testificó en Ginebra, en el Consejo de Derechos Humanos de Naciones Unidas y en Washington, D.C. ante el Comité de Recursos Naturales de la Cámara de Representantes de EE.UU. La agrupación de derechos de las Naciones Unidas dijo el 22 de septiembre después del testimonio de Archambault, que Estados Unidos debería detener la construcción del oleoducto debido a sus amenazas ambientales y culturales, y porque a la nación sioux de Roca Enhiesta no la habían tratado adecuadamente durante el proceso de la obtención de permisos.Archambault tenía programado estar en Santiago Apóstol el 25 de septiembre, pero Floberg dijo que se encontraba en Washington, D.C. tratando asuntos relacionados con el oleoducto.Para el 26 de septiembre, cerca de 1.300 arqueólogos, funcionarios de museos, académicos y estudiantes han firmado una carta dirigida al gobierno de Obama en que solicitan una declaración minuciosa sobre el impacto medioambiental y una encuesta de los recursos culturales de la ruta del oleoducto en debida consulta con el tribu sioux de Roca Enhiesta.Una batalla librada en los tribunalesEntre tanto, un tribunal federal de apelaciones ordenó el 16 de septiembre a Energy Transfer Partners que detuviera la construcción a 32 kilómetros del lago Oahe, la sección represada del río Misurí bajo la cual pasará el oleoducto, a fin de permitirle al tribunal más tiempo para considerar la petición de la tribu sioux de Roca Enhiesta de un requerimiento de emergencia para impedir la ulterior destrucción de lugares sagrados en un área de 32 kilómetros a ambos lados del lago.La tribu solicitó el requerimiento de emergencia luego de que el juez federal de distrito James Boasberg le denegara su petición de un requerimiento preliminar para suspender la construcción del oleoducto mientras la demanda legal de la tribu contra el Cuerpo de Ingenieros del Ejército de EE.UU. por permitir el oleoducto estaba sujeta a consideración.Al cabo de unas horas del dictamen del 9 de septiembre, tres agencias federales dijeron que detendrían la construcción y le pidieron a Energy Transfer Partners que “suspendiera voluntariamente” el trabajo en tierras del gobierno, tierra que los funcionarios tribales dicen que contiene sitios de enterramiento y artefactos sagrados.Las agencias federales también dijeron que el caso resalta la necesidad de un debate serio sobre la reforma destinada incorporar los puntos de vista de las tribus en tales proyectos de infraestructura, entre ellos, mejores formas de incluir en las decisiones la opinión de las tribus respecto a protección de tierras, recursos y derechos acordados. Las agencias “invitarán a las tribus a consultas formales de gobierno a gobierno”. La Ley Nacional de Preservación Histórica exige ese nivel de consulta con las tribus.La situación en los campamentos y en sus cercanías sigue evolucionando. El 22 de septiembre, Energy Transfer Partners compró a los hacendados David y Brenda Meyer, más de 2,400 hectáreas, incluyendo tierras que se vieron implicadas en uno de los pocos incidentes violentos de la protesta, informó el Bismarck Tribune. Los manifestantes se enfrentaron con guardias de seguridad contratados por Energy Transfer Partners el 3 de febrero mientras la compañía comenzaba a cavar en un terreno que la tribu le había dicho al tribunal el día antes que era sagrado y que había servido de sitio de enterramiento. Funcionarios de la policía dijeron que cuatro guardias y dos perros guardianes resultaron lesionados, en tanto un portavoz tribal dijo que los perros habían mordido a seis personas y que al menos a otras 30 las habían rociado con gas pimienta, según informó la Associated Press.Un policía estatal de Dakota del Norte filma a los miembros del personal del Obispo Primado mientras se alinean en la Autopista 1806 de Dakota del Norte el 24 de septiembre al tiempo que los agentes del orden público arrestan a dos hombres en un pequeño campamento de protesta contra el Oleoducto para el Acceso a las Dakotas. Foto de Mary Frances Schjonberg/ENS.El periódico de Bismarck dijo que los Meyer habían dicho en una estación local de televisión que habían vendido la tierra por motivos de inconveniencias, que había demasiadas personas en su propiedad todo el tiempo y que era un rancho bello pero que “sencillamente querían salir de él”.Dos días después, el Obispo Primado y su personal se detuvieron junto a la Autopista 1806 de Dakota del Norte a su regreso a Bismarck para presenciar como los agentes de la fuerza pública llegaban en nueve vehículos a un pequeño campamento de protesta contra el oleoducto. Mientras un helicóptero circulaba por encima, ellos tranquilamente arrestaron a dos hombres, acusándolos de haber quitado los letreros que advertían “Prohibido el paso” [no-trespassing] de las cercas que bordean la tierra en disputa. Un policía estatal filmó también a los miembros del personal del Obispo Primado mientras se encontraban alineados en la autopista.– La Rda. Mary Frances Schjonberg es redactora y reportera de Episcopal News Service. Traducción de Vicente Echerri. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Jobs & Calls Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Indigenous Ministries, Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Press Release Service Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Advocacy Peace & Justice, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Tags Presiding Bishop Michael Curry, The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Knoxville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Submit a Press Release Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Dakota Access Pipeline, Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Smithfield, NC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Por Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Sep 27, 2016 Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Collierville, TN Course Director Jerusalem, Israel AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Belleville, ILlast_img read more

Archbishop of Canterbury issues statement on Synod vote on marriage,…

first_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Human Sexuality, Comments (1) Rector Albany, NY Charles Sacquety says: Archbishop of Canterbury, Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Smithfield, NC [Episcopal News Service] Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby issued the following statement Feb. 15 after the General Synod’s vote “not to take note” of a report by the House of Bishops on marriage and same-sex relationships:No person is a problem, or an issue. People are made in the image of God. All of us, without exception, are loved and called in Christ. There are no ‘problems’, there are simply people.How we deal with the real and profound disagreement – put so passionately and so clearly by many at the Church of England’s General Synod debate on marriage and same-sex relationships today – is the challenge we face as people who all belong to Christ.To deal with that disagreement, to find ways forward, we need a radical new Christian inclusion in the Church. This must be founded in scripture, in reason, in tradition, in theology; it must be based on good, healthy, flourishing relationships, and in a proper 21st century understanding of being human and of being sexual.We need to work together – not just the bishops but the whole Church, not excluding anyone – to move forward with confidence.The vote today is not the end of the story, nor was it intended to be. As bishops we will think again and go on thinking, and we will seek to do better. We could hardly fail to do so in the light of what was said this afternoon.The way forward needs to be about love, joy and celebration of our humanity; of our creation in the image of God, of our belonging to Christ – all of us, without exception, without exclusion. Comments are closed. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL February 16, 2017 at 6:36 pm AMEN1 Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Marriage Equality, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Submit a Press Release Associate Rector Columbus, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Posted Feb 16, 2017 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Same-Sex Marriage Submit a Job Listing The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Tampa, FL Archbishop of Canterbury issues statement on Synod vote on marriage, sexuality report Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Anglican Communion, Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Collierville, TN Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit an Event Listing Tags Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY last_img read more

Anglican Church in Indian Ocean calls for Chagossians’ right of…

first_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Anglican Communion, TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Bath, NC [Anglican Communion News Service] The Standing Committee of the Church of the Province of the Indian Ocean has expressed its solidarity with the Chagossian people in their fight to return to their island homelands. The UK government retained controls of islands in the Chagos Archipelago when it granted Mauritius independence in 1968.Read the full article here. Submit a Press Release Posted Apr 2, 2019 The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Shreveport, LA Indigenous Ministries Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID center_img Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Knoxville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Director of Music Morristown, NJ Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit a Job Listing Featured Events Curate Diocese of Nebraska Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Belleville, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Tampa, FL Press Release Service Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Anglican Church in Indian Ocean calls for Chagossians’ right of return to Diego Garcia Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Collierville, TN Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZlast_img read more